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Report of The Committee to Review In- service Training of The IAS officers

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Introduction

The Committee to Review in-service training of the IAS officers was set up in September 2001 and it submitted its Report in August 2003. The Committee consisted of seven members, all civil servants, all except one belonging to the IAS, some retired, others serving. The Committee’s chairman was B. N. Yugandhar, a former member of the IAS, and who was at one time the Director of the LBS National Academy of Administration, Mussorie. Incidentally, the committees set up since the nineties of the last century are all getting manned by civil servants with little representation from the outside public life of India . They mostly functioned like internal reflection groups.

Summary

The Committee’s terms of reference were to examine the efficiency of the existing in-service training programmes for members of the IAS and make recommendations taking into account the problems faced in the present manner of implementation and also the recommendations of previous committees set up for the purpose. The mandate given to the Yugandher Committee was thus severely limited: the Report claims purely local temporary interest.

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Written by upsc aspirants

February 27th, 2012 at 7:27 pm

The Government’s of India Clerks’ Salaries Committee

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Introduction

Discontentment on the part of personnel in an organization is gravely injurious to its image and productivity. To this end conscious efforts are made to monitor and redress the employee grievances. The Government of India has shown its concern for this problem by the appointment of Pay Commission from time to time.

Summary

The Government of India appointed, in July 1908, a Committee, to investigate the complaints of the clerical personnel working in the secretariat to find out if the prevalent scales of pay were found insufficient to attract and retain man possessing the requisite qualifications and to suggest suitable measures for remedying the position. This Committee, known as the Government of India Clerks’ Salaries Committee, had as its members J.S. Meston, G.B.H. Fell, H. Hudson, H.N. Heseltine, Sarat Chandra Banerjee, Maula Bakhsh and C.W. Caston, the first named being its Chairman. The Committee submitted its report in December of the same year.

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Written by upsc aspirants

January 27th, 2012 at 9:38 pm

The Royal Commission upon Decentralization

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Introduction

In India the Provinces came into existence first and the Central Government came much later. What was then known as the Supreme Government could emerge only under the Regulating Act of 1773. Following the transfer of power of governance from the East India Company to the Crown in 1858, the power and functions of the Central Government in India began to expand steadily making the provinces more and more dependent on it. Governmental administration was becoming growingly centralized. Centralisation touched new heights under Lord Curzon, Viceroy of India during 1894-1904 and 1904-05. Departments after department, service after service was over-hauled. Principles were executed and standards were set causing excessive concentration of authority in the hands of Central Government. The Central Government had imposed detailed financial and administrative restrictions on the provinces, which fettered them in their plans of individual development. As a result, administrative behaviour got marked by loss of touch between officials and the people.

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The Fifth Report from the Select Committee of the House of Commons on The Affairs of the East India Company

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Introduction

The East India Company, established in the year 1600 for the purpose of trade in India, found itself in the role of an administrator or ruler in 1765 when it acquired the Diwani (that is the right of revenue administration) from the then reigning Mughal Emperor Shah Alam.

The East India Company discovered itself into a new role which the British Parliament (The House of Commons) set up its Select Committee to examine along with the revenue administration in ‘our India possessions’. The first four reports prepared by the Select Committee discussed the various establishments created by the East India Company for the internal administration of India offering some account of the nature and history of those establishments and of the circumstances under which they grew to their present scale. These establishments were divided into four departments Political, Military, Revenue and Judicial. The Fifth Report of the Select Committee of the House of Commons on the Affairs of the East India Company submitted on 28 July, 1812 is exclusively devoted to the establishments directly concerned with the revenue and judicial departments. The authorship of the Fifth Report is attributed to Samuel Davis and Officer of Engineers and who in 1784 had accompanied Turner on the latter’s Mission to Tibet as far as Bhutan .

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Written by upsc aspirants

January 20th, 2012 at 9:56 am