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Report of The Committee to Review In- service Training of The IAS officers

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Introduction

The Committee to Review in-service training of the IAS officers was set up in September 2001 and it submitted its Report in August 2003. The Committee consisted of seven members, all civil servants, all except one belonging to the IAS, some retired, others serving. The Committee’s chairman was B. N. Yugandhar, a former member of the IAS, and who was at one time the Director of the LBS National Academy of Administration, Mussorie. Incidentally, the committees set up since the nineties of the last century are all getting manned by civil servants with little representation from the outside public life of India . They mostly functioned like internal reflection groups.

Summary

The Committee’s terms of reference were to examine the efficiency of the existing in-service training programmes for members of the IAS and make recommendations taking into account the problems faced in the present manner of implementation and also the recommendations of previous committees set up for the purpose. The mandate given to the Yugandher Committee was thus severely limited: the Report claims purely local temporary interest.

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Written by upsc aspirants

February 27th, 2012 at 7:27 pm

Committee on Civil Service Reforms

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Introduction

The Fifth Central Pay Commission, 1997 had considerably raised the emolument structure in the Civil Service wanting it at the same time to become more productive, accountable and ethical. The latter objective was not achieved. On the contrary, the popular image of the nation’s Civil Service was becoming poorer. The Government of India wanted to improve the health of the Civil Service by its several interventions in the last decade or so. In 2001, it set up the K.P. Geethakrishnan Expenditure Reforms Commission, which made detailed recommendations to reduce public expenditure. In August 2000, the Civil Service Examination Review Committee was set up to suggest improvement in the examination system of the higher civil servants even though this scrutiny was initiated, independently of the executive by the Union Public Service Commission as part of its regular exercise. In 2003 the Surender Nath Committee was launched to suggest reforms in the system of performance appraisal, promotion, empanelment and placement of the higher civil servants in India . Around the some time, the B.N. Yugandhar Committee was set up to suggest appropriate in-service training to the members of the All-India services at different stages of their service careers. It is this background against which Committee of Civil Service Reforms appointed in February 2004 and mandated to submit its report within a period of six months. Matters like examination system for higher Civil Service, in-service training and performance appraised have been already examined by the above mentioned committees. The Civil Service Reforms Committee was more open ended and subsumed the earlier reports. The Committee consisted of 15 members including its chairman and the member secretary. It was a Committee exclusively of civil servants, either serving or retired. Its chairman was P.C. Hota, a retired member of the Indian Administrative Service.

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Written by upsc aspirants

February 5th, 2012 at 10:34 pm

The Government’s of India Clerks’ Salaries Committee

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Introduction

Discontentment on the part of personnel in an organization is gravely injurious to its image and productivity. To this end conscious efforts are made to monitor and redress the employee grievances. The Government of India has shown its concern for this problem by the appointment of Pay Commission from time to time.

Summary

The Government of India appointed, in July 1908, a Committee, to investigate the complaints of the clerical personnel working in the secretariat to find out if the prevalent scales of pay were found insufficient to attract and retain man possessing the requisite qualifications and to suggest suitable measures for remedying the position. This Committee, known as the Government of India Clerks’ Salaries Committee, had as its members J.S. Meston, G.B.H. Fell, H. Hudson, H.N. Heseltine, Sarat Chandra Banerjee, Maula Bakhsh and C.W. Caston, the first named being its Chairman. The Committee submitted its report in December of the same year.

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Written by upsc aspirants

January 27th, 2012 at 9:38 pm

The Royal Commission upon Decentralization

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Introduction

In India the Provinces came into existence first and the Central Government came much later. What was then known as the Supreme Government could emerge only under the Regulating Act of 1773. Following the transfer of power of governance from the East India Company to the Crown in 1858, the power and functions of the Central Government in India began to expand steadily making the provinces more and more dependent on it. Governmental administration was becoming growingly centralized. Centralisation touched new heights under Lord Curzon, Viceroy of India during 1894-1904 and 1904-05. Departments after department, service after service was over-hauled. Principles were executed and standards were set causing excessive concentration of authority in the hands of Central Government. The Central Government had imposed detailed financial and administrative restrictions on the provinces, which fettered them in their plans of individual development. As a result, administrative behaviour got marked by loss of touch between officials and the people.

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