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Report of Satish Chandra Committee on Civil Services Examination

with 2 comments

This is full text of the report of Satish Chandra Committee (1989), 692 pages in original . This may not be fully legible due to an error in the old copy of the report but should still be useful for anyone wanting to study the changes it suggested in UPSC CSE examination. If you badly need the report, do mail us and we may be able to help.

___________________

PWE8 
CONTENTS  i-vii 
Preface   viii-xiv 
CHISPTER-1  Introduction and brief history of the Competitive Examinations for recr!.iitment to all India and Central Services.  1-17 
Higher Civil  Services in  Indi3.  2-4 
Scheme of Separate Ccmpetitive Examination in the pre bothari Sysrem ot CAS stc. Ezamination.  4-53 
Cvrrent scheme of the Civil Services examination introduced from 1979 on the recommendationr of the kottiari Commi ttee.  8-12 

 

( 1.04)  Recrluitment Ssrvicae in  to the higher Civil some advanced countries.  12-17 
CHAPTER-2  Method of  Selection-. General  Issues.  18-27 
CHAPTER-3  BacLgrcund  of  sctccessful  candJ.dates.  33-37 
(3.01)  Economic. Educational and ii’ural/Urf?an background of candidates.  29-32 
Women candidates.  52-39 
First  class degree holders.  T5-56 
Candidates belonging to the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes.  35-:1 
CHAPTER-4  Common E::aminaticn €%,amination.  or  Separate  38-70 
Katicnale of  a  Common  Examination.  39-43 
Indian  Rdministrative Service.  43-ab 

CHCIPTER-5 (5.01)

(3.02)

(5.03) (5.04)

(5.05)

(5.06)

(5.07)

(5.08) (5.09)

(5.10)

(3.11)

-ii-

Indian Foreign Service.

Indian Police Service.

Indian Audit and Accounts Service

and other Accounts Services.

Revenue and Taxation Services.

Delinking of some Group A and Group E

Services.

Structure of the Civil Services examination. Basic Structure of the Common

Examination.

Should professionals such as doctors and engineers be allowed to compete for the Civil Services examination. Weightage of General Studies and

Optiona1 Subjec t 6.

Essay paper in the Main Examination. Optional Subjects.

Negative Marking in Objective Type

Tests.

Introducticn of Lectures, Group Dixussions,Psychological and Aptitude Tests in the recruitment procedure.

Interview Test.

Age Limit.

Number of attempts to be permitted to eligible candidates.

Allotment’ of Candidates to Services after the Foundation Course. 46-90

50-37

57-62

63-64

64-70

72-1: 72-76

76-70

79-40

80-83

83-92

92-93

94-101

101-114

114-117

117-121

122-126

CHAPTER-6 (6.01)

(4.02)

(6.03)

(6.041

(6.05)

Tab1s-1 TablQ-2

lab1e-3

Table4

lab1a-3 Table-6

General Recommendation.

lime cycle of the Civil Services

examination.

Geographical Distribution of Candidates. Centres of Examination.

Dissemination of Information regarding the Civil Services examination. Sy 11abus of the Civi1 Services examination. STATISTICAL TCIBLES

Monthly income (in Rs) of father/guardian of selectees of Civil Services examination 1984 to 1987. IAS etc. examination/Civil Services examination: Success ratio of women candidates.

First class degree holders amongst.

successful candidates.

Numbers of Candidates belonging to the scheduled castes and the scheduled tribes. who were recmmended for appointment on the basis of the results of the Civil Services examination during the period 1979 to 1987. Number of candidates of the scheduled castes and the schedl-(led tribe sElectea under general standards in the Civil Services examination during the period 1983 to 1997. Comntonality between the merit list of IAS/IFS t Central Services and IAS/IFS & IPS in the IAS etc. examinations from 1975 to 1978. 127-142

128-132

131-135

135-137

137-140

140-142

143-294 144

145-146

147

148

147

150 -iv-
Tab10-7    
Preference of successful general candidates for services based on the index of initial preference.
Table-8    
Candidates recommended for Group ‘E’ Services.
Tab11-9    
Recruitment by IAS etc/Civil Services examination (1930 to 19883.
Table-10    
Number of doctors and engineers selected in the IN3 etc/CivilServices examination during 1977 to 1987.
Tab1e-11    
Coefficient of come1ation Of recommended and non-recommended candidates (i.e; candidates called for inter-view test but nat selected) of Civil Services examination 1983 to 1987.
Tab1r-12    
Performance of selectees in the interview tests of Civil Services examinations 1985 to 1987 according to rural /urban backgroud.
Category-wise and sex–wise age
distribution recommendey and not-recommended (1.e; candidps called for Interview Test hut hot select-ed) candidates of Civi1 Services examination 1994 to 1987.
Table-l4(A) Flge-wise distribution of place of
to14 (F ) birth/residence of sel’ected and not- selected (i.e: candidates called for interview test but not selqcted) candidatek for Civil Services examination 1984 to 1987.
Table-13    
Number of Candidates with age more than 24 years who got selected in IPS during the Civil Service examination 1984 to 1987.
Table-16    
Service-wise and category-wise number of selected candidates with age more than 26 year during the Civil Service examination 1984 to 1987 according to location of school etc.
131-152
153-1 54
135-157
158

159

160-161

162-169

170-181

102

183-1.94

-V-
Tablm-17

Tab1e-18
Tabls-20(1) to20(30)
Tab1e-21
T+b 1e-22
Service-wise and category-wise 185-18i5 educational back.g round of fatherlguardian of selectees with age mare than 26 years in the Civil Services examination. 1984 to 1987.
Service-wise and Category-wise 187-18E monthly income of father/guardian of selectees with age more than 26 years in the Civil Services examination, 1984 to 1987.
Merit rank-wise number of attempts 189-196 made by general selectees of the Civil Services examination. 1984 to 1987.
Age /sex -w i se dist r 1but ion of 197-25t selectees and non-selectrees (i.e, candiates called for the Interview Test but not finally selected of Civi1 Services examination, 1985 to 1987 according to number of at tempts.
Number of Candidates selected in 257

various attempts in the Civil

Sorvices Examinatim 1984 to 1987.

Distribution of top 200 merit rank. 298

,haldersof Civil Services examinations.

1984 to 1987 (according to number

of attempts).

Centre-wise number of Candidates 259-262 appeared and recommended during 1984

to 1987 in the Civil Serv,. ces

(Preliminary) and Civil Services

(main) examinations.

Top ten Universities (according to 203-26C-number qualified) in the IAS etc. examination 1974 to 1978 and in the Civil Services examination 1982 to 1983.
-vi-
Tab10-23  Number of candidates appeared, quali’fied and their success ratio at the Civil Services examinations, 1982 to 1986 according to language medium as. alternative medium for  267 
answering general optional papers.  studzes  and 
lab1.-26  Performance of Civil Sewices selectees, who got selected in first attempt, in general studies and optional papers of Civil Services (Main) examinations, 1984 to 1987.  268-269 
Table-27(A) to27 (B1  Zone-wise number of candidates appeared, qualified and Success ratio for Civil Services examination, 1984 to 1787.  270-27 1 
Tab 10-29  Number of 111, IIM and FIIIMS graduates in the merit list ot Civil Services examinations, 1981 to 1981.  272 
fob1e-29  In different brackets of merit rank, number of MBPS. F.E. or B.Arch. Candidates selected in the Civil  275 
Services 1986.  examination during 1984  to 
Table-39  Performance of enqineers and ,ibctors (genera 1 selectees) in general studies and optional subjects of Cwil Services (Main) examinations, 1?84 to 1957.  274-275 
Table-Jl(A)to31(D)  Place Of birth/residence of selectees and non-selectees (i.e.;candidates called for interview test but not finslly recommended) of Civil Services examination, 1984 to 1987.  276-279 
Tab1e-JZ  School background of Civil selectees for the period 1987.  SerrZices 1984 to  28(:)-281 

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(R)  Performance of selectees and non-selectees (i.e.1 candidates calLed for interview test but not finally selected) in general studies and optional subjects during the Civil Services Examinations. 1984 to 1986.  282-293 
Tab1e-54  Percentage of marks obtained topper and bottom rank holder scheduled tribe candiates.  by of  294 
APPENDICES  295-67 
CIpprndix 
I  Notice dated 12th SeptembeF-, 1988 regarding appointment of "Committee".  296-298 
I1  Questionnaire drafted and issued by 299-579 the "Committee" ta high dignitries, Senior level State Government officers, Cadre Control ling Authorities, Academician et.c. 
I11  Changes in the scheme of IAS etc. examination/Civil Service examination from 1947 to date.  580-590 
IV.  Services for which recruitment made through the existing scheme the Civil Services examination.  is of  591-592 
V.  Extracts from the booklet on Civii Services Selection Board (CSSB),published by the Civil Service Commission of U.K.  393-605 
VL.  F;ecruitment France.  to  Civil  Services  in  606-631 
VII.  Names of high digniteries, senior State Government officers. crade controlling authorities, Academicians etc. with whom committee had discussio~s. 632-662 
VIII.  Summary of recommendations.  conclusfon  and  66Z-673 
********l* 

PREFCICE

We -were appointed by the Union Public Service Commission on the 12th of Septpmber,l988, to review and evaluate the system of selection to the higher Civil Services introduced from 1979 in pursuance of the recommendations of the Committee on Recruitment Policy and Selection Methods under the chairmanship of Dr. D.S.Kothari (appointed by the UFSC in February.1974) and to make recommendations far further improvement of the s;/stems having regard to the needs of varims Services. We were also specifically requested to examine the need for:
( L 1 inclusion of some additional subjects, oartic~~lar1.y mev3ica.i siubj.ectc;, in the scheme of the Civil Services E?hninati@n.’ end also exclt.i%=ii’onof any subject prescribed ear1i.er-.
(ii) in trodisction of lect~\res group discussions
psyrhol.ogica1 and apt.ituJc tests,etc. in the recruitment procedure for the hi,q her Civi 1 Services.
We were required to submit, qur rewrk withln a period of si:: months from the date of our initial appointment on the 12th of September,i988. A copy of the
notification of the UPSC in this regard is at bppendix I.
-vi ii-

-xiii-
formulating our views. We also took into account the opinions of the heads of training institutions and senior officers, who have either trained the young officers at the post-entry level or have supervised their work. in different assignments. In addition to the above modes, as we wanted to have a first hand impression about such officers, we met a good number of them drawn from different services and working in different parts of the country. We also collected data relating to the background of candidates and the scheme of Common Examination. On our request, the IJPSC readily furnished us such data. These data in the form of Statistical tables are placed at tpe end of our Report.
We  have  used the data for  the  evaluation  of  various 
aspects  of  the  scheme of  Common  Examination  and  in 
making our observations and recommendations. 

We are grateful to the Chairman, Shri H.K.L.Capoor and Members of the Union Public Service Commission for sparing their time to discuss with us the scheme of the Civil Services Examination and for their valuable sugges+ions on various aspects of the existing scheme. We are also grateful to Shri S.K. Lali, Secretary, UPSC. and officers and staff of the UPSC for their help and
-xiv-
assistance without which our enquiry could not have hm completed rn such a short time.
Dr Satrsh Chandca Chai rmnn
Shrr T.f?. Satish Chrndrrn Rember
Shrr S.N.     Mathur
f-
member
Or. K. Venkata     Rammiah Bembrr
Or. Francis A. tlenezss .Amber
Shrr C.S.     Swamrnathan Member
Shrr D.P.     Bagchi RmIbRr
Shri P.C. Hota Member-Secretar
CHRPTER-1
INTRODUCTION AND BRIEF HISTORY OF COMPETITIVE EXfiMINATIONS FORRECRUITMENT TOALL INDIA CIND CENTRAL SERVICES
-1-

1-01 HIWER CIVIL SERVICES IN INDIA

"hdministration is meant to achieve something and not to exist in some kind of an Ivory Tower, following certain rules of procedure and, Narcissus-like, looking on itself with complete satisfaction. The test, after all, is the human being and their welfare."
JMARLAL NEHRU 8 1.QlOl It is universally acknowledeqed that after Independence, the role and functions of the higher Civil Services in India have undergone a profound change. Whereas the higher Civil Services in the pre-Independence period had mostly the task of maintaining the status quo.to keep the fabric of the British Empire
intact,  after  Independence,  they  have  played  an 
important  role  in  accelerating  socio-economic 
development  of  our  country  in  the  context  of  our 

constitutional objective of growth with social justice. They have also played a useful role in providing an element of commonality in administration in our federal set-up in a parliamentary democracy. After we launched our programme of planned development through the Five Year Plans, the higher Civil Services have also provided leadership to the administrative machinery to translate
Speech at the inaugural meeting of the IIPA on 29.3.34, quoted in Jawahar La1 Nchru and Public Administration’
-I.I.P.6. New Delhi 1975.
the objectivis of the plans into concrete reality. The members of the Services have also played an important role in implementing programmes aimed at improving the
socio-economic  status  of  the weaker sections  of  the 
community.  In a period of rapid socio-economic  change, 
they  have  facilitated  the smooth functioning  of  tho 

administrative machinery under the overall guidance and direction of the political executive.
1.0102 The above tasks and challenges for the higher Civil Services were taken due note of by the Kothari Committee (1974-76) which had mentioned that to successfully meet the challenges facing the nation, the members of the Service must have not only " relevant knowledge and skills " but also " socio-emotional and moral qualities for working for and with the community". We endorse the above views and fePl that whereas intellectual attributes, relevant knowledge and capacity to innovate in a period of rapid transition are necessary for the higher Civil Services, the members of such Services must have social traits to identify themselves with the people tc make administration a participative adventure 1. To be ruccessfu1,the officers must also have capacity for hard work , honesty,
……………………………………………….

t Even the Fulton Committee (1966-681 on the Civil Services of U.K. has said that for the higher Civil Service, imagtnative humanity rometimeo matters more than tidy eff-iciency and administrative uniformity.
integrity, objectivity of approach and a secular outlook combined with commitment to the high ideal6 enshrined in our constitution.
1.0103  The  method of selection to the higher  Civil 
Services  in  India has to be viewed in the  context  of 
locating  the  likely  administrator  who  has  a 

comprehensive awareness of the tasks and the necessary potential to perform them with competence. Any scheme of selection for the higher Civil Service would be relevant to the extent it succeeds in achieving these objectives.
1.0104 A system for the recruitment to the higher Civil Service has been evolved in our country over a long period. From time to time, changes have been made in the structure to meet the emerging challenger. The last significant change in the System of examination was introduced in 1979 on the basis of the Report of the Committee on Recruitment Policy and Selection Method (Kothari Committee). The main features of the scheme introduced from 1979 as also of the scheme priar to that, arg set out in the next section.
1.02     SCHEI’lE OF SEPERATE COMPETITIVE EXMINATION IN THE PRE-KOTHARI SYSTEB OF THE IAS ETC. EXAMINATION.
1.0201 During the Pre-Eothrri system of Campotitive Examination, called the IAS etct Examination, for
direct recruitment to IC\S/IFS; IPS and Central Service6
Class-I and Class-11, a candidate had to fulfil the
following conditions of eligibility:

(i)    
be a Citizen of India (citizen of Nepal and Bhutan for Central Services only ) :

(ii)    
be 21-26 years of age for IAS, IFS and Central Services and 33-26 years for IPS, DAN1 Police Service and Post of Assistant Security Officer in RPF ;

(iii     hold a degree of a recognised University.

1.0202 Relaxation in the upper age limit was availab e for member.s of the Scheduled Caster and the Scheduled Tribes and also for certain specified categories of candidates.
1.0203 The scheme of examination was divided into three categories for different Services viz.. Category-[ (IS and IFS), Category-I1 (IPSand Class-I1 Police Service of Union Territories) and Category-IiI (Central Services Class-I and Class-II).t
1.0204 Candidates were permitted to take throo attempts for each of the three categories of Services within the permissible age limit.
………………………………………………..

t In the pre-Kothari system also there were some changes and modifivtions in the scheme of Examination, from time to time, which are at Appendix 111.
1.0203 The nSchoau of Examination" consisted of:-
A. Written Examination in
(i)Threo compulsory subjects (Common for all the three categories of Services) in the following:-
1.  Essay  – 150 marks 
2.  General English  – 150 marks 
3.  General Knowledge  – 150 marks 

(ir) Optional Subjects as fol1owc:-
Two subjects for appearing for Category 11, carrying a total of 400 marks (200 marks for each subject 1
Three Optional Subjects for candidates appearing for Category S and Cat-ory ISS, carrying a total of 600 marks (200 marks for each subject)
1.0206 There were 45 optional subjects, including 23 optional subjects on language and literature (Appendix -I11 ). The standard of these papers wa5 approximately Of an honours deqree examination of an Indian university; and
(iii)Two additional rubjectr, out of a total of 16 subjects%, carrying a total of 400 marks (200 marks for each subject) for candidate8 appearing for Category I Only (i.0. fAS & IFS).
1.0207 The standard of additional subjects for Category Icandidates was higher than that of an honours degree examination.
8.  Interview  for  the  Personality  Test  of  such 
candidates as cal led  by the Commision,  carrying maximum 
marks  as  follows: 

Catmgory I Indian Foreign Service 400 Indian Administrative Service 300
Catogory I1 Q I11 A11 other Services 200
(i.e. Central Services and IPS)
1.020e From 1969, candidates had the choice to answer the compulsory papers on Essay and General Knowledge in English or in any one of the languages
included in the Eighth Schedule of the Constitution.
1 0209 The duration of each of the written papers was three hours.
1.0210 For Category I, two additional papers of only such candidates were examined, who secured certain minimum marks, as fixed by the Commission, in the three compulsory and the three optional papers.
1.0211 Merit List of successful candidates for different categories of Services was prepared on the
basis of the aggregate marks scored by the candidates in the written examination (Raximum marks 850 for IPS & other Class I1 Police Service, 1050 tor Central Class-I and Class I1 Services and 1450 tor ICIS and IFS) and the Interview Test (Masimum marks 200 for IPS and Central Services, 300 marks tor IAS and 400 marks for IFS). (Total 1050 for IPS, 1230 for Central Service Class and Class 11, 1750 for IAS and 1650 for IFS).
1.0s CURRENT SCEK OF THE CIVIL SERVICES EXMIINCITION
INTRODUCED FROM 1979 ON THE RECOMMENDATIONS CF THE
KOTHCIRI COMMITTEE

1.0361 From 1779, the Civi 1 Service Examination conducted by the UPSC has been catering to the tdo A31 India Services, viz., IAS and IPS; the Indian Foreign Service, sixteen Central Group A Services and eight Group B Services (Appendix-IV). It is held in three stages. the first two comprise written examinations, while the third is an Interview Test.
1.0302 To be gligible for the above examination, a candidate has to ful tzl the followinq cohditions:
(i)  be  a citizen of  India (or citizen of Nepal  and 
Bhutan for the Central Services only); 
(ii)  be 21-26 years of age on the first of August  Of 
the Year  of Examination; and 
(iii)  hold a degree of  a rzcoqnised University: 

1.0303 Relaxation in the upper age limit is available for 8pecified categories. Each candidate is allowed no more than three attempts at the examination. This restriction on the number ot attempts does not apply to candidates belonging to the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes.
1.0304 The first stage of the selection process is a Preliminary examination, which is of the objective type, wit3 multiple choice questions. It consists gf two papers (each paper being of two hours duration) are as follows:
1.
General Studies -fSO marks

2.
Optional subject -309 marks

Total -450 narks
For the o tional subject, a ca didate has to choos one of the 22 subject% (Appendix-111).
1.0305 The objective type papers in the first stage arc of the graduate level of the Indian Universities. The examination is generally held on the second sunday of the month of June. The results are declared around the 31st July of the same year. By this process, about 85,900 candidates are short-listed to about 10,090 candidates., who take the aecond staqe of the examination
(i.e. the Main Examination ). The figures relate to the examination held rn 1968 and a?e broadly indicative of
the number of candidates, who qualify for the Main Examination.
1.0304 The Main Examination, generally held in Novembor, consists of conventional essay type papers as under:
Paper I Indian language 300 marks (EIGHTH Schedule) Paper XI EngA ish 300 marks
Paper III General Studies I 300 marks

Paper IV General Studies Ii 300 marks

Paper V : : 500 marks
: First Optional Subject I
Paper VI I : 300 marks

Paper VII : I 300 marks
: Second Optional Subject ;
Paper VIII ! I 300 marks

(Total moo marks)
1.0307 The first two papers (Paper I and Paper 11) are qualifying examinations of matriculation standard and the marks secured in these papers are not added to the total score. The total number of optional subjects for the Main examination is 47 (Appendix-111). which includes literatures of. 23 languages and two subjects, Anthropology and Management, which are not included in the list of 22 optional subjects included in the Preliminary Examination.
1.0308 The candidates have the choice to answer the General Studies and optional papers (other than language
and  1iteroturr.paperc) either in English or  in  any  of 
the  languages  included in the Eighth Schedule  of  the 
Cons t i tu tion. 

1.0309 The third stage consists of an Interview Test and carries 290 marks.
1.0310 The candidates are called for the Interview Test bared on their performance in the Main Examination. About twice the number of candidates as the number of vacancies in Group A and R Services proposed to be filled up in a particular year, are called for tho
Interview Test. The Interview Test is held generally in April-May of the year following the year in which the Preliminary and Main Examinations are held. Interviews are conducted by five or six Intordiow Boaras functioning simultaneously. Each Bcard is presided over by a Member cf the Commission, whc is assisted by four Advisers. Ordinarily each Board. interviews 11 candidates ( six in the forenoon and five in the afternoon) in a day. Candidates have the option tc answer questions it? the Interview Test either in the same landuage medium they had chosen for the written examination or in English.
1.0311 The Merit List of successful candidates is prepared on the basis of their aggregate marks in the Examination (1800marks) and Interview Test (250 marks) (Total:2050 marks).
1.0312 The final results are declared in the first week of June of the year in which the Interview Tcmt is held. Thus the whole process from the date of the Preliminary Examinatzon to the date of the final results, when the Merit List of successful candidates is announced, takes about a year.
1.04     RECRUITMENT TO HIQHER CIVIL SEWICE IN SOME ADVANCED COUNTRIES
1.0401 While evaluating the scheme uf recruitment to tne hiqher Civil Service in our country, it would be relevant to take note of some featurw-ot recrui,tment Ln different advanced countries of the world.
1
0402 In the United States ot America, membero of

the Civil Service are recruited on the basis of specific qualifications for a post or assignment. Gpsrt from the career civil servants, the President of USA has powers to appoint: a large number of functionaries of the Federal Government. In the American system of Revolving Door or Govert-ment by Strangers , there is a great deal of movement back and forth between the public service and the private sector. Sinco socio-economic conditions and problsms in India are different, the methods of recruitment to the Civil Service in USA may not have many useful features for adoption in our scheme cf recruitment.
-13-

1.0403 After thm world war 11, in the United Kingdom, recruitment of ‘Famt Stream’ entrants to Civil Service has been done momtly through what is known am the
"Hmthod I1 Symtem". The above uyetem has the following featurema
(i)Recruitnrnt is done through the Civil Service Selection Board (CSSB), who use the selection method known by the gmeric title of "F4ssesoment
Cmtre" .
(ii)The above method of selection was developed for selecting the administrative class after world war I1 for which the long established conventronal type of written examination was not possible becaume of disruption of formal Uru<ersity education caurrd by the war.
(iii)In Method XI, there are no conventional essay type papers and candidates are asse6sed over a period of two days by the CSSP through a battery of copnitive tests providing standardised assessment-of specific intellectual abilities.
(iv)    
In the CSSB, aswrsment over a period of two days is done by a term ot threc assessors, comprising a serving or retired senior civil mervant, a psychologi’st and an-observer.

(v)    
after carrying out vrriouo tmst. of an objective type, the three members ef the CSSB also test the candidate’s motivations, interest and-experience, intelleetual abilities and potential, through separate Interview lusts.

(vi)    
Candidates shortlioted by the CSSB by the above procedure are sent up to appear before tho Final

.     Selection Board (FSB). FSB holds interviews with the ihort-listed candidates spread over a day and finally select those 6Uitirble for the ‘Fast Stream’ *.
1s0404 While assessing the method of selection adopted in the CSSB for Fast Stream entrants to the
*-
Civil Service, the following features may be noted:
(i)at present, in UK a very small proportion of bright students regard the Civil Service as an attractive form of employment.
(ii)Assessment by CSSB is done through specially designed job-related objective tests and exercises,
(iii)     Interviews both ak the level of the CSSB and at the level of FSB play a very crucial role in the selection of candidates.
fi-note on the mode of recruitment of ‘ta3t stroa.cn, entrant6 to Civil Service of the United Kingdom through the CSSB is at Clppendix-V.
1.0403 In France, the scheme of recruitment afmembers to the Civil Service through the Ecole Nationale d’Cldministration (ENA) has the following features:
(i)    
The French Civil Service&% has two broad sources of recruitment, namely, the sxternal and internal Candidates. External candidates are universit-graduates, who should be less than 27 years of age. Internal candidates are those who are from the lower echelons of service, have put in at least five years of service and are less then 56 years of age.

(ii)    
Both external and internal candidates are selected to join the Ecoie Nationale d’Cldminist-ration (EN&) through two different systems of Entrance Examination. Both the systems of Entrance Examination are, however, heaviiy weighted in favour of subjects related to administration such as Economics, Pubiic Law, Social Issues and International Clffairs. Interview Teats and Personality Tests are also included in the scheme. of Entrance Examination to ENA.

(iii) Every year, about 80 candidates, selected on an equal basis from the external and internal
8s In France, a candidate is permitted three attempts at the Entrance Examination to EN&, which is similar to the number of attempts permitted to a candidate for the Civil Services Examination in India. Cl note on recruit- ment to higher Civil Service in France is at Capmndix-VI.
candidates, join the ENA at Paris for intensive training of two years.
(iv)     Traininq at ENA consists of academic work and artschment in Government and private industries. There is a process of continuous assessment of a candidate throuqh the entire period of tra:ning. The final merit-rating is done at the end cf the twcr year period. CandidGtes who qualify ia t!-e merit-rating are asled to choose differen: ssrvices based on their merit and preference.
1.0406 Even though the Frencn Civil Service has been considorsd sttitable tot-the French system of government. there havs been some criticism of the mode of recruitment aric! tra1n:r.q of the civil servants thrcuqb
b’

EW.     The mdin points of criticism arc? as t~I:=ns:
(a)    
The system of recru:.tinent throuyk ENA produce-, a class of civil servants who ars extremely elitist. They are conscicus of their supericr intollectual attribcctss acd their assursd roia in key areas a* the Frencri Government..

(b)    
Sincs the prospects of rlifferent catogorros of civil services differ in France -the highest status being that of the Grand Corps -the common system of training at EN& often does not result in promoting a spirit of harmony among different classes of higher Civil Servants, there beinq aggressive ccmpetition amcng the traicoes asoirxc;

to be     at the top of the grade.
(c)     Graduates in Science and Technolagy arc not a part of the generrltst service because in the Entrance Examination. a degree in subjects related to administration is necessary X.
S The generalist Civil Servants constituting the Grand Corps are CouneeLl d’Etat (Council of Stater); Inspection dec Finances (Corps tor verification of the State’s Finance and w:penditure) Cours de Comptes (Court of Public Accounts) and Corps Diplomatique, Some technical Services ziuch as Civil Engineers.ctc. are almo members of Grand Corps but they are not recruited
through ENP.
CHAPTER-2
WETHOD CF SELECTICN t GENERfiL ISSUE9
-18-

2.01 METHOD OF SELECTION -MNERAL ISSUES
2.0101 The primary task assigned to our Committee is to review and evaluate the system of selection to the higher Civil Services introduced from 1979, in pursuance of the recommendations of the Kothari Committee and to make suggeotions for further improvement having regard to the needs of the various services. While addressing ourselves to this task,, we have to look at the present syitem 1-1 zts different aspects.
2.0102 F:rst and fcremost. the selection process has tc be gearsd to the 7equirement of the pc;sts fcr whieh Yhe se!ection is being made. Simple as this appears. it turns out to be quite complex when viewed against the fact that the higher Civil Services in India discharge tasks of a highly diverse and varied nature. In line with the steady enlargement of governmental activity specially in the economic and social spheres. the members of the higher civil services, besides performing regulatory functions. have direct responsibility for the imslementaticn of a variety of developmental programmes. Even within a givon servicg. the nature of assignments which a member of that service holds during the different stages of his career. varies considerably. It is well recognised that in a developing country like India, which is endeavouring to advance on a wide front -social and economic. the bureaucracy has a majcr rolo and function. The All-India Services have a further :inique role, in the sense that these services are also .conceived of as one of the instruments to forge nations! integration end to provide a link between the Centre and the States, in our federal set-up. It is siqnif icaqt that the Administrative Reforms Commission, which carried out an extensive review of the adminintrati~re set-up in India a few years ago. did not recommend an’/ major change in the structure of the services. Mcre rc.>cently, the Sarkaria Commissicn has favoured the contt-iuance of the presect prttern of Ail-India Services.
2.0103 Given tnis sitaetion. what the higher civil services need are I-:>? specialists in nerriw disciplines,
but  persons drown fran a wide  base.  They should  not 
only  be  persons  with  a high  level  of  intellectual 
competence  but  also  ha%e  strength  of  character, 

integrity and aptitude. which would enable them to discharge their. responsibilities in an effective manner. They should nave committment artd dedication to the objectives -:.nc! gGJiS embcdied in the Constitution. Pursuant o’c this, they should have a committment to secularism and democracy and the maintenance of the unity and the integrity of the country. They should be imbued with the high ideals of our history and culture. —ti of=-*’r; tie sucic-ecanomic inequalities which
with the poor and the socially oppressed.

2.0104 Does the present system of examinations meet these requirements 7 The system followed in our cortntry right from the middle of the 19th century, has been based on the prsnise that d young person of proven intellectual competence can be equipced, through appropriateiy desiqned progranmes ot post-entry training, with the Cnow!sdqe end sl.ills r-equirea far the particular service to which he is assigned This concept has. remained unaltered tnocq): the pattern of the examination may have uniiergone changes from tims to time in regard tc csr-tain ccjmponmts of its strc,cture. Th? Kuthari. Committee did not deviate from this basic approach; within the framework. the rocmimendatr’cns were designed to iinprove the eff:cacy of selectson ty
introducing snccessive stages af screening.
2.0105 Thnrsfare, the Sasic issc;e &,ch our Committee addressed itself to is whether t.-e ~iitternot a common Civii Serrices Examrnzticn iri operation durinq the last decade, has socceedeo in ilei.~rifyinq candidates who combine in tel lectilal zasabii ity ai?d t:s reqciieite traits of personality. . Whzle examining ti-iAr aspect, we cannot iqnore the fait that ths wcrld over. %>ereis a trend t.owards professionalisation in public administration. There is a point of view that this Process is inescapable as economic activity grows in volume and complexity. 65 governments piay an
increasingly interventionist role in order to achieve broader oocio-political goals,therc is need for a constant upgradation and prcfessronalioation of the bureaucracy. Viewed from this angle, the question has to be asked whether the scheme of a common Civil Services Examination is still valid or whether there should be separate streams of selection for distinctly iaentifiable groups of services.
2.0106 It is sometimes suggestad that, on the analogy
of the pattern followea in the defencs services, we
should pick out bright students at the ochool leaving
stags, place them in soeciai institutions. which will.
provide the relevant education and develop functional
skills. Such a system will undcubtedly provide to the
services high calibre professionals moulded to suit the
needs of the services. Whether such a pattern can be

followed  for  the  civil  services,  considering  the 
logistics  of  screening  hundreds  cf  thcusands  of 
candidates  and  the  disparities in  the  standards  of 
education  at  the  school  level,  requires  careful 
consideration. 

20107 There are other features which are unique to the Indian context. We not only have a federal structure but people of various ethnic, religious, linguistic and regional groups compose the fabric of the Indian nation. In a society marked by a high degree of
pluralism, it is important that the selection process provides equal opportunity to candidates from all parts of the country and different segments of society to take their chance and compete for se,ection to the higher Civil Services. It is eqiialiy important that the process of selection does, not handicap in any manner the candidates whose stluc,ational opportunities have been const-ained by Icw family income rjr’by tke rural-urban differential which is quite marked even at prrssnt.
2.0108 Since ir! our country. job apoorti.tnities acs linited in rclaticn to the number of persons seeki?g employment. selection to the higher. civil szrvLces must, needless to sav. be scrLipu2aualv
correct. The aethodolugy of sel.?etitm must also be pnrcaived tc be fair not mly by tkz candidates, but by the 9uklic at
large.

2.0109 While seeking to fulfrl rhe above criteria. one has to tak9 note of the practical and logi-stic aspects, In the Indian situation the process of selecticn has to be so oesrrjnea that it can screen iarge numbers of candidaten within a reaocrnably sncrt time. This is a real issue consi32r:ng that the number of candidates competinq for the hir,her civil services is of the order of lOO,OC1C. Besides. the fact tnat university standards in India vary considerably has also to be taken into account and the scheme of exammatian has to
candidates from a large nU1nb8r of universities.
2.0110 Under the present system of combined Civil Services Examination, admission is open to candidates drawn from varied academic disciplines. The structure of the examination has therefore to be ouch that it enables candidates drawn from different disciplines to compete on an equal basis. It has also to have components which test knowledge, comprehension and awareness in areas extendinq beyond their own disciplines, as these bring out the mental calibre of the candidate. In operational terms, this means a proper balance in the ymightage attached to the tests related to General Studies as against optional subjects on the one hand and that between the written papers and the Interview Test &I the other.
2.0111 The Committee has examined each of these issues and its recommendations are rot out in the chapters which follow.
2.0112 While arriving at its conclusionsI the Committee has taken note of the selection erocedures followed in other COUntrieU such as U.K. and France, the details of- which have been set out in an earlier Chapter. It is significant that even among the advanced countries, there is no uniform method of selection. Depending upon histatical circumstances and its own cultural factors. each country has evolved its method of
selection. Stated differently, there is no scheme of selection which a priori can be considered to be suitable for universal application. While we may draw lossons from the systems of other countries, our decisions have to be attuned to our needs and our cultural milieu.
2.0113 It is significant that in the United Kingdom (which provided the initial model for the Indian examination system), the selection of candidates to the administrative class is no longer made through the traditional system of written examination and reliance is placed who.lly on the comprehensive system embodied in what is called Method 11. This system, according to some studder, has proved succeeshl. Nevertheless, it cannot be repiicated in India. While the number of aspirants to the administrative class of the British Home Civil Service is small enough to enable their being screened through a battery of aptitude testsi, the sheer numbers which the selection mechanism has t= process in .India makes this totally impracticable. Besides, as we have discussed in detail in a later chapter, there are reservations about the effectiveness of psychological and aptitude tests in closely grading candidates in a highly competitive situation. Such tests have yet to be developed and validated to a degree that they generate confidence and have universal acceptance. We have also to remember that sophisticated tests, with which the
candidates from rural and relatively lesm advanced parts of India are not familiar. may discriminata against
them.
2.0114 The French system has an aitoyetner different orientation. Academic qualification in subjects such as law and sccial sciences is a nandorory pre-requisite for eli3ibility tc conueth for t.5e ti.~ii Service. This undoubted:y has the merit af brirq~nq in candi.dates with knowIedqe in iocci.ali:o~ ares5 vhiih. will to r-elevant. to their .f*.tti-trswork. But. hers *Gain. SLKC:, an aporoach w=~,ldnct suit tne Indlai-c_.z~?.tg:.:t. Firc;t, in India the diversity in the fi~hctions of the higher Ctvi1 Serviczs is rnuc;? greater. Seccncl ly . openinys to hiqijer Civi! Servic..ts ars r*=larively i i.q~te.: and the members of these ser-kices enjoy high stati;s anc? presticje in society. bie cancat dasrivr larqe ..Tiii;5er: 5’ candidates edklcatod ii: dr f fe+-?nt disciplines fro: competinq far the hiyher Clvii Serv:ces. Frascriptim of a iilnited number af subjects as an ?5s9ntial qualification for entry iztn tbe higher Civil Seevices wsonld tend to narro:v the cocia! base C? %?+e serviczi which is totally undesirable in the national cocte::t.
2.0103 It is intaresting tc note that u’apan. witn
a highly industrialised economy, follows a selectrcn
procedure similar LC that adopted in India.
2.011e The scheme of the civil services examination in cur country hi3 ti) he rtewed against the present state of socio-econcmic development, the political structure and the system of university education . It has t3 take note of the large number of aspirants for the Clrgner civil services, a substantial propor"i3n nf whcm belong to ‘ the aecnomically disadvariti;tqed SCCI:O~S of society and have a przdomi,iantly rural background. Our effort wculd.
therefore. have tc be tc iinprave upon the prctern of recrciitms*it whrch >as evolved over a izng por-:OQ of time? rether thsy to discar-d.1% in f.svci.;r. of 1 5bet.rin nuict-rd in an alieir environment. To.repeat a point mads Fdr-iirv-. WE-have alzo ts ensure tk& tfis scisct-or prcc~a~..-:~ ac.zpcs tc a: zsndi6atee
;j_;r..s-.-;.~r=. 1 potChtia.1
acd c=mtnaP,d=, the r~,nf:donce of t5e people cf thz

cuun:.r.:.
CHAPTER-3
SACKGRWND OF SUCCESSFUL CAN0:DATES
3.01     ECONOMIC, EDUCATIOIWL AND RURAL/URBAN BACKOROUND OF SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES
3.0101 On the basis of data supplied by the UPSC, we analysed the income levels, of the parents of successful candidates (Table-1). The data from 1984 to 1987 indicate that about 20 percent of the general candidates, about 55 percent of the candidates belonqinq to the Scheduled Casts5 and ebout 48 percent of the candidates belonging to the Scheduled Tribes were from the low income group 8.
3.0102 On the basis of the data furnished by the Uf’sC, we also studied the performance of the first generation learners. i.e. candidates whcse parents did not have any formal education. in terms of their success ratio in the Civil Ser.Jicos E .amin.~tion for ths four years 1984-1987. whicn indicates as follows: Year Number of first generation learners
who qcalIfied in the in the merit list

Main Examination and of suc c essfu1
appeared for the cand idates.

Interview Test.

1984 95 19
1985 194 85
1986 189 7s
1987 102 66

8 For the-relevant data. income below Rs.1000/-per month during 1984 and 1989. and income below Rs.1500/-Per month during 1986 and 1987 have been cateqorised as low income group.
3.010? The above Jat.1 show that a significant percent; gs caf the firct’geiierat.ion learners, who are cvident!y frcm the pcor .4nd dupriked sections of
s-ociety.  h&ve  not.  cnlr  got  over  their  obvious 
1rmltat:o-s  but  hdve  ‘ioc. essfully  competed  in.  an 
irite! lac t-itall,  r igoruus corrpo*ti.ti. +eetawination. 

3.0104 be made i. 51:cdy rJf tto background of success-ul cardidates ir the Civil Senices Evamination in terrs 01 (a) place cf birt.h. (b) place of school
educaiit n (nciJar time e6ent -and (L.! I-lace of r.esidence af tor :I. qher sec:onrjsi-y ft?uie :ion. F0.r making the atoke study, we hiic to dep,enc upc.. I the data collcrcted by the
LIFSC  fi om  t.be  candid. :ee  .no q-..alified  in  the Pair: 
E: :&mir&:imi  ard appe..trec  fcbr  the  Ir:ter.\;ew  Test. 

3.0105 3e manner 1r ~I-Lc:: tke UFCC categorired tn: c.itiec. towrir and ,zillage: duri-ig 19E.a and 17R3 is sc
1:o 11.OUlr, :Q) CIT ES: E’omSay, Ca;cuttR. Delki, Plidras. Qhemdatad. 9anyeloi e, CtisndigarCl. F.\dw.md. Jaipcir.. Luckriow. F’atna itrid Fmt . I:R) l’?L.NS: 6611 towns is pe-the 1981 i:enscrs 1.e. all statu1:oi y towr s with a f.cmLc ipe: Corpor.ati?n. Mcinicipa: RoarcI! Ian?ofin.ent Foard cr FlJtified arE’a committee.
1. c) <‘I1 LAGEB: Other ihari :ities and towns as define: above.
3.0106 In 1986 and 1987, however, the UPSC left it to the candidates to rill up the questionnaire and mention their places of birth, places of schocl education (major time spent) and place of residence after school education as ‘ village’ town and city .
In the process many of the bigger towns might have been cateqorised as cities by the candidates.
3.0107 The percentage of successful candidates ir, terms of their places of birth were as follows:
Year     Percentage of successful candidates according to their places of birth.
Oi 1 1 ages Towns     Cities
ioej 40.5 40.8     18.7

1985 A.1 45.7 iB. 1 LO86 76.4 51.a 31.8

1987 30.6 1.1.9     37.5
Since a fair number oi towns would be notified areas, tnese would be only semi-urban in character. Cn the basis af the above taole. we can therefore say that a sulptantial number of successf**? candidates had a rural backqound, and this is a welcome development.
3.0108 On the basis of the relevant data, we made an attempt to assess the percentaqe of successful candidatees who had their major part of school education
in villager, towns and cities. (3ur analysis revealed the followlngr
Year     Percentage of successful candidates who had major part of their school education in
Vi 1lages  Towns — CLties –
1984,  26.0  46.9  27.1 
1985  23.9  46.9  29.1 

1986 23.6

2..;..;
45.2

1987 19.8     6 47.6

:*-a

3.0109 As can be observed from the ahove table. not ooly, ic. terms of piacc of airth but in tern6 of wP.efe they hid the-major part of their rct.cl.cX education, d fair pt oportion of scccessfu! candidates have c3mi. either. .;rorn villages or small towns.
3.02 WOMEN     CqNDIDATES
3.0201. ‘he number csf su:cessful women candidate5 in t3e h.-gher Civil Ler.-,i:es has been increaz:.-.c progresr ively (Tab:e.-Z). Whe-eas in 1951 chefs were cnl, four wcmen candidates (1.7X) among 271 candidct.e? rccommei ded tor the I;.S ar.3 other Civil Services, in 1371, c7 women candicatrs (12.4 %) were among S4ci
candidates recommended for the 1AS and other hipher Civil Services. In 1987, the number of successful women candidates went up to 120 (14.7 percent) out of 817 candidates recommended for IAS and other higher Civil Services.
3,0202 The number of women candidates who have been appearing at the Civil Services Examination has also been increasing over the years. The number of such candidates who appeared in different years. vi:.. 1960,
1970 and 1987 were as follows:
Year  No. of women candidates  Total candida-tes appeared  Percentage of women candidates to total 
appeared  candidates appeared 

1960 r.72 5877 2.2 1970 454 677.0 6.7 1907 10449* 88098X 12.5

3.0203 Not only were women candidates ouccsssful in the Civil Services Examinatioo. but some of them havs also come in the Merit List with very hiqh, positions. The +ollowing Table Lndicates the number of women candidate durng 1783 to 1987, who came in the first
100 positions in the Merit List :
These figures refer to number of candidates who took the Preliminary Examination.
Year No. of     women candidates in the first 100 positions in the Merit List
198: 14
1984 15
1983 14
1936 1s
1987 18

3.0204 The resultr of the 1988 Civil Services
Examiration, which is the 1 Itest. indicate that among the ?.uccessivl candidrtes 16 percent are women. ihia percerbge orcghr to go cp. Ihere is nr. quota for wcmer. in the CivxI Service. E::.xmination roc is it be;riq cfemanc~ec! by women thrmsc 1ve1.. tlcnsn c;ndidatcs comcete and s~creed the basic of their merits; in fact, the
or1
percer t.icje crf SLICC%SS amo:ig the wonit-? cand;dates is higher than that for their mile cauntarpi!r-ts. The res.1 problem lies in the fact that ni-t a su+flcien: prcpor tion of women grccuat +s are attr.xted tot-ares t’.e higher Civil Service ;s 3 career. In t5.e Central. Servicec, ttiEre ic 411- Indi 1 transfer 1iabiilt.j. Ttere
is nE-ec! for evolving d mc-o libera; prr_)ccdure t!:an
obtairirig at present. 01 pcsting hustsrd and wifa in the same c-ti.tion. The prir.caFlec-of cadre iilccaticn for the A1 1-Ir dia Sen ices are c Isc athe-riaid. We recummeric. that frr wonibn CandidatEs, special principles cf cabrc allocition .m&y be consicared. If the policies reLatins
to women candidates recommended by us are implemented, and given adequate publicity, we feel that a larger number of women candidates than at present may take the Civil Services Examination.
3.03 FIRST CLASS DEGREE HOLDERS

3.0301 We came across an opinicn that the higher Civil Services in India ari? no longer able to attract the best talent and that aver the years, the attractiveness of the Civil Service has declined. We found, however. that in terms of acodemic standards as judged by the number of first class degree holders whc ha.ie been appearing ii7 the Civ r: Ser.+iczs Exarnicatian, there ~PS been no decline (Table-:). The following Table indicates the percentage of first class degree holders ancng the Successfui candidatec- in the Merit List:
Year Percentage of 1st Class degree hol2erz in the Merit L~stof the Ci*.,r 1 Services Examinaticn
1979 51.1

1980 54.9
1981 54.5

1982 6ii.S
1983 64.1

1984 16.5

1985 67.8

1986 67.0

1987 69.0

3.0302 It is not far us to say whether the standard indicated by the first class has itself been eroded during the period. The UPSC, on its part, has to depend on the products of the Universities and the standards set by them.
3.04     CANDIDATES BELONGING TO THE SCHEDULED CLISTES LIND TilE SCHEDULED TRIPES
3.0401 In terms of recruitment of candidates belonc ing to the Schecbled CastEs and the Scheduled Tribez. for the higher Clbil ‘Service in the pcs%-Kottari system, the statutor) rejciremen t has alwdvs teen ful+illad. We found that &!ILng the oer’icc! 1079 to 1507 a tof $1 number of 7YG I:an3 :dates were recommended fo* varxocts ser\f>ces or. 9 he 5as.is of the Civil Servlcui E::amiroa’ ion, out af WI.IC~34:Z csndiJates helunged :.:: the <leiera1 c.ateQory. 1220 belonged to t3e Scheclc le.: C.3strri and 6.55 b+’.sr,qer: t=, the Schcacilei Tri ks:. iT~!bb;t,-:.).
3.0402 :t. is enrocitagirg tc? note that a 3ood number cf cirri~.lidatrz-belcnyirig t.c the Schetlulca Castes ancl Schedulrd Tribes came :.nts the Merit List by ger.c!re? stand’trls (T,.ble-S). Lie fqund that clurinG the peciod
198.3′:0*1987. between b Ijercant t? 16 percent candidatnc
.. belcrqi.1g tlJ the Scheckile castes came into the Mw-r?
List h: genuva! srandar.ds. Dur rng <he corrsspondinr;
period, successful candidates among the Schedule Tribes. who qualified by general standards varied from 3 percent to 9 percent. During the abcve period. some candidates belonging to these categories also sccred more tnan 62) percent marks in the Common Examination (Main Examinat~ons and Interview Test) and came within the first ten candidates in the Merit List.
CHAPTER-4
COMMON EXAMINUTION OR SEPrARATE EXAMINATION
4.01     RATIONALE OF CI COMMON EXCIPIINCITION
4.0101 In the present system. candidates are selected through one common examination and Interview test and are allotted to different services, based on their ranks and preference. Since the tasks to be performed by the officers in various services are quite divcrsa in nature, it is sometimes qciestiooed as to whether the selection procvss shouid nor be ditferent for different Servrces havicg regaro to the special
skills and aptitudes needed for each.  Alternktively.  it 
has  been suggested by  some  t5at  the ser.di=es  COU!~  be 
arrarqed  in separa*.e ~V-OUDS Q?  s6r’vicca  as faiIour5: 

(i)ICIS and IFS iii) All 63qcount3 Servicss SCIC~ as the Indian Audit and
Account Ser-vLcs. Indrai C~vilAccounts Service. Indian Fost and Taleqri~ph !Accoi!nts Service anc Indian Defence Accounts Service.
(iii)     All Revenue Services such as Indian Inccme Tax Service and Indian Central Exise acd Customs Service. PI1 w-tiforined Servicss * s~chas Indiar. Police Service, Assistant Coinmandmit of CirJF. Assistant Security Gfficer of WF. (111 other Central Ser,,?,ces Group A in the .zurrent scheme of the Civil Services Examination.
4.0102 With such re-grouping, it is suggested that while candidates for all the services could be first tested on some common papers cf General Studies to assess their attributes of comprehension and analysis. specially designed optional subjects/paperr should be prescribed for candidates in different groups, to test special attributos appropriate tc different services.
4.0103 Underlying the suggestion and its variants there are a number of assumptions e.g. that (1) some of the services are generalised in nature and some others specialised. (ii) that the choice of subject made by a candidate ar the uviver..iit.j level or as an cptional subject shoala be a decisive indicator- to determine fcr which serviac or croc!p of services he will be eligib?e to ccmpets. (iii) that skills and aptitude4 ceeded to perfarm the tasks of a service or qroup of services can be tested through s~tch optional papers, and (IV) candidates can be expected to limit their aspiratians tc one or two of tne groups of services.
4..0104 We have carefully considered al; these issues. iJe find that the administrative structure is such that whereas every service has certain distinct and special tasks to perform, all of them hava alsc a generalist character. In the discharge of their tasks .they enmesh with each o*her creating the unique fabric of the Indian Civil Service System. also. officers holding posts at policy making level in the Ministries
of Government of India are drawn not only from the cIl1 India Services but also from various Group A Central Services. The cadre controllzng authorities of the Accounts Services have pointed out that their officers, for instance of the ‘Indian Audit and Gccounts Service or the Indian Civil Accounts Service. are not mere acciuntants but play the role of an adviser or critic on financial issues and should have an awareness of the whole gamut of State and Central administration. The Revenue Service officers are not just tax collectors but as they rise higher they become part of a body of economic administrators and pol .icy makers. The Indian Police Service Officers are an intcgral part of the civil administrative .rtructure and not just a security force like the oe$er,ce forces. It has been pointed out to us that these services are nit technical services
IiLe the EngAneering Cervices ar the Medical Service. There is considerablc for-CP in these arguments.
4.0103 Unlite in the case of the technical services, such as medical. enqiceering etc. there 15 no professional education that the unimrsitiss provide which is appropriate for equipping candidates to drscharge the functions of these services. Study of Political Science or Fublic Adminzstratron or International Law or Commerce could be just a little more useful for the tasks of one or the other a6 Compared to the rest of the services. But we do not
believe that the quality of candidates recruited for the individual services will improve by making a restrictive provision that they should have studied specific subjects at tne university level or should offer these as optionals. Experience has showr! that not only students of science and humanities but a130 engineering and medical qradrci..tes have performed remarkably weil in inoividual services. It has been shown that. for doveloping professional ccmpetence traininq both at the induction stace and subsequent appropriate staqes he5 gr2ater value than testing
through particuiar optional pauers in the competitive
examipation.

4.3106 In any C~SE. we cannot ov~rloc;the res.iit.! of the large numbers 04 highly qitai ifLed w-tisbri~t’/ graduates and posit-gradi.r~tes in veriocrs disciplices who aspire to anter the Civil Services through an oper. competition. Their preference far a particular sdr"-‘ics is .decide0 by the prestige, the job content. job satisfaction, career prospects and other fact?rs on
.*
which they place importance. Practically, all of them aspire to get into prestigious services live the. IbS. failing which they would like to join one of the other services in their owr. order of preference. Thus, most of the candidates compete t6r the I&S/IFS group and quite a few of the other groups. It is neither feasible nor desirable to shut out such cornpetition. Further, since, in any case. there is no strong justification to lay down pre-requisite qualifications for separate groups, we feel that the balance of advantage lies in retaining a common e::amination .
4.02     INDICIN ADMINISTRATXVE SERVICE
4,0201 During our visits. we were toid by soae senior officers and other distingiAished persons that fcr the IAS and IFS, where the candidates are required to exhibit hi jher rntel lectcial prof ‘czency ana leadership. there shculd be a separate scheme of E.:amination wirh extra SiibJect5 and a higher hezqhtaqe for the Interview Test. briefly. the trgumsnts ad\.drIclzd in suppcrt. .Sf
this v-ew were as foilows:

(1)     iAS is an All-:ndia Service. which is requsred to man the ks.v pcsrtions in the field as weil as ;n the Secretariat 00th in the State Governments and the Government a+ indla. Gn IAS offrcer becomes a Collector and 0:strict Magistrate quits earlv in his off-ciai :areer. Since the distritt is the pivot of admihiatration, the Collectur/D:strict Magistrate is required ta co-ordinate the worb ing of governmental and non-governmental agencies with divergent fm-tctAcns and programmes. For efficient performance as a co-ordinator, he must be selected
at the stacje of initial entry 07 the basis of
superior abil-r ties. Such abi 1ities may, therefgrey
have     to be assessed by a more rigurous competitive
examination with extra subjects and with higher
weightage for the Inter-Jiew Test.
ii)     During their Service career. IAS officers hold totallv disparate jobs. Hmdlirig these with competence reqiiirer higher intel Iertual attributes for a quick comprehension 0.f the requirements of a new job and its key result areas.
(1.1~)    Under the existing Rules, 40 perc9nt of the senior duty pcsts af the 163s in any State are deputation posts. !AS officers have to periodically ccme to the Centre on deputation. While under Centra! decutation. they draw c!.pon t5eir vast Trdd experiencz In the States to advise the Central Govermm?nt in arans :~f majcr polic.;t forsulatr?n and imp 1.2rr.m ta.k ice.
(iv)    
CIS a premier Servico, the IAS provider a vast reservoir of administrative talent. OifiGers of IAS work .in chcse proximity tc the political executive both at bhe State as we!l as the Centre. Their rcle demands <reator resilience of mind and higher flexibility of approach.

(V)    
In view of the unique role and iunctions of :AS an0 IFS, compared to other Services, the Csntral

Pay Commissions have invariably recommended higher scales of pay for these two premier Services.
4.0202 We have carefully considered tne above arguments. We have already mentioned that in the present scheme of Common Examination, candiaates occupying tBe top positions zn the Merit List join the IAS and IFS. Ever: in che pre-k’othari system of separate examinations for different Services, about 90 percent of candidates in the Rerit Lists of IASiIFS were also on the top of the Merit List of candidates for the Central Services and the IPS (Table-6).
4.0203 Elsewhere in this Report. we had also noted that there is a high pcsitive correJation between the marks in the written papers of the Main ExaminatLon and the marks in the 1nterv;ew Test scsree by candidates occupyinq the first 100 positions ic the Merit List. in the Civil Services Examination. The first la>O candidates in the Marit List almost invariably Join the IAS/ iFS. c1 mcdified scheme with extra aubJects/specialised Interview Test to assess bright candidates by more rigorous standards may ‘not vield
.’
better result5 as the same 100 candidates are a’iqo likely to come in the Merit List of the modified scheme for recruitment to.the IAS and IFS.
4.0204 In the scheme of separate Examinations in the pre-Kothari system, the top rankers in the Merit
list were recruited to the ICIS and IFS. In the scheme of Cummon Examination and Interview Test introduced frcn 1979. the top rankers in the Merit List join the IAS and IFS. Therefore, there may not be an/ substantral benefit to be derived by madifying tne scheme of Common Examination 3: Inter-Jiew Test in favour of a separate scheme of more rigorous written Test and Interview Tests
for the IPS and the :FS.
4.03 INDIAN FCREIGN SERVICE

4.030; We ha‘/? alrsady indicated that the scheme of common e!<aminaticn has been able to recruit Drignt candidates to the higher Civr 1 Services includirq the IFS. However. since =in ?FS offizur has to play an important role abroad in protectins the country’s interest, and d so projecting her image, we have, in view of thE spec fic rPauirements of the silrvrc4. giren some thouqht. tz the question whgther the current scheme of rscriiitment to the IF’S through the C:vil S.ir-vices Examination needs any ‘modification.
4.0302 Srcadly speakng. the quality of eotrants tc the IFS has not declined after 1979. The Index of Initia! Preference for General Cacdiaates (1982-8’7) (Table-7). indicates that IFS was the second most preferred service among the snccussful candidates. It
had the same preference before 1979.

4.0303 The Merit List and preference for service of general candidates during 1982-87 has also revealed as
follows:
(a)    
The Candidate, who got the coveted first place in the Merit List invariably joined the IAS, whereas the first candidate for tne IF5 had a position in the merit list ransing frcm nine ta thirty-three.

(b)    
The candidates recommended fcr appointment to the IFS have brer: within the first 45 to 121 3,csitions in the Merit List.

4.0304 We feel that the scheme of recruitment throug5 a Commm E::amination and Interview Test is not responsible for the declinicq preferericp for t:ie Indian Foreign Servrie. The cause +or t:he :owor preference fcr the !FS as csmparsd tc the IE appears to 1-e elsewhere. As in ths case of ot.?er services. the preference of chz cadidates fsr the IFS aeocnd’i ‘3-their-perreptian c: the job content. jcb sat:sfxtitx and also the career prcspects that the IFS offers. The socio-ecorbomic background of t:?e cirdideteo has alic a role tt 2lay in their cboico of s=rv:cz. i-loroGvPr,, t?w
.‘
oppcrtmities for forcign travc.: ave’ the ‘fears have beccme wider; this 1s no Longer .an e:=ment tliti.ig t>ie choice in favour of the IFS.
4
0305 A suggestion was mads that s;nce off-cors Of the IF5 are meant to be career diplomats,. they snould have better potential for effective intoractlsn with
people in foreign counrries having wide cultural diversities. To assess this potential, the Interview Test should have higher weightage in their Case and thewe should also be a minimum qualifying mark for such a test. There was also a suggestion that since a career diplomat deals with policy options in the rpecirlised areas of geopolitical strategies and nultilaferal aconomic issues. tne aspirant for the IF3 shculd ho tssted at. the stage of the Main Examinatim on extra subjects such as I :A) internrtlanal Trade L €conomics
(b) Internatima! Law (C! Intsrnationr: Relations
4.0306 Wg.pr9oo.s to tai:.e up both the suqgestiuns together. E:sewhere in thri Repcrt. we have indicated that in the system uf Common Eraminatrso for the hrgl-or Civil Services intrcdrcced frcm 197?, t!n?re is a hrSh correlatzao bcatueen tho scores in t!?e written examination and Interview Test among the frrst IW candidates in the Ferit List. Srnce :FS continue% t.0 have the second piace in tke inds:3oi initLa1 preference .of Qenrral canbidatms and since there art only eight to nine vacancies every year in the IFS to be fiiled through direct recruitment, a fair pcoporticn of tho firrt 100 candidates in the Merit List joins the IFS. Therefore, canoidateo who join the IFS by and large are not only those with high intellectual attributes but are
-49-
also those adjudged as higher than average in the Interview Test.
4.0307 We were also given to understand that the quality of candidates who have joined the IFS in recent years has not shown any deterioration.
4.0300 It is a moot question if the situation of declins in preference for the IFS can be changed by a1terinq the structure either of the written examination or of the Interview Test. Even if additional papers are introduced in the Main Examination and higher weightage and minimum qualifying marks in the Interview Test are prescribed For the IFS, thg quality of candidates recruited to that service-might not show any s-ubstanti.al chang&, given the perceptlons of the successful cahdidates.
4.0309 While admittedly a sound knowledge of international relations, international trade and economics and int.ernational law, will be necessary and useful for diplomats, it is arguable 1.f recruitment should be limited to those NhO have studied such subjects either at the university level or those who offer them as optional subjects in the written examination. 4s the scheme of Civil Services Examination aims at getting the best among the university graduates through a competitive examination, any modification by restricting the field of selection to the IFS to
candidates who have studied only certain subjects can lead to a dilution in the quality of recruits. Resides, in the ccntext of contemporary international relations. kmocrledge of a number of new and emerging disciplines. say, in tnc fields of science and technology, could be just as valuable fcr succesofitl diplomats. We also feel that kriowlodge of subjects, which are considered essential far a succPssfu1 csreer in the IFS can be provided .dt. the pcst-entry staye and in-service training at various et.+ges of the professionai career.
4.0310 We are rnformed that from 1988-89. a full f ledqed :ristitute f3r pr9frssiond: traininq for the IF5 has started functioning at New UelhL. As rt has a past-entry training scheme of orre year fcr young qntraots the relevant Lnowledqsr and skiils far the IF5 C?R be imparted at the stege of initial inductinn.
4.04     SNOSPlN PCLZCE SERVSCE
4.0401 As one of the A:! Inoia Service5. the recruitment to IPS is oone through the,Civil Services Examination. WhLie ebaluatinq the mods of recruitmarit to the IPS, through the current scheme cf a Common Examination, we took note of the foliowing:
(i)     From 1947, direct recruitment to IPS has been done through the IAS etc. e::amination.
(ii) From 1979, when the scheme of Cornnon Examination and Interview Test was introducmd tor a11 catogorier of highir Civil Services, ruruitrnmt to IPS continuad tc be done through the Civil Services Examination. It is also the pcsition tQddry

(iii)The scheme of Camon Egarination introduced rincm 1979, has ensured that officers of IPS and other higher Civil Services have common quailtie8 of character and intallect. They am from the cammom stock of University Graduates.
(iv:     The Gdminrrtratrve Reforms Camismion (1972) was in favour cii a tumncn s::am-ratron fcr ali higher Civil Servicss. The proporai was impleawntw clit.&r the !.oti’lari Commr tter reconmendsd thq same.
(v:     ?a fndsx c+ Initial Frefrrancu (labia-71 tar h;g%rrr Ci~ilServxes cf ;*nerd1 candidates ic the Yerri: List Trcm 197Q-53? shows that except for me year .i.e. :9@9. IPS has bum yeneraily the third praterred service a?ter the IaS and IFS ma has keen abl+ to draw a:; candrda:er cf high merit.
4
0402 Agaip.8t the above brckpraund, We kerrd the views regarding moditscation of th existrng %=heme of cornmop. uxamination for direct reerurtmmt ti IPS. The important points rairvd by those who suggested a modrfied uhm were as follows:
(i)    
The IPS receives candidates from the Civil Services Examination, many of whom do not give their first preference to it. A separate examination for tM IPS which aims at testing the special attributes for service in Police will bring more highly motivated candidates into tho IPS.

(ii)    
IPS officers require leadership qualities ot high order for a uniformed Police force. In the f.ield, three officers are visible symbols of authority. For such a visible Service mere intellectual qualities as assessed in a pen-and-paper-test end social traits etc. as assessed in the Snterview are not adequate. What is to be assessed, apart from the qualities mentioned above, is a flair tor police work. Such a flair can only be assessed if the common competitive examination is modified to include specially designed tests. Such tests might be a battery of physical, psychological and other tests on the line of tests for recruitment of officers to the Armed Forces through the Services Selection Board (SSB).

4.0403 We consulted a good number of senior’ Police Officers and others on the above suggestion. We were told that such a modified ncheme woQld. have the following demerits : ti) Candidates competing for the IAS and the IPS come
from the same stccl: of university graduates. They would continue to do so wlicttsr the sxarnrnatisn is
combined  or  separat.2,  their choice  of  sitrvice 
depending  upon  its  career  prospects ~  image. 
emoluments,  etc. 
(ii) The  IPS  tco  needs  candidates  with  a  h;gh 

intellectual calibre er.d d sensiti.ve understmdinq of societal and dsvelcprental oroblsnns. in tSe ccmbineu Ci.vi1 Ser\:ices ‘E::,tc;,,>ticn the .d L f :zr-.?ca in tho calibre of the \.ar-ious successfcl c&ndrda+ss LE narrqw. This en=tbie~the IF’S LC select candiaatzs ot a hlyn ca!ibre whc unc!rr-qo .a
rigorscts i.,ot:
good     off zcer3.
(11::     Thcsc who ecter anv c,? t3e h15her .3i./:i Se-..:c.a.; do. 52 a-d izo!r,o.jr&tivrl.: earl, -i’:ag-= i.: 1 iI=
~GC.:
therefore t:Tere is nc uppcrtzti;:,f for ass.?ssiFsq their fitness +c:-a!-:% o.+i-t:Ac.J:dr przfss-jr;.;. %>r forminq il kr~~ts:.~.=r:~y their
estirnat:? of ah: i L? 1?s fcr-any part;c:.;iar ser’r~te. ,2 yc:.rg oersar. fresh from the Uri1~ecsit.)nay i-n.,a ::E attri~+-~?.zsfcr pciics wort but >e may not msnifoijt. t’:es;? immediate:y after the completion 3f tha iJnr .*=r%it.f courses, anc may nct ti-erefix-e be able to comoe&.e sLic=essfulI./ in a scheme ci . campet~tive e::amination w:th specza!ly desiqced tests. Thus I potentiailv competent IPS officer is likelv tc 2e eliminated at the threshold.
(iv) The respective roles of the Army and the Police Officer differ so vastly that it may not be expedient for them to have either similar or identical modes of recruitment. In our society, the powers, functions and authority of the police are strictl.{ defined under the laws, and the police are accauntable ta their superior officers, the courts of law, the legislatures and above all to the public opinion. The soldier, in contrast to tho policeman. is the embodinent of the ultimate sanction of force, which is necessary for any gos.ernment. even the most. decocratic, for the protection of its terLtoria1 integrity. To succossf~iliy discharge his .aLities, the soldier must hat/= totallv differentb’attribut~~s. tramin9 acd cut1@ok. !v) A separate examination might erode the image af the IPS in ::erms of intollectual competence. In the pre-t::.cthari system of e::aniinations, candidates who opted f3r the police service were requirsd to take only two optional nc.b:ects whereas in tRe Central Swvices. the candidates had tz oger three optional subjects. This system wa2 criticized in a conference of Inspector Generals of Police in 1968. The Administrative RePorms Comm;ssion rscommended a unified examination for
the IAS and the IPS and the Committee on Police Traininq appointed by the Government of India
undor the Chairmanship of Dr. H.S. @on,andorrod the r.ccmmondation, whrch uas ucopted by the Kathari Committee.
4.-* have CdrOfUllV CM%rdQrsd the.. various arguments. 1-a srdarrtr :h+ptrr, m have discuswd in dotail t3m derirabrlrty or otherwi%e of introducing psycholcgicrl and a,pt:tuae tests a3 thu rur;lr%nent procaouro for Gt.e hrgher Civrl Smrvires and have arqued 8grrnut thm intr-odr;ction O? ouch tests at th8 prsrenr stage. Rmqw-ding t3e otner aspects. zn our carnacn. tne t8.k. to be handled by tt.9 ;ol;o bave qrow bcth in cmnpimjtv and varrsty over en4 years. Tho jot as no lmgw ccnfsnw to crime cantrol and arintmancp of law and ordrr in tho trodrtianai ionre. Thr arariabilrty Q: ropnrst;:-?ted tcc3rZiogv r~n grstly imerovro commur;rcation to tne crimiBia?r *as made even t-e trrdicaoni: r=Ie ot tho psl :co ir.cre.asrnqly intr-cate. hazar&n*a mil ar&loG,. :‘he po:~ee today 5as tc %houldur enoi-rous respcnsrbriity in rtr role a5 me s? tho importafit iristr.montu c+ SCCIS~ chmg8. 30cfal justaca md duvrlopmznt. ft has eisc to OI mmsitive ts varroljr tansions and cqcrtlicts wisanq Out of tne rapid social and economic devmlopmental procr%sem. It has to ensure thaf these tmmians and cmfiicts eo not irad to the drrturbance of poace mc! tranquilrty thoreby hindvrinj the process of development. The IPS has tS provide 1.81mrShlp to various rungs of the pclice ma
internal security organisations and play an important part in the perception and conceptualisation of the threats to social peace, the country’s integrity and to devise and implement measures to handle such situations $,
4.0403 An effective performance of this role calls for high lntel lectual qualities and awareness of complex societal issues among those recruited to the service. While there is no doubt that the members of the IPS, given the ardous nature of their jobs, do need to possess a high degree of physical fitness and Jtandards. e.:poriencs shows that the present scheme of the common examination has enabled the IPS to attract bright candidates possessing a good mix of the rcquisits ihtellectua! as well as physical attributes. Thin is Oorne out from the fact that the officers induct9d into the service throuqh the scheme of common examinations have, after prsoer training, been able, on balance. to cope with the challenges facing them, some of them ezhibitzng conspicuous valoccr while leading their men in
various situaticns.

S The Royal Co~mmissron on the Police (1962) in their Interim Report had suggested that the quolLties wnich go to make good policemen are ” physical toughness. mental alertness, a long established reputation for honesty and fair dealinq, tact, kindness, courtesy and a sense of humour"
4.0406 Any change that brings the requirement of physical attributes into undue focus at the cost of intellectual qualities is likely to deter intellectually bright candidates. from joining the service thus adversely.affecting its image and efficiency.
4.0407 We have already mentioned that the IPS is accorded a comparatively high rating by the candmates. This remains even.;ftor they are allowed an oppcrtunrty to revise their original preferences. Therefore, it is
possible  to  conclude  that oniy those  candidates  who 
percelvc  themselves as suitable for  the IPS  Join  this 
service.  9uch  willing  candidates  ariz IrLe!y  to  be 

matersal of good qusliry to be nicLc1ded for multifarious and often exacting police duties.
4.0408 To sum up. auv view is that the e:?:sti?q
scheme of Common Examinaticn and Interview ?not dces not need any modification wAth a view ta itnprovinq the quality of recruits for the IPS.
4.05     INDIAN AUDIT AND ACCOUNTS SERVICE RND OTHER ACCOUNTS SERVICES
4.0501 At present, officers of five 6scounts Services of the Central Government are recruited through the Civil Services Examination. Theee Services are as
follows:

(i)
Indian Audit and Accounts Service

(11)
Indian Civil Accounts Service

(111) Ind1.m Posts and Telegraph Accounts and Finance
Service
tiv) Indian Railway Accounts Service
tv) IndLan Defence Accounts Serkice

4.0502 Officors of the Indian Audit and kC3untS Service, which is under the Comptrollzr an3 Auditcr General ot India, conduct the audit of transactions not only of the Centre1 Government but also of all State Governments and Union Territories. They audit the transactions of all the Ministries/Departments of the Central Governaent, even thougk the responsibility for maintenancs of accormts and internal control are with the cffficers of t!ie co,*t-e%,pondirlg service. -4ch ae r.he
Indian Defence Accounts Service in t.he case of the Defence Plinistry ar?J Defence cr-ganisationo. Indian Railway Accounts Sfr.iit:e in t.he case of the [linist.r*/ Of Railways and Railway orqanisations. the Indiar! Posts and Telegraphs FIccJiinc5 and Finance Service in the case of the Posts and Telegraphs anc! the InUian Civil 4ccourlts Service in the? case of ail other Ministries/De?artmen’s and their subordinate echelons. In respect of the corresponding Ministries/Departments and organiratLons, these Accounts servicss discharFe various functions such as ensuring maintenance of a system of accounts that wili enable management control and accountability in the
contoxt ot Parliamentary tinancirl control, internal audit and support services such as tinancirl advice. The Indian Ckrdit md kcaunts Servico ofticors ranago accounting as uell as audit functions of the transactions ot tbe Stat0 Governments in ordor to ensure tinancisl control by the respective leqislatures. At the Mrniatry level, a good numt8r ct Financial Advisers are drawn trom thew cadres. Besides. thore is a ianq
tradition ot appoir.r.ing cfficars of such serrLcmi to Secretariat posts on .deputation at var:ous levels includinq Cmcretrrres to Governmet of ‘India.
4.0304 lrsc pc:c tnese sugqesrrons to tba senior otticero and some cadre controlling authoritzes tor thmr SePviCms. iha rrspcnse was that prior kmwledge at accsunts tor these services urll be neithor necessary nor helpful. On the csntrary, tnwf rrguod. it might
limit the urotuin~sot tho member8 of tho servfcsr tor
the diverse tasks they are required to perform in the course of their career. Their argument for the present scheme of common examination and Interview Test can be summed up as follows :-
(i)    
It AS a misconception to think that these officers are engaged in maintenance o? accounts. While they are resporisible to see that proper accounts are maintained. their responsitrii itv extends beyond and includes financial ccntrol. interna! wdit. interprotaticn .o? qovernment fa-tancial reg..:latic.t\s. rendering of ?inancia1 advice. etc. In r-sspect of such functions. they work with e-ecutives a.t various. levels of the administrative hierarchy and should have a sound kncwledge of the &-ganisa t:on , funct:ocs. responsibiliijes. extent of authority. financial operdtions and ob_?ectives cf tbe offices. organisations. departtnents. Mitiistrias, etc.

(ii)    
Even in regard to the mairttenance of accounts and financ1a.i control . the technical requirements. Froceaures, rules and requ1.ations governing public finance and wccounts ar? quite different from the normal commercial accounts. No university teaches these subjects as part of its commerce or accounts syllabus; nor do the professional institutions like the Institute of Chartered Accounts. Whereas a knowledge of the principles of commercial

accounts is aosolutely necessary, this is easily
provided duripg professional training. Ev itselt.
prior knowledae of commercial accounting befcre
entry inta one of these services w~ll not mike
much aif ferenco.
(iii! The scheme of common examination provides a wide choice and attracts bright candidates with diverse academic tackground. This has been helpful in the daveiapmeot 6.f ,the requisite com2osite ski!is. b:nowlt76ge of public administration and finacciai c:mtr-ol. e.j wei 1 as the breadth of ci.:t.loo~~ nsedec! for +inancia: .nanagecrent and financial advice. .Air5 ti:e c’dr)~; di,,s:.r.l-i’:cation of t::e f.mrt.roris ct governinef-t as ais3 t?.e aqencies anu 35ject.ives in*.ol’/ed in t?c detiloy,ne~t jt F*Ab;ir fur.Js. cfticers of t;-.e~e?.ervi.ces have t: trive b qcor: grasp cf tho pciiciss. principlss and procFzdtirbs ano a i.rer: finaccini SP~SEic crest-Lo st-5cir-e tF.at the pr=gr->mmes are cost erfectize. It wcuig OM dlffiCiij.t ts achleve these DbJWCtlveS Cmfinlng recruitment tc these ~:tna restrictmi *re* of sperialisaticn. E::per:ence ind;catec-that prisr i.:nowleC~e c;r training in ccmmcrcxa! accounts has not led to better quaiity of psr+ormanca. By pravidinq officers of high intellzghnce and general abi1ity the reqciiiite technical <:nowledge
cf audit ar:d accocmts. it has been possible t3
produce rmwlts, while making effmctrve usm of tho technical pmrsonnrl which thm departmts prov ide .
(vii)     Quitoa largo nurnbmr mf officers of such services tunctioris as financial advisers in thm Ministran of 6ovmrn.mnt of India. Serera also hold other deputation pcsfs. up to the levml of Surstaries tc the Bover-nmnt. It has beQn pcssible to get oftlrrrs of such calrore tor the Acrcuntr serviCeI on!v by having tho rrc.ruitmoqt on a wrdr, basic. By rertrict.r;iq the competition to a lilmitod grou~. quai-t.y will siifter.
4
0303 we feel that tl:crso arqumento hawe conriderab:r +or-. Ye do not., tner3+ors. wi..ik t:: dLctrrra tile pr’esN%+ryotmn of rocrc:tmmr.c. Gt t-fs Sam!! tiine,wu wculd like to mphaoi:e t.clu imsortrnce of pr~fmssronaltrdmrng at tsr induction :eta tha se~-*::cos. A:thcugh. we hav3 nut been ablo to stuc:r ths oetsi!+ cs training grwn to the prcbrcroners at tnmso Scramti group 01 Serricrc-. we wovld ::ke tc oBser%u mat training ehoult ncr only be directed to providznq knowleclge of rules. codes and (?rocQdur+s but skouid alrc provrde a good qrarp of the principims of financial
manaqement, a     r~s~onsi*.-m
deep understanding cf public administration, a comqrnlrensivm idea cf finaneial ma1jtsis and control and management in othmr systems.
4.-REVENUE AND TAXATION SERVICES
4.0601 Out of the 16 Group A Services tor which candidates are recruitmd through tha Civil Serircss Examination, two services, vi=. tnrl Indian fncorne Tax krvies and the Indian C~;stoms and Can.tr.1 Excise Service have a comparatively high prrfwence amoi7q tke SUCCeSSfL;l candidatas. Data relatiny to the pwicd 1979-e7 indicate that, by rrd 1awBe. these twa servx3s are tho few’.,-and the fifth in the order Gf prefsrence ot succeref*.~.c\candiCafrr ifrbie-7).
thrs si:$~rrit;ar!. No daucz. fsr %rpcses 2f’ ks:: coI!ect:cn, cff-crrs 5bou15 not. or.1.i hare a ~zcx knouledgo of the lrrr 09 ts::o:icr b:rf alie cs t~e
c
princ~~les
and aractics sf accountancy. A?. sr9sm:!
.
such kncrledge is imparted at the stage o? traininq. Since the services attract candidatus with a kqn mentai calibre and gsrnrrd1 abilities. these has Sem no dif ficu?t.y in ttreii acquirinq tbr requioite kficwledge Of
accountancy an2 tax laws durinq termrng. The cadre
controlling authorities of the two services have also pointed cut ta us that if the recruitment is restricted to profesional Ac=cc.,itaiits or Commerca graduztos. the quality of officers may not te quite as good. Also, as the officers rLse to the polLcy makinq level, they 5hou:d have a good understanding of the processes of development 5s also the operation of econcnric forces. Therefare. tne; ccnsider that t.he present r,vste:n of select:on through open competition among briqht university qradi.ates and rhen getting them trained is jusLilied. We agree -me. therefore. retcomtnsnd that
thece sc+r.Jic=s s>.at.iId continLte AS ;.art of the Civi: Ser-.,i=*sE..~iii-nsC:un.
G.07     3E-LINM:NG CF CRCW .’a” SERVICES AND SCHE OROUP "A" SERViCES FRIH THE SCHEi3E OF CCMHCN EX~MINATICN
all the 27 services at present or whether some
rationalization is possible.

4.0702 hie Wlii first e:.:arnine whether the Group B
Services should cmtinue to ho rec-ui.ted thraugh tne
Civil Services E::ambnaticn as at present. The number cf
officers CT Group P, r=craited yeor-wise during l?eT-i37,

(Table-Bi WJS as follsws:
Year humbrr rscsmmended ?or

Group 8 farvicms
1085 1-7
. —
1986 -_.
Servrces at-= acre ZnerDus t5i.n tsar-c of Cr%p Servrc%s.
fii) The career Brsspects of Group A Services arh
!?
distinctly Setter thar. those of Group B Serv-cas.
4.0704 Durinq our visits and di8cuSSA#rS, m twnd th8t the present practice of linking Group A rr.d 6rwp B Services in a scheme of Ccnnon Examination and Iritervieu Test doos create hrgn expectations an tmrrs ot career ProlPeCtS imong members of Group B Services which are rarely tulfilled. many candidates, who 8re allotted to Group 8 Services on the basis of their relatrvsly low positions in the Merit kist, choose not to join a% they feel that tf.ry c.an hotter their prospects olsewnere.As a result, vacancies in Group D SerbkQs renaln unfi?led
from voar :i) YeAr.
4.0705 Fi.:e-x?w, tke inc lusi=~.I+ Broup P Services in the schsrne ar :nil Czvil Sup,:css E::a:n:nation. creates a proolen ds a ior?= number of cmdidatrrr 1.e.; twelve to thirtrior. t:mes tho :;umber of vacancies to be fillad

I
ir! any year. are ocrrrenrd for-rhe Rrrn E::amrnnticn. P similar pr=r;lem wise% for the Ii;trr=.irw Test, fcr whicn the nucow ut C&cdiaatwi to be euamcnod im about twice the number at vacwncies to be tzlied that year. Therefore. if Gm*~p 0 Servicss, wirers the number ot vacancies every yew as fairly large. are Jvlrnkea trom the Civ:l Services E::rmination, there dl1 00 lesser number of candidates tor the Hain E::aminataon and the Intcrrvisw Test. Such a reduction in number is 1~Cely to improve the quality ot reluction to the hrgher Civil Services.
4
0707 Thors are same atbor IraLp A Scrvicsr sLch
8 Assistanr Commandants, CISF. wawe ic~Qioup 0 Service of Cmtra: Govorncllcsnt and thoy have been upgraded to Oroup A Servico in pursuance of reCGm?IWIdit~Of~S the
ot Fourth Central Pay Ceramrsslon (1986).
Factory Service, which do not attract sufficient number of officers from among the cindidates in the Merit List.
In terms of the Index of Initial Preference of General Candidates , these services are not ratad high by the candidates. Of ten. =andidates recommended for appointment to these services do not join.
4.0700 !n air viaw, the services mentioned above can be distinguish+ frcm the other service5 i~cluded in the schetne cf commix\ Civii Cervrcea E.:amination. The career prospects a*:ailable to the metnters cf thesc wrvicas ar.8 d!.stintrt;’/ rdrr-ow in compariscn with otter services. ‘lor? fe:+ reac? the h;g!-.er echel@ns of Governmen+; where they could be involved in the ffamrnq cf pclicivz.. 13 some of these scr~ice~~ of
the nature Cut-es peri:irm-.d is Ji !+erect 3r r-c?qu-i.–vsprson.i having reier/ant qcal;ficatians. For instance. memhers cf fhe Indian Tjrclnance Fact.>; 1*?5 Service discharge fi-rrctzons cls5er tc t:ie manaqeriai positions in a pn5lic sector undertaking rather’ than in Govern,nent. The Indian
Information Service.,  to gisie  another s;<acip1e.  ccclld  bo 
more  usefu!ly  filled  by  gcrsons  qdalified  in  Mas5 
Cqmmunications or Journalism. 

4.0709 We, therefore. recommend that recruitment
t3 these five services be delinled from the fl.~iI Services Examination. If the two uniformed ser’8iceS. five Central Servicas Group A and eight Group B Servicss are de-!in!ced from the Civil Services E::aminatzon, the number of services tar which rscruitment would be made through Civil Servicrs Examination would be only :12
including the IAS. IFS and IF’S as against 27 Services as at present. Such delinking would enabie tne Cammission to assess candidskea for the higher Civil Ser.,iccs more thoroughly. Thus it is l?.;.:ely to rmprc./e the quality of se1ection.
Assistant Security Officers of RPF Eight Group E Services viz. Oelhi and findaman Nicobar Island Civil Service Delhi and Andaman Nicobar Island Police Service Fondicher./ Civil Service Pondichery Police Service Central Secretariit Ser~ice(Suctz~n
Officers Grade! Railway Scare Secretsriat Service (Sect:.a i)+ i it:?*–, ’ Gr see)
CHC1PTEH-5
STRUCTIJRE OF THE
C’IVI L SEfiV ICES EXArZINAT iON

-71-

3.01     BASIC STRUCTURE OF THE.COMMON EXAMINCITION
5.0101 The basic structure of the present scheme ot Common Examination may be judged 11-the light of the followinq issues:
(il     Whether the Pre?iminary Examinatim is abii t> screen the iarge number of c.drwiieates to a rnanbgeable ?wnSer-.
5.0133 l*le reviewed the wcrl-load invoived in terms Of
number cf applications received for the Preliminary Examination. the number of candidates who appeared for the Main Examination, and the number called for the Interview Test (Table 9). We also saw test booklets oi the objective type questions cf the Preiiminary Examination and satisfied ourselves that, by and large, the questions covered the syliabcts and wOre evenly distributed. We fino that the Preiiminary Exgmination of an abjective type is used fzr scfeening a large riumber cf candilatrs (about 90,0iK! in recent years) yho appear ever!, yzar-, ta a manayeablz number C? 0.500 -19,500 csrididatos for the Main Eximination. The Main E;:aminstiw is of a zsnventiorra: esssy type nnice. in pr vlew, is appropriate for a competitive tast f3r the higher-Civi! Services . Most cf the candidates for t!;e higr:er Ci."r! Services arz dr.awn :roc Universities. whurq t!rey spcear-rl t tP.e ccnventiona1 es5a.f tj~pe examinations. C3r,.w.entio’l;.1 eisdv t.1;~examinatloon do test some hipher
fwucticvs of mLncl. suci? as clarity of ideas, com2rohen.jiori and csgency of thought and ~rescntational .3).’,-lis, which may not be adequately test& 5y the
i
objectAve type of samination alone. moreover e large number of candidates for the higher Civil Services are from the rural areas and small towns. and any sophisticated test of an objective type with which they 5.0104 Regarding items at (iii). (iv) and (v) above, we have discussed in detail the validity of these assumptLons in some Other part of our Report. At this stage, we might briefly meoticn that the scheme of Common Examination has no particular bias in favour of any optiona! sub;ect or group of optional sub:ects, anc? the quality of cmdidates recruited through such examinatrln bq3r-s aople testimony to the fact that it has been able .tz test praper!y the inta:iectual attributes. hiqher iacalties of mj.nd act! ths scciai traits and gcenerai awareness requirsd for thc higher Civi1 Services.
are  not  familiar  during  their  academic  career,if 
included  in the Main Examination,  is likely tc affect 
their prospects adversely. 

Intervrew T9st come to know their fina: rasuits onlv 😛 the rirz.;: wedr ct June. 5rr1ce t:ie F-.sIinir.ar.i E…,.-. .. . for the 5ucieedir.g veac starts imrnedirte!v
-pir,m~–ze
‘-
after  the  annocPi:elnent  cf  the rsraulc;  of  the  Msin 
Ex(aminat;tn  G+  the  ,=-rvi?us year.  in  the  prase-,  scheme 
candidatzs  who have q:!aiifiec!  in  the  Rdih  E::aminaticn 

and ha…o Deer, througr: the Irtervisw Test but have not come ir: tke .;lerit List, gat barely a woe). s time to prepare themrselver; r. This pnrijd cf cnr week may not be Sufficient to enable d candidate to precare properly.
3.0106 Out of about 1600 to 1800 candidates called every year for the Xnterview Test on the basis of the bin Examination, about 50 percent are placed in the Merit List of successful candidstes. Those who are not
in  the  Merit  List,  invariably  appear  at  the  next 
Freliminary  Examination  which commcncas barely  a  week 
after the results of  the Civil Services E;:amination  are 

announczd. Even some of those who arc in the Merit List, appear again at the Prelimiriar;. E;:nminaticn with the hope of getting a better positior! next year and in a miwe sreferrq?d service. in ‘Jut-estimats?. the number cf randiditas who. at prusent. epaear at the Freliminary Exsminacior? d~th time tor
barely a ~~e!:’s preparaticn. would be around 15(:iO . If those candidates are allowed tc tai..e the Fsrii %::amination the fo:lowing year without apcearing rt tkr Preiiminary E::aniina’cicn. it wculc! m5an that svery vedr as against shout 9.4300 to 9.30Q .randi.dates. abcut tG Li,0O4:; candidates
LC,3?~~~ will acpear at ti-@Main E:.:amiriatz.cn. In our virw. this would be a manageable number. ?%reover. the number cf candidates for t.?e Rain Examinaticn is likelf tc be less
i: cur aelrnkinq services
rocosmmdation~’regar~i~g of frcm tbe scheme cf the Civil Services Examination a~e accepted and impicmented.
5.0107 We, therefore. rocomsiand no major change in the present scheme of Examinations except fcr a modrf rcatron that candidates. qualifying in the Main
Examination and appearing in the Interview Test, could be admitted directly to the Main Examination of the following year.
5.02     SHOULD PROFESSIONALS LIKE DOCTORS FIND ENGINEERS BE ALLOWED ro COMPETE FOR THE CIVILSERVICES EXAPIINATXCN
5.0201 It wz%s urged be;fora us that professionals such as Doctors end Engineers should not be allowed to compete at the Civil Services Examination. The arguments advancPd fcr not permitting such professionals are as ?G1?0WS:
(i)    
Engineering and Medical education are custly and a130 highly subsidized. F’roduct.: of such costly and scbsidized edtication should not be allowed to leave thei; profession f3r a nan-technical serv.itk.

(ii)    
In view of the rap:d industrialization cf cur country, we need a large number of bright engineers t.3 ztay on in the prcfession and contribute to our technological progress. With a view to helping rapid industrial development of the country, the Government has pursued a policy of setting up and expanding a large number 0.f higher technoloqica1 and engineering institutions, and if bright candidates passing

out of these institutions are drawn into the non-technical services, there is an inherent contradiction in Government policy.
(iii)     We have an overall shortage of Doctors and we need them in our hospitals and medical
institutions.  If  such professionals join  the 
Civil  Service  they  wili  be  a  loss  to  the 
Profession. 

3.5252 Brfors we go into the merits of the above arguments it would be worthwhile to make an analysis of the percentage of candidate3 in the Merit List, who have the academic background of ecqineers and doctors(Tab1e- 19). An analysis of the Merit List of the Civil Services Examination for two years, i.e. 19l36 and 1987 reveals
itnat:
(i)     About 20% to 21% of candidates in tne Merit Lirt had the backgrowd of E:igineering .
f ii 1 Abccrt 4% to 5X of canditiates in the Merit List were Doctors.
5.0203 It is seen that i-rhile the percentage of doctors among the succk?sful candidates is still fairly tow, the proportion of engineers finding place in the Merit List is substatial. 6s table 10 indicates, there is a rising trend in both cases. However, in terms of loss of doctors and engineers to their respective professions, the entry of these professionals to the higher Civil Services cannot be regarded as large. But
it is disturbing that persons trained at substantial cost to the exchequer should pursue a career where the investment made on their education would not be optimally utilised. That the higher Civil Services still attract doctor-lj and engineers is an indication of what one may regard as an aberration in our social value system which attaches, even today, higher status to
the members of the highw Civil Services. It also refletts the disparities in career opportunities. It is desirable that thought is given to measures which may eventually correct the situation.
3.0204 At. the ~jdine time, we do not think :t wculd be correct to exclude doctors and engineers from competing for the higher Civil Services. These two streams of ethnical education attract a high propurtion of bright students and if, in their perc.eption, the higher Civil Services offer more attractive career opportunities, they should be able to take their chancps along with the graduates in other disciplines.
3.0203 We were told by senior officers and other dignitaries that as members of the civil services, the performance of doctors and engineers has been as good as that of others.
3
0206 We, therefore, do not recommend any change in the present scheme of the Civi 1 Services Examination, which permits Doctors and Engineers to compete for it.
5.03 WEIGHTAGE OF GENERAL STUDIES CIND OPTIONCIL 5UBJECTS
3.Q30P At pt-esent,in both the Freliminary and the lain Examinations the relative waightage of General 3tudl.e.s as a compulsory subject tc optional SUbJeCtS 1s
9
.-

* .-.
3.0302 The syllabus of Genera: Studies is such that a candidate is expected to have read widely and have broad awareness of different s~ibjecteof qeneral interest. Whereas the compulsory 5uh:ect cf General Studies tests
the candidate’s general awwr’Eness and range 0.f interests. optional subjects +RS: thrlir knowledge of the susbject, capacity for conprehension, iogical analysis, clarity of thought and pr-esentat.ion&I skills.
5.0303 We received a siiggeatior? that as there is no fcinctiona1-re1ationshi p betwesn the academic bac :::ground of the candidates anc: the nature of duties and functions
after  entry  into service,  it would  be  appropriate  to 
increase  the relative Mightagir af  Ceneral  Studios  in 
the  scheme of  the Main Examina-:ion.  We  are unable  to 

accept this poht of view. Cur scheme of examination, as explained earlier in the report, is designed in the main to test the intellectual competence of candidates.
This can be done effectively through the optional subjects. While General Studies do perform an essential function vit. of bringing out the level of general knowledge and awareness of current developments over a wide area, as well as the ability of Quick reactibn, we do not see any justification to disturb the present relative weightage. Moreover, an increase in weightage of General Studies could prove to be disadvantageous to the candidates from the rural areas or to those
belonging td the le55 privileged secticns of society.
5.0304 The Kothari Committee had recommended a relative weightage of General Studies to other subjects including optional subjects as 1 : 5 and 1 : 4.5 for the Frel iminary and Main Esaminations respectively . Whi.le implrrmenLtlncj the recommendationc, oi the Kothari Committee, Government. decided to have both the Preliminary and Plain Exarnlnations far the higher Civil Services with a re1ati.e weightaqe of General Sthldies to optional subjects as 1 : 2. In our view, sucil a weightage to General Studies is adequate and does Got warrant any change.
9.04 ESSCIV PCIPER IN THE MCIIN EXAMINATION
3.0401 In the pre-Kothari system of separate examinations for differnet Services, there Was a compulsory paper on Essay carrying 150 marks. For some years (1947-60), the medium of answering the Essay Paper *.was English 01117 From 1969 onwards, a candidate could appear in the Essay Paper and alsa in the compulsory General Knowledge paper in one of the Indian Languages in the E.ighth Schedule. The Kluthari Committee recognised the utility OQ an Essay Pacer ta %sst thequalities of !nind Of an aspirant to the higher-Civil Services ac?d
recommended that in the Main Exatination there sho~ild be a compulsory Essay Faper-(TOG marks? which could be answere?d either in English cr in avy One of the Indian i-ang!.:ages. Government however-I did not accept this
recommendation and that is why ir-tt.e current scheme of Cmmon Examii2’ation there is nc provision for such a
paper.
5.0402 9urinq our visits and dAacitssicmsr we were toid by Senior Offrcers and even Heads of Training 1nst.Ltutes that some of tl-e pocJt..-iS?$ entrants to the hi.y;clo*-. Civil Servicis die nut. havn nzcessary skills to ?repare a proper- Report cr a Rsport. on any specified assiqfiment involving integrated and
t~?i,ii.i~?q lingusitic SkiXIs, etc. In our view, this is a matter, whi’ch deserves some serious attention as officers of the liigner Civil Services aie expected to prepare pclicy papers, notes, drafts and memoranda on a variety of subjects. It is true that skrlls in these areas can be im.parted at the Traininy Instit.ute and also can be
dwelcped with experience in service. But these
useful skills, are mostly acquired during the academic
caremr in colleqes and Universities. Hence these should
be tested in the Main Examination.

3.0403 We are of the view that the Essay Paper in the Main Examination will bring out not only the candidate’s linguistic ekills but also capacity for comprehension, abi’lity for critical analysis. mental quality for integrated thinking, assimilation of ideas and clarity of expression. We feel that the two papers on General Studies (600 marks) in the current scheme of Common Examination are not able to do these in a satisfactory manner.
5.0404 In recommending the introduction of an Essay Paper. we we aware of the problem of unlformity of standards o? evaluation. Even before 1970, when there was only one medium of examination (i.e., English) for all candidates, for the compulsory Essay Paper, there was a problem of ensuring uniformity oi evaluation. This problem would get worse if the Essay Paper is introduced in the current scheme of the Main Examination as a compulsory pqper, where a candidate has the facility to choose either English or any one of the Indian Languages as the medium of examination. But we feel that to a large extent, the prDbXem of lack Of uniformity of standards in evaluation of the Essay Paprr can be overcome by prescribing certain criteria of
evaluation; by holding rneetings of examiners to set
norms of evaluation and, if possible, by petting the answer script evaluated by two examiners independently.
9,. 0403 In view of the obvious nerits in the introduction of an Essay Paper, we recommend that in the nain .Examination I ther-e shoi.ild 9e a compulsory paper on Essay over and above the cnmpt.ilsi;ry paper on General Sti~dies. The Essay Faper sncxrid carry 200 marks. Candidates could answer the Essay Paper in Englisb 3r 1:) my one of the Indian Lanquaqes . To ensure xiiforrnity of standards, we reccmmerid tr,at evaluatior, cT
7.1ie answer scripts on t!w Ec,.:&y F:,apzr chould taE.–. in to sccocint (i1 comprehansian ( 1 i :, or L’dI-,,.’?.i.–‘ 7
‘ .ty of tf,o;!abt (ii;j clirj:ty of expr-~+ss~i:.ni*;-:d ( LV:I integrated thhinkir-,y hith assimilation cf it::?as. $Je also re=ommend .?va?ii;+-kiz~n 3f the answer script:; ia L;W Essay Paper by t~oIndependent esaminers. In t.hi.2 2:;ystern. the marks scr>red by a candidate .jhsLiId he ti:? mean of tile two
-:,cur-es.
5.05 CPTIONAL SUBJECTS
9.0501 We have been specifically requested to e::anine whether any change should be made ir: the existing list of optional subjects in the scheme cf the Civll Services Exaininatian.
5.0502 A brief historical background of the sy’llabus of Examination for the higher Civil Services would be helpful to appreciate the relevance of optional sub~ect5 in the scheme of compstitive examination .
5.0303 In his Report of 1854 on the Indian C~vil Service (ICS), Macaulay recommended the Classics and
Lanpuage~ and  literature  as  SLISJ~C~SSbecause,  in 
his view,  a member  of the  :CS  should  have  the  mcst 

1: Macaulay’s syllabus for the ICS was as follows:
"Eng1ish Lanquaqe P, Literatur-e :
Composition
Histary
General Li teraturz
GreeC
Latin
Ft-snch
Gerinan
Ita11an Mathematics, Furs & Mixed Natural Sciences Moral Sciences
SansCrit
Arabic
Total 6875
‘I
After recommending such a syilabus, Macaulay himself doubted whether any candidate will ever obtain half the maximum mar1::s; but he felt that such a syilabus would give equal chances of success to a classical scholar who is a distinguished mathematician or a mathematician who is no classical scholar but is thorough wi-th the history and literature of his country. In Macaulay’s words, " A young man, who has scarcely any knowledge of Mathematics, little Latin and no Greek may pass such an Examination in English, French, Italian, German, Geology and Chemistry, thak he may stand at the head of the list."
complete and liberal education that was available to an Enqlishman of those times.
5.0504 In the Northcota -Trevelvan Report of 1853 so the organisation of the permanent the Civil Service, it was ;also indicated tt1s.t subjeci-..j for Civil Service Examination might be "as numerats as may be found practicable, so as to sec*-ir-e tl~greatest and most varded amount. of talent for the F:.iLiic Service".
5.O505 The emphasis sn Claesicv and Languages in the e;yllabus of the ICS and the i?ctns Civil Service ha’d
4 Iri 1926 for the ICS Examination, tbere were 7W mwk5 fur Compulsory Subjects which included Essay, Engiieh, Present Day fi.e., Current Frntlens), Everyday Science -and Vernacular Languages; BOO marks for optional subjects (total nwnber of Sa subject.s) and 200 marks for a Viva-Voce. Te.st. ?hS by l?26, instead of competing in a Scheme of Competitive E::arninati.on with a total of 6875 marks ( which Macaulay had providsdj the scheme of the ICS Examination had a total of 1701:) marks only (compulsory sub.lects -700 marks; Optional Subjects -800 marks and Viva-Voca-ZOCI marks).
3.0306 The above analysis shows that the ranqe of optional subjects for the ICS Examination was determined not cn the ba5is of their specific relevance to the work and functions of the ICS officer, bLrt on
consideration  o-f what the bright students-the  potential 
entrants  to  ICS-were  likely to  be  studying  in  the 
Universities.  Thus  in  the early part of  the twentieth 

century, when increasingly lar-ger number of bright students took. to Science and Engineering those subjects were also inclcided as optional subject%.
3.0507 When tne " I&S etc. Examination" Was intrduced in 1947, a list of 29 optional subJects was provided. For-the !FS, any two opt.Lona1 st.rbjecta and tar the rest any three of the list had to be taken. subject to certain restrictions i’n selection. The list wds amendei: by adtrl1,txons and deletions subsequently, with the result that iv 1975 tnerc were 45 optional sil.iCJect5 from which all candid,+tes had tti choose three wlth the proviso that those who compete6 only for the F’olxce Service needed tc take only two. Candidates for the IAS and the IFS had to take, in addition, two out of a list of 29 higher additional optional subjects, mak153 in ail five optional subjects for these two ser-vices only. The combination 0.f optional and additional sub;ects were subject to certain restrictions.
5.0308 The Eothari Committee, while reccmmendxng a common scheme of examination for a11 services with
writt rn examinations (r,amely, Preliminary and Main) ar:d an Interview Test, suqgerjted that candidates for the Prizliminary Examination should offer on@out of a list of 19 optional subjects and thc5f tor the main examination should offer two out. of a list of 47 subjects. The lists were preparzd by the tf&thari Ccmmittee on the ba5is a? r,ubject_s generally taught in the universities at thrl degree level so that bright iandidates frnm a wide am’s $25 selection would SE aB!S to compete. The Kothar-i Ca:n:!ii I-t.ec observed that " the list of options;. sut.ject:s shor;13 be neither-5c restricted as to discouratp proxi.jiny candidates from tai.::J.ng the e..:arnina.ttion nor t.30 larye t.o seriously affect l.ini+ormity of Staildar-ds Thc Comrn.Lt",e also felt tiid?
‘I.
SLIbJects in which the number st zzmpeting candidates WG~ r-el.+,tively smal 1 should b~ i,?&u;i less there wer": etrnng rea3ons to the corrtrzry.
7.0504 At present, the !is+ cf optional subjects :cr
:%e Preli.minat-y Examniaticn iiiirludes 22 5c:bjects. which
are tau.ght at .the first deqr._;e level af the Inciar;
Vniversitie%. For the !.liiir-: E…ainination, the 115:
contdins 47 subjects includmg ?.iteratureof one of 29
1anquac;e.j (1.z. 13 languages included in the Eighth
Schedule of the Constitcrtion plus English, French,
Sernan.. Russian, Arabic Per-5ian Chinese and Pali). I)f
the 24 subjects, excluding Lanquage and Literature, 22
are common( with variations ii ccntent) to both the
Preliminary and Main Examinations.  Subjects which  are 
available  for  the Main Examination,  but not  for  the 
Freliminary are Management and Anthropology. 

3.0910 From time to time, the UPSC receives requests for adding to the list of Optional Subjects. Generally stated, the argument for inclusion of additional subjects runs along one of the following lines. One type of argument .is that a discipline has Seen completely omitted. Another is that one branch of knowledge in a discipline is air-rady in the list and so another branch shouid also be included. The third is that the study of a particular branch of knowledqe, which is not. already included, cculd be nf some use in certain circumstances for a particular service. Each of
t.hese arguments has it5 own logic.
3.0511 We hawe been asked to examine the question of f.Lir.t.her addktion to the lists snti also suggest, ~f necessary, deletions fram the existing lists. Ws have looked into this question carefuliy acd have discussed this wkth the UPSC and with senior officers of different organisations as also with many academics. Whi!s there is a general feeling that proliferation of subjects will be undesirable, views on the inclusion and exclusion of any subject vat-*/ considerably.
5.0512 It is clear that administrative problems
connected with the setting of question papers and

evaluation of answer papers increase tremendously with additions to the list of permissible optional subjects. The problem of maintaining unitormity of standards between subjects also becomes harder. Further, given the tight time table for ccm’pleting the full process of the scheme of examinations from the Preliminary examination to the publication of final rcsults after the Interview Test, additional strain is caused to the system when the list of optional subjects
is augmented.
5.G513 While it is true that the Civil Services will stand to benefit by inclusicn ot mare subjects wh1.c.h the 2rightest among the students take in the Universities thereby widening the area of cadp&tiiicn to candidates of hiyh potential, it has elso to be bcrne in mind thet the same prsceps can.:%ad tn .et c:c.cjsing af the system n~dbecome counter productive.
5.0514 we, therefore, fee; that an approach to this issue has to be restrictive .*a.!:i?et-than liberal. We ara t.i~ab1.s to accept suggestians for ar’dikions to the li5t an the basis of uncovered discipilner or analogous extensions. We also feei that the argument based or: a
certain  type  of  knowledge  cumir;g in  handy  in.  some 
aspects  of work in a particular service  is  misplaced, 
keeping  in  mind  that  under  the  present  scheme  a 

successful candidate may be allotsd to any of a number of services. Subjects which are generally useful to all
the services, such as Management, Public /Administration, etc. are already included in the list. Further, we are not in favour of adding a subject which in itself is a composite of branches of knowledge drawn from other disciplines. Also, if a subject is not taught in a large number of Universities at the first degree level, its claim for inclusinn will have to be ignored.
3.0515 Haling corieidered all these aspects, we Peel that there is a case far deleting the follcrwlng SLibJeCtS from the language and literature qraup:
1) French
.-\
z.1 German
?j Fiisss~an
4) Chinese
5.0516 We disc suggest that the foilowing s~tbje~ts !cay be added to the iiet of optional sub2ects fcir bcth the Frnlimrnary Exaaination and The Hain E:<.amlnation:
1) Education 2) Electronics and Telezcmmunlcatlon Engineerinq 2) Medical Science
f.QSi7 Me realize that In recsmmending the inciusion of Medical Science as an Optional subject. we are deviatinj from past practice. Candidat-rs having professional qualif-ications in Engineering, Agricirl ture, etc. have the advantage of choosing as an optiocal, a
subject which they have studied fcr their professional degree. We feel that the ME!diCa? cjraduates should be placed on the same footing.
3.03~ The total number c?f optiocel s~b~ectr,
far the Plain Examination will thus be .I&as against 47 at present, and fcr the Preliminary exminaticn it will be 25 inzi.ted of the present 22.
s.OSZl We have examined whether the above s~ibjsct.; can be characterised as scoring subjects. A study oi statistical distribution af m*.rk.s does not support tne
view that these are scoring subjects as compared to others. UPSC has a system of moderation . We feel that
this method is reasonable and is workin!: well.
5.0322 There is also the question whether the threshold of difficulty is the same in these subjects as in othsr subjects. While the examination system tries ta take care that it is uniform in all subjects, it ic not only the manner of setting the questions and evaluating but also the syllabus that plays a role in this. We have elsewhere made our recommendations for a detailed prescription of the s)rllabi of ail optional subjects. and their periodic revision .
5.06 NEGATIVE MARKING IN OBJECTIVE TYFE TESTS
5.0601 Wni,le reviewing the scheme of 9bJective type of test in the Preliminary E::aninat.ian, we found that tke UPSC Supplies Test Pockl~tsto the candidatas at the examination. The questions are contained in the Test socklets and the answer to each question is in multiple choice of four. A candidate ie required to shads the correct answer- with hard black lead pencil. in a separata answer sheet. The duration of the e::amination is two hours for each paper.
3.0602 We ttwnd that while anwering the Test Booklets, thmre is a possibility that a candidatr may have no knowledge of tha subject but would nakm a puer8 and shade the nost plausible answer in the multiple choica. As per existing practice it tho answer is cmrrect, he gets credit for it but for a wrong ansuer, there is no deduction a+ marks (i.~. negative marking!. 5incr the purpose of the Prelifiinarf Exarinrticn is to pick up the competent and serious-ninded candidates, it would be expedient if negatibe markicq Is introduced for srrong anrwera in the objective tree of questicnr in thq Preliminary Exaainaticn. This WC’iIQ qive an advPnLsg+
’10 the candiGate who has a thoreuqk knarledqo at Z~R wbject and wuld eiuninate car4rdaks, who have rrerei’i’. wpkvficial knowledge and want to %carsby more guese .mm-E. in cthvr wares, intr.Ji<lKt!.Za ni nsgstiva-maruznq far wrong answers woi$ld scr?.Ien aqt the less ier~sus candidatss. Howovwr, :F 5 cr-dic!ato lsaver a questim unanswered, it wouid be a17 evionzce khat he is an hancra-. iandrdate, nhc doer not clnlm to know tnc answer ano :here should be no negstise marking Tor this. Weiqhtage
negative marking for each item crf wrong an6wer i4OUld ss SO pmrcsnt of marks allotted to that qyestion.
3,0643 We, therefore, recommend that tor objective type nt test in the Prelminary €:amsation there should be nrqative marking tor the wrong answers and that tho weiqhtage for each item of wrong answer should be 50
percent of the marks allotted tor that question. Those who do not attempt an answer need not be penalised by negative marking.
5.07     INTRODUCTION OF LECTURES, GRCUP DISCUSSIONS, PSYCHOLOGICAL AND APTITUDE TESTS IN THE RECRUITMENT PROCEDURE
5.0701 We have been requested to examine the introduction of ‘Lectures’ , ‘ Grzup Discussion’ . Psychological and Aptitude Tests in the r-rcr-u:.tment procedure for the higher Civ; 1 Services.
5.0702 During out-visits, we a5ked leading experts on management and Sehavioural sciences regarding tho validit./ of Psycliological Tests’ .r ‘aptitude Tests’ etc.
as a part of the rccri-iitment proceditrs for the hxgher C.rvil. Services. We requested same ie,idrng n;t.nagrment specialists to e::amine the issue :n depth and give L~S their opinion. Xe also scnsulted some hiyh ranking government officers to get their reacticns about these tes.ting methods.
5.0703 We came across varying paints of view about the validity and utility of these tests, which-can be summarieed as follows:
(i)     Paychological and Aptitude tests are of recent origin. Far these tests to be administered with
sow measure .of success, precise job description mruld br necessary to dwiae appropriate Tests.
lii) Purely on the basis of Psycho:ogrcal and hptitude Tests, It would be inexpedient to rithmr rliminate candidates as lacking In attributes for the higher Civil Services or to giro them highQr marks using test scares as pcaitivs indicators ot some attributes. ‘Psychological Tosts nay give indications of rithmr strong corre1at:m or-we&. correlations of test XCCRS of candidates with some of their attributes. They are nr,t c~lic:u%.ve. Whereas aptitude Testi COli;:! be devised far special aptitude8 oucti 3% clerzcal, muslcaL and. rcchanisa4 aptrtudos P+F., they might ilot be usetul. frrr ttis higher. Z1-2: %:vices, where tnz incumberlts handle a vdr i+ty 5f jobs requir;?; diverse apt; tLdee. Fsychciogical Tests hsve to be contiiic;ousLy revisad and updatEd as rupetition o? tests would enablq cmdidates ta have prim knowledge and fake their remponucs. Psychological Te0ts are used by the Services Selection Boards (538) tor testinq candidates at the stage ot entry into officor”s rank in the firmed Forcrs. In 558, thesr are rdminimtarsd ta candidates who qualify in a written rxanination
conducted by the UPSC. Thereafter such qualified candidates go through (a) Psychological Tests *
(b) Group Tests and (c) Perscnal Interview with equal weightage given ta a11 the three components.
(vii) The Indian     Institutes of Management (IIMs) and the Indian Institute of’ Technology ( IITs) whicn are aware of the discussions on the subject of Fsychological and Aptitude Tests are not definite abnut their validity for practica.1 use nor dc they use them for the seiectiori of either the faciilty or the students.
(viii1Even     thovgh every effclrt would be made to make such tests cul ture-free, candidates with a rlrral background might feel la55 comfortable with such test procedures.
(ix)     Such tests canno% be an infallible guide to understaninq the entira gamut of attitudes c-f a group o.f individuals. In thf Sands of trained psycRoloqists. however, such tgsts nay yield iCme
* Psychological Tests consists of (a) Thematic Perception Test (A candidate is required to write a story on a given theme);* (b) Words Association test (About 20 words are flashed with a pro:ector with a time interval for each word. A candidate is required to write a sentence on each word); (c) Situation Reaction Test ( a photograph of a situation is flashed with a Frojecter and a candidate is required to write a paragraph on it); (d) self-Description (A candidate is required to write a5 to what he thinks of himself-and also how his parents and teachers sssess him). Answers of a candidate in the above Tests are assessed by trained Psychologists to determine his personal qualities to the extent possible.
useful information about the candidates but
complete accuracy of the information cannot be
ensured.

(x)     The crw of the problem is whether a given test can make systematic measurements of some poychological traits. In order to answer this important question, the Psychological Tests must have the following characteristics :
(a)  reliability 
(b)  validity 
(c)  standardization 
(d)  norms  for  proper  interpretation  cf  test 
scores 

3.0704 Moreover. Psychological Tests should also satisfy the criteriort of non-repetitiveness for use in a competitive exarnimatiim tcj ensure thst candidates would not be able to beat the system through coaching.
9.0705 In vierr of the precondrtians for- administering them and the lac)-crf universal validity of scores obtained through such tests, we are of the view thar Peychological Tests should not be a part of the se’lection procedure in the higher Civil Services.# If
#     “Because personality is so a1 1-lnclusivs a concept and because its manifestation is often =ample:< and covert, development and use of self-rating inventories and projective tests are as yet not on SO secure a foundation as tests of mental abilities,. ..“ “Theorv and Practice of Fsvcholosical Testina bv Frank S. Freeman.
6     4Je wmrr told DW a leading mapaqement exper-, of the country that human brirrce .-?reict mat enkrt;cs an: that almost all 0′ *,!s%m are ‘fii.:ed 0ncitia6 . Therefore, any neat Psyc!ic?aqie.rl ‘art wuuld be, found wanting for catrgorisotic.3 ct Derscno 3s either fit or unfit: fbr the higher Civil SCr’J,qces.
they could be used for coi~.nscliing St.
1.0707 Regarding :introduction of lectures, we do not inink that it should be nmcte a part of the seisction 11-ncess. Its introductior: wotnId not in any way enhance Lk Quality of seiect.i~mof iandidates for the higher
ivil Services, by t.estii;g attributes and skills iqhich wenot already been te.sts?d. Or, the ccntrary, it minht
ii,le d city-bred candidate with verbal 3b.:iIl a isproportionately lar3e 5c~re. If required, skill ~n eliver-iny lecturss as a pbrt sf pub1 ir speak:inc could P iapartrd d:iririg trainihp.
"Pencil-and-paper Tests rhaf measure some aspects of crsonality are now available. b!o<&ls amor?g those an? .hc? so-called temperraiaent or ?er,zonality in.dcntarit.e. :vse consist of a quas’iicn in which the applicant i.5 sked tci evaluate himself re:a?-ivs to certain aseects ot sychiatry and abnormal,Fsychciogy. Sucn tests are !~thject to a great deal of contrnversy, however, arid tiore is a school of experimental psychologirts hich condemns them mainly on two grounds. First, ndiv-iduals will not give honest answers in a oinpetitive teet that asks. them to describe their
..orma1 and intimate behaviuur or be1iefe. Second it
.
‘-1
..
3 maintained that the value of these tests lies in ieir use as therapeutic or clinical aids rather than as shicles for competition."
fiffner-Presthue in Pub?ic Rdministration
I’ ‘I
3.0709 In our vim, Group Discusmien can be usefully introduced as a part of the Interview Test as it would bring eut the capacity ot a candidate to interact with his peers. This quality is relevant for the highmr Cival Services a8 if! such servic~san offacer is not On?v a leaaer oP him own team of officials but he also has to interact eftactively with hi3 -err rn other limbs of rZmi?ristration. Group discuesaon wcbld rlsc enrblr the Intor-viow Board to have a curck percsptior: of the strength md weaknesses of a candrdate oarticularly reqaraing a crndreatrs atanlit/ tc snai./so. !isten. percrri+do cztc. and ir. can diract its a:tentzcr tc rucn areas fcr r\ more detailed pmbe uurinq the rna:vieual lnLar..*le.nc,. be. therefore. -*V–,~,m:x?n~i chat Grouo OASCUSSL~ ca zr*::.-.=duc:?d 3s on :rIXRqrai camFcnent ct t?* iCiG?’::ew Test. 15e interview r=st WOU?G ~XQCte a twc 5tAp process, wit3 GI-~u~~13cusr:mi amnq candsdstos prrceeing the rr.d:rrdua’ intervirw. In ot5er wtrds, all candidates who aro ts appear oe?ors an Intarview Porrd during the day may GIZ ca?:ea zn the RcrerrourV fir a Wcup Discussion of abor!r an hour durinq wkkh t%? Members of the Intrrview Beard woulu be present. Immediately atter the Group Discussion. the zandzdrtcs wculo be called inbividually for the rnt+rriow. As nearly as pcssible each candidate should be interviewed for at least half an hour SO that the
Interview Board could have sufficient time fcr a natural, thorough and purposeful assessment of his potential for the higher Civil Services.
3.0710 We feel that with the present number o-t 1600 tiz 1605, candidates who are interviewed by dif irrent Interview Boards every year, it lnay be difficult to find the additional time for Gr~upDiscussion. But if the number of candidate5 fcdf these Intorview Test COUia be 1-ediiced by the delinking .of –G*-!=tio ‘b’ Services and Scme of the Group ‘!A’ Servit:es which ltre have recommended clsewhere in the Reporkc, Group !:iscussicn rould 59 introduced a% an adjunc,t ~CJthe individual interview AithOtit causing any ~t~tll!3 c:’/Clc.
to the .t5.t?~? No marks need however be separately allotted for Group Uisci!ssim;–the assessfient wil-1 be bared on a ransideration of the get-fcrwiti?icE- <n the Group Discussion wrl the Interview Test taken together.
3.00 INTERVXEk TEST
4.OEOl ‘in almost all major-countries of the world, Interview Test is an integra part of the pracess of seiection to the higher Civil Service. In our country, Interview Test has been a part of the competitive outfit tor selection to the higher Civil Services righr since Independence and even for recruitment to the I.C.S. during the British rule t.
3.0802 Initially, in the IAS etc. Examination, the Interview Test had a relatively higher weightage in the ochmme of Competitive Examination. Between 1947-57, the Interview Test for all Services had also a minimum qualifying mark of 33 percent. When the Kothori Committee undertook the review of the Civil Services Examinatron (1974-76) they noted that the relative weightage of the Interview Test was 17.1 % for the IAS,
21.6 % for the IFS, 16 X for the Cectral Services and 19 X for the IPS #.
Initially Interview Test (Viva-Voce) was not an integral part of even rhe ICS Examination. It was introduced as late as 1917 for the Home Civrl Service and the ICS ctc. on the recommendation of an Expert Committee.
"The prcblem of selection for character is still the pons asinorurn of recruitment to the public Services everywhere. The British Civil Service experiments with the Interview". -Herman Finer in
‘The Theorv end Practice of Modern Government.’
I IFS 400 out of 1850 marks ICIS 300 out of 1790 marks (From 1951 to 1964. for the
IA5 also, it was 400 out of 1850 Services -290 out of 1230 marks  marks).  Central 
IPS 209 out of  1050 marks. 
from 1947 to 1951, Central Services &  irk1 IPS  eervicms, had 300  vaz. marks  ICIS/IFS. for the 
Interview Test. 

-103-
0805 In thm ochamm of a Camnon Examination introduced
011 1979, the Interview Testhas a maxinun of 290 ;rkm and its weightage is only 12.2 per:ent (25C marks .t of 2050 marks).
hour, which can be altered at the discretion of
the Board $.
(iv) Each Interview Board is headed by a Member of
the UPSC and is assisted by four
Experts/Adviscrs, who are eminent persons with
diverse backgrounds, i.e such a8 retired civil
servants, distinguished academics, scientists
and others.
At the beginning of the Interview Test, Advisers
are briefsd by the Chair-mart and the Members of
the UPSC, regarding the purpose of .the
Interview Test and .the manner of conducting the
same and the common standards that the Boards
must follow to maintain uniformity of assessment
X     Even For the ICS Examination the duration of the Interview wa5 onlv 15 minutes (Civil Service Comtniesj.on’s pamphlet of the competition held in India
1.n u7anctarv, 1926, fur the ICS).
In 1726 for the ICS Examination Viva–Yoco Test i1.e. Interview Test) carried 200 marks in a scheme of examination where written papers-both compulsory and optiuna1 -carried 1500 marks. By 1935, viva-voce test for: the ICS had 300 marks when written papers-both rompuls&y and optianal .-carried the same 15GO mark:s. ‘The purpose of viva-voce Test for the ICS E;ramina.tion in 1935 could be best understood from the following extract of the Civil Service Commission’s Pamphlet:
"V1va-woce -the examination will be in marters Of general interest: it is intended to test the candidate’s alertness, inteliigence and intellectual outlook. The candidate will be accorded an opportunity of furnishing the record of his life and education"
(vi) The Interview Test ie not primarily used for a test of knowledge in the optional subjects am the lame has already been tested in a suftrciently rlsorous written test at tho Main Examination. Soma cadidates are, hourever, asked qurstimr on their academic study wikh a view to arrser5i-q theit-general quaiit:mi .xx! abilities. Hoetly c:ae:itiocr in the Intervzew Test are ~risvrnte d.ict. we haopening An the ccructrv as wvll as in t.ha internatioriai field. and also on the :ecdwr cur-ents of thcught and ner dlscovsrias in xiwics and tectmolugy stc. fitiest:-rns arc ~ib-pet. :2.i :ke aociai, G-x..~.s%~c. pc\xtrcsl and hiatorics; isciies ta .Aix!rr.stard rho i-:ai-dida!.:s’s range E+ interest. L‘rgJi:rt+a are af+m %:r.pl~?:L..s:;tions of, 4.i=,:..~!: crsc:m solvirq ndture :.z assess their hbiE attit.;iile?e arid juesemer.:, dud Cb-ir suirabzlity tcr tk hiqiicr Civil 5eruicrs.
!*xii I CIavirers arz pzt.c.;sd amcng differcnr Inte:-,.:2+ Boards a1!nost %wry ucvk.. !.~~ii: af are jiud~~ t,-s
Sons the qualitirs that ::I 1nte.rview Test are mzntal alertness, clcar ass logical exposition. balance o+ judgement,
varisty and depth Of interest, abiiir; ?zr
social cohesicn, intebqrity of views arid leadership qualitias.
(1::)     Candidates who have taken the Rain Examination in my one of tfra Indian Languages can uo. the same language medium before the Interview Board. When candidates arc Ir?ter-virwd in an Indian langcaqe of their choice, the Boards ara assisted by oxperts W!;G ari proqicient in that particular language. The mrks -=cord t.y tFe eandidatei ak +R kritten Fast ir t52 ?%~nE:.aminatio~ are ::o% known tc t%e ;nter.:.:w. Roiird. Tha DcarGs orly get 3 short stimmz.,-~-oi ?Iir candidate’ P bra-Ju::~, kokc~ssantf intsre.s;s. Th~sthe Eoerdo ir= not iniI~!e!w:s:~ir. %fie:-!-assassmere by rr;~ nark% secyr’ed ;Is. tne f:.)ndiuirte?s ?E the dLL,fen tnst.
got into the first lOCt positions in the Pteri.t List invariably got high marks both in the witten test anr! the Interview Test indicating 3 high positive c3rvei .ition.
The performance cf tbe bright candidates from amonq the members a+ the Schedu?ed Castes and the Srhedc,?ed Tribes Rave baen at par c*c;th tfic perCorr?mco of the Gsn.zra! irand;ja+c,s in the lnter .,srlw Te,jt
Y The Supreme Cattr-t i7avo observed in Lila Dhar .~e-;t.,s-State of Kajastnan (?.[R, 1-981,SC, 1777) that:
"The  writtsn  e:.amination  a~ie55~5ttie  man 5  Ants1 :e~t 
and  the i.tnerviaw  tests  the man  himsel+ and  the  ti-ai:? 
shall  meet  for  1 proper selection." 

Te6.t. Thus the Interview test ha8 been able to identlty the high flier.
t In a recarrt judgement, the Suprema Car;rt have uptteld t!w validity of a minimum qurlifyrnq :nark +or the Interview Test (Mehmoc;d Airrn fariq versus State a9 Rafasthm, RIP 1908, SC. l451l.
recruitment of higher Civli Servants in diftrrmt countries regarding the the relative weightage tor the
Intrrvlew Teet.
3.0811 rhera hrvP boen SQ~F.Y rmcmnt judicial pronouncPmentr that a dioprsporticnrtrly high weightage tcr the LntsrvFaw Test for =he Civil Services E:enmtnatfor? may attrdct the …’:~e ct arzitrariness and is
5..0812 The Kothari Committee had recommended a lower weiyhtage far the interview Test i.e., 300 out of 3CWO (10%) because it had Trovided for a Stage 111 in the selection process i.e., a Post-training Test after a Foundation Course af one year tor allotment to rdifferent Services. It is s~gnificantto note that even the Kothari Committee had recommended a total of 500 marks (16.7%) for-thz 1nt.ervim-J Test cut c-f a total of 3OC;O marks recommended .by then for the Civil Services Examination until the LBS Natiunel Academy of Administration wa3 ~ju;tab1y strengthened for the introduction of Stage 111 o+ the selection procsss. Thus the ;:;othaP.i Sorniniirtx~wet-? iiot agGirtet a highe-
wightage for the 1nter.v iecr lest.Y
3.081s The b’othar-i Committee had noted that in the 165 etc. E::aminat>.cn,tk,e percentac;e of marks sec!.ired .in tha Personality Test (i.e., Interview Test) was resconsrbie for the SUCKOS~~ of one-faurth 07 tne candidatec+. io the P?er-;.t List. They did not ccnciider this as a desirable featl:re of the selection process and recommended tg reduce the relative weightage of the Interview Test. Government, hwever, did not completely agree with the katha’ri Ccminittee’s recommendation in tRi.s reyar.d and fixed the relative weightago of the
__-
* Government, howevcr, flxed tho weightage of the Interview Test at 12.2 percent while fmpfemcnting the recommendation of tfte Kothari. Committee.
Interview Test at 12.2 percent. Qut in the post-Kothari system also, marks scored by the candidates in the
Interview Test has played an equal-ly important roli.. Our analyses have shown that about me-fourth of the candidates in the Merit List in the post-Kothari system of Csmmon Examination owe their succass to the marks secured by them in tne Interview Test. Thus compared t3 the ,ors-!.~~l:.h~.risystsn, redc:cti=ri ii: rs?at;ve weightage 3f the Ir:f+rvizw Test in the pc)s.t–i. sthat-i svstscr has not ,nade any diffeiencz in the ‘iut~ess r3tii3 of <ar:aidotes 13-the Mzr-it List I
recruitment. F\t this stage, when time has not come to bke im final view on the post 1979 entrants, it might be prematura to alter the relabive weightage for the Interview Test in the scheme of selection.
5.0823 Elsewher-e in this Report, we have recommended the introduction of Group Discussion as an adjunct to the Interview Test. This will no doubt mean that the time alloted for completion of the process of Group Discussion and the Interview Test will have to be increased.Elsewhere, we have recommended reduction -in the number of Services to which recruitment is mads through the Civil Services Examination. If this rccGmmendatiori is accepted, it. shoiilcl be pcsriible to complete the selection process without exceeding the present time frame.
5.0816 Taking an over-all view of the matter, at this stage, we do not recommend any significant alteration in the relative weightaqe of the Interview Test in the e::istinq scheme OT the Civil Services Examination.
3.0827 In some other part of this Report. we have recommended the introduction. of a conpylectry Essay Paper (200 marks) in the Main Examination. If this re-commendation i5 accepted, the total marks in the competitive written test of the Main Examination will go upto 2000 instead of 1800ips at present. In order to
keep the weightage of the Interview Test at the same level as in the present scheme, the -totalmarks of such Test may be increased to 360 from 250. The weiqhatge of the Interview Test will thus become 15.04 percent (300 out of 3300 marks), as against the present weightage of
12.2 percent(250 Gut of 2050 marks) ;a marginal increase.
5.09 AGE LIMIT
5.0901 The Kothari Committee had recommended an age range oi 2?-26W years for the Civil Services Examination. While implementirlg the recommendations. Government increased the uiipsr age limit to 20 years. keeping the lower age Limit of 21 years unaltered. The above age limit of 21-28 years wag in operation from 1979 to 1787, when Gover-nment re-considered the matter and reduced the upper age limit to ZS years.
3.0902 Age limit for the Civil Services Examination (where a Bachelor’s degree of an Indian University LS the minimum qualificatign) ha5 to take into account the average age of students acquiring the Bachelor’s degree.
The Administrative Reforms Commission (1972)had also recommended a higher age limit of 26 years.
In India. an averace student passes the Senior Secondary Exavinrtion (10+2)at the age of 10. Thereafter, he has fo spend three years in a College/tJmiversity to get a degree in humanities, commerce or science. Thus by the time he becomes a graduate, he is about 21 years of age. 6 professional such as a doctor or an engineer has t5 take a longer period of four to five years after the Senior Secondary level. Thus when he completes the Rachelor’s degree, he is 22-23 years of age. Taking into account the age prcYilo of our graduates, in our-view,thc lower age limit has been rightly fixed at 21
years.
5.0903 There is, however, snme diffssrence of opinion about the maximum age limit. It has been argued that beyond a particular age, it is difficult to mocrid candidates through rraining. Therefore, in 1987, Government decided to reduce the I-lpper age limit to 26 years as mentioned earlier.
5.0904 To assess the performance of the candidates in different age grcups, ~uemade an anzlysis of successful candidates (fables 13 to 20). The age distribution of successful general candidates in the Merit List 04 the Civil Service Examination during the years 1984-86 (when the upper age limit was still 28 years) reveals as f01lows: ti) Between 90% to 95% of candidates were recruited
betwren 21-2C years-
(ii) About 59% of candidates were recruited between
24-24 years.
(iii) Bulk of the candidatss with a rural backgrsund were recruited between 23-26 years.
5.0905 The above statistics clearly indicates that even during the period when the higher age limit wa5 28 years, the majority of successful candidates were between 21-26 years of age.
5.0906 The Kothari Committee had recommended trie age limits of 21-26 years to provide cpportunities for candidates, who are late blossomers and who wish to obtain either specialisation in a subject, or pure,cie higher academic studies. The upper age limit of 26 years also ensures that late blossemers as well as candidates pursuing special iaed statlies can get adequats number of attempts at the Civil Servicss Examination.
5.0907 It i’i of advmtagc for tile Civil Services to recruit persons who have continued their educatirn beyond the first decree level. SUch candidatss are likely to be in the age group uf 23 years and above. The age limit of 21 -26 years will thus provide adequa+a opportunities for such candidates and late blosscmers to compete in the Civil Services Examination.
5.0909 We recommend no change in the existing age limit of 21-26 years tor the general candidates. There would be the usual relaxation of 5 years of age for
members of the Schedc:Ied Ca8tar and the Schrdulrd Tribes.
5.10     MeER OF CITTEMPTS TO BE PERMITTED TO ELIGIBLE CCINDIDhTES
5.1001 The Kothari- Committee had recommended only two attempts for the Civil Services Examination for not only the general candidates but also candidates belonging to the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes. They had noted that the number of vacancies every year for the higher Civil Service being a fixed number, an increase in number of attempts would adversely attect the quality of the selected candidates. Government, however, did not agree with this recommendation of the Kothari Committee and permitted three attempts to ttte general candidates but did not impose any restriction on the number of attempts for the candidates belonging to the Scheduled
Castes and the Scheduled Tribes.
3.1002 To appreciate the correlation betweeR the number of attempts pnd thr success ratio. we analysed the percentage of general candidates, who come in the Herit Li6t fn their first f second / third attempts (Table-21) during the peri-1983-87 and noticed thm
following featuresr
Number of Attempts Percentage of successful candidates in the Merit List
First attempt  22% to 29% 
Second attempt  36% to 42% 
Third attempts  51% to 41% 

5.1003 The percentage of ger.eral candidates, who during the period 1984-87 come in the first 200 ranks in the Merit List (Table-22) and’ their success ratio. attempt-wise. ig as follows:
Number of attempts     Fercentage of success of candidates in* the first Z(:tO ranks in the Merit List
Fir5t attempt     20% to 31%
Second attempt     39% to 45%
Third attempts     25% tQ34%
5.1004 Thus we find that the siuccess ratio in the first attempt is low cornpaced to the success ratio in the second and third attempts. The success ratio in the second attempt is the highest; but it is only marginally
higher than the success ratio in the third attempt X. In other words, in the third attempt, a sufficiently high number of general candidates not only get into the Merit List but also into the first 200 positiens.
5.1005 fin opinion was expT2Ssed that as bright candidates should be able to make it into the Merit List of the Civil Services Exaninatiin with a maximum of two attempts, the number of attempts for the gerierai candidates should be limited to trvo as recommended by the Kcthari Committee. It was also argued that a large number of at.tempt.s gives a cwndidate with average abilities, scope tu perfect t3e tach?-ique af the competitive examination ar!d come into the Merit List. We have given careful thought to the above arguments; but we feal that the present scheme ,=f ?ires attempts f=r the general candidates need not be altered at this stage particularly when a good number of general candidate8 frtm the rural are.ae are coming into the Merit List.
5. i006 The Kotbari Committee’s recommendaticn regarding limiting the number of attempts to twc has intended mainly to discourage candidates attempting to
No analysis could be made regarding success ratio and number of attempts by candidates belonging to the Scheduled Cartes and the Scheduled Tribes because of insufficiency of data. Since there was no restriction
on their number of attempts, while application form. some of them did n falling ot fill  up up  the the 
column about the number of attempts. 

improve their position in the Merit List in the subsequent Examinations even after they have j.oined a Service. This has alrehdy been taken care of by the restrictions imposad by the Government recently in the Civil Services Examination rules, which lay dawn that if a candidate has been appointed to a Group ‘6%’ Service, other than the IAS and IFS, he can avail of only one more attempt at the subsequent Examination and that too on the condition that he seeks exempticn from the training with his batch, and loses his seniority. We have a150 not found any hard eviderice to indicate that mastery of the technique of the Civil Services Examination has played an important role in the sc~ccess of candidates taking their later attempts. Right from the introduction of the competitive e!.:amination for recruitment. to the IGS etc. Services,three attempts have been available to the candidates. Taking an overall view of the matter Me feel that there need be no alteration in the number of attempts aviji?ab:e to candidates.
5.1007 We have already mentioned that as per the scheme of Examination, eligible candidates belonging to the Scheduled Castes/Schedulsd Tribes have no limit an the number of attempts. In practice, they get as many as eleven attempts because of age relaxation of five years. But whereas there 16 a limit of three attempts for the general candidates, it does not seem fair that candi-dates belonging to the Scheduled Castes/Schetiulod
Tribes should get as many as eleven attempts. We, therefore, propose that whereas for the general candidates the number of attempts co~ild continue to be three, for those belonging to the Scneduled CasteslScheduled Tribes. the same be limited to double the number of attempts i.e., six attempts. This would not adversely affect the chances of the members of the Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes being recruited to the higher Civil Servlces as they have reservation of vacancies.
5. iooe We therefore, recoinmend that for the grnwal candidates tha permissible numner of attcmpts for the Civil Serv.iL(:ec_&::amination should ccntioue to be thrae. For the members of the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes, thesis should be limited to six
5.1009 We ai-e t’appy to note that e number of cmdidstcs telorqinq to the Sckeduled Csstes s:zd the c_ are hzgh up in the Merit !-is!:. We
~~heduiedTribes
rclcommend. t,hat such Icandidates should be treated a5 ’general’ carididdtes and should n?t be set off 2.yainst the reserved quota provided they arc within the age limit of 26 years and have not availed of more than three chances ( as in the case of general candiUates 1.
3.11 ALLOTMENT OF SERVICES MTER THE FOUNDATION COURSE
3-1101 The Kothari Committee had recommended that the scheme of the common examination should be in three stages, viz., the Preliminary Examination (Stage I) , the Main Examination and Interview Test (Stage 11) and a Foundation Course of about a year for all selected candidites and allotment of Service after a post-Traininq Test (Stage 111). As per staqe 111 of the scheme s~\CieS~f~l the Main Examination and
candidates at Interview Test were not to be straightway allotted to dif,fercnL Servicss on the basis of their merit and
grefereiice.  Instead,  thev  were fir5t tc be sent to the 
LPS National  Academy of  Rdministra tion.  The Foundation 
Course  was  to include not only academic work but  also 

field training in a rural area for 6i:: or eight weeks. At the end of the Foundation Course, trainees wera t.o be interviewed by a Board constituted by the UPSC. The Board was to assess the candidates with regard to their suitability for *:arioua services based on their training record as prepared by the Acaoemy. ?he final merit list was to be determined by the total mark.s cbtained at the Main Examination and the Interview Test and the Post-Training Test at the end of the Foundation Course. Allocation of services was to be on the basis of such a Merit List and the preferences of the candidates . For the Kothari Committee, the rationale of Stage I11 was to provide for a period ot extended contact ot competent trainers with the candidates. Such a contact was meant to enable trainers to observe closely and assess the interests, attributes and personal qualities. etc. of the candidates as revealed through their performance in training during the Foundation Course.
3.1102 Our observations on the Stage 1×1 are as follows:
(i)     The different Services ccmpris ng the higher Civil Services do not have equal service prospects. Therefore, ailcrat on cf csrvicz is a crucial deter-mina;-,t ci a c:and.idates fi.d.ture career ir. Government. Such a crucial matter couid be hest decided by a ncar-anonymous competitive test 1ike the Main Examination and the Interview Test. Any further rEfinenient of the system for aliocatlon
3: service aftor d Po%t-Training Test woald nct snly lose its anonymo:.:s character bur also would tnnrl to ICSQ credibiiity ?.rid hcnci? universa? acceptability.
(ii)     All categories of the higher Civil %:vice require some basic quatities of mind and leadership. Officers, possessing those qualities are also expected to pertorm betrer An functional areas with training and on-the-job
experience. Often afficersdeveAop a flair for
a particular type of work only after a few years in service. In such a situation, in a Foundstion Course of one year-which is at the beginning of an officer’s career -it would be difficult to identify correctly and assess properly the specific attributes tar allotment to a service.
(iii)     filiotment of Service at the end of the Founda t.ion Course uf one year’s auration may not be fair to the candidates 3150. A successful candidate must know the Service to ahich he is assigned so as to mak;e up his mind Mhettier to join at ell at-ti; compete agai;: to improve his prospects.
(iv)     Even thouqh a Fqilndation Course is usefcti, such a course shbuld be organised after aliocating the services to the candidates on the basis of their position in the Merit List and preferences expressed by them .At present, there is a Foundation Course of 18 weeks for the candidates appointed to different services. A Foundation Course of such a non-competitive character is desirable. It promotes rrpirit da corps among the members of different services. The recommendation 07 the Kothari Committee for allotment of service after a Foundation Course and Post-Training Test would bristle with serious practical difficulties as explained by us.
5.1103 Service allocation after the foundation course might lead to criticism of favouritism and of lack of fair assessment of the trainees and their allocation of service on the basis o such assessment. The net result will be that merit rat ng on the basis of near-anonymity of calididates woi~ld be lost without there being any corresponding benefit.
3.1104 Government. did not accept the recommmdation of the Kathari Committee regarding al€ntment af Service after a Post-Trainirq Test (Staqe 1111. in our viaw, the present prilctice regarding dllocation of Servicss should continue.
3.1105 The Kothar-i Committee had recommednded strengthening of the La1 Bahadcr Shastri National Academy of edministration at-hssoorie and making it a high level professional institution. During our visit to the Academy, we got the impression that a number of ccncrete steps have been taken in this regard, in the recent past; but a lot more remains to ha dnne, in the areas of faculty development and inf ra-strcctural facilities.
5.1106 elthough we focussed our attention mainly on the srlection procedure, we are aware thkt the process
of selection, training and careor management are
integrally related. We are of the opinion that the Academy should not only run the Foundation course for all Services and the professional course for the ICIS; it should also impart high level in-service training to the administrators at different stages in their career, Research on developmental, mguiatory and social aspects of administration should be a regular activity at the Qcademy.In this conte::t we were happy to note that attempts were baing nade to strengthen the library including the reprographic and case-study units. We recommenri that tho syllabi and traLning curricuium of
the Academy should be repularly updated. We alsr. recomffiend that comparative devalopmenta: studies shoulc: be undertaken at this Academy so that the administr-atoTs
develop  an  international  perspective,  based  upon  the 
e:.:pi?riencE?  of  both  the  dwdt?lO7i.ng  and the  developed 
countries. 

3.1107 In addition to the S.V.F National Police Academy for the IPS, there are traininq instituticns for most of the Central Srr*/ices. The functioning af all these insti.tctions will have to be studied in depth ana adequate infrastructure facilities and proper Stclffing with inter-disciplinary faculty ensc!reci. This would ensure greater professicnalisation of the Civil Services, and enrich all these institutions by an orqanised programme of exchange of knowledgo and information.
CHAPTER-&
QENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS

-127-

6.01 TIME CYCLE OF CIVIL SERVICES EXAMINCITION
6.0101 At present, the time cycle of the Civil Servicss Examination is such that it takes almost a year ,frcm the date of the Preliminary Examination to the announcement of the final- results.
6.0102 We heard the criticism that the present time cycle, spread over-a period 07 a year. is rather too long and snould be compPessed. 1Je were alsu told that the pr-esent time cycle keeps the candidates waiting for a ‘full year to know the outcome of their efforts. and that 5~1ct.lii long period IS likely to interfere with the proper career pirnninq oP n:any young people in the formative years of their lives.
6.0103 l4e have noted that the time cycle Colild be redused if Scth the Preliminary and .the Main Examination are of i-he objective type. gut such a scheme of a totally objective type of ezaminaticn wci-ild not be able to test various qualities of mir-d slnch as analyticai ability. capacity fcr critical t-sasoning, ca~acityfor synthesis of ideas and thouqhts and 1inSuistic and presentational skills.* In a separate chapter of our Report, we have endorsed the usefulness of the current
8     Herman Finer in his The Tbecr-v snd Practice 04 Modern Government is of the view that competitive examinations should,& adopted to the chief forms Of
general education qeneral education  because it is over a period  only that  through such the mind is 
trained pr.operly. 

scheme o? the Cr;.il Services Examinaticn consisting ot a Preliminary Examination of the objective type followed by the Main Examinaticn of the conventional essay type of written test, and finally the Interview Tast.
h 0104 On scrutiny of the various stages a4 the existing time cycle for the Civil Servic~s Examination. we found that at present, a candidate in required to fill up an application form to appear at the Preliminary Exarnication. The above form is publishad as a part cf the notification issued by the UPSC ed=ry year icr ths
C.ivil Services Examination. Since thi-, apolicaticn form contains anly some basic information regardirig the candiriates! those candidates whco are zc!ccessfu! ,xthe Preliminary Examinaticn snd are eligible tc appear in the Hain E:.:arninatic–n are ~sst-ied 4 ‘n*w applicatian form ty the UF’SC in Pugc.st rver’j *fear. The successf~il candidates at the Prsliminarr Examination are required to fill up the above app!icdt.isn forms and send them to the LlPSC before they at-.= issusd Admit Cards for tL.e Main
Examination.  We  arc 01 the view that the filiirig up 0:’ 
application  farms  by  the candidates  before  the  Main 
Examination  can  be dispensed with if  the  application 

farms for the Prel isinary Examination cantain SC!W extra caiumns to have a11 the relevant information about them. In other words, immediately after the results of the Preliminary Examination are announced by the UPSC at the end of July.. the UPSC can send provisional Admit Cards
to candidates qualiTied for the Main Esamination in the month of August.If the above procedure is followed,, the UPSC might gain about four weeks time., and start the Main Examination in the first week of October instead of the tir.;t week of November: as at present. If the Main Exmination starts in the first week of Oct’cber. it would be possible to announce the results of the written
test  of  ri:e  Maif1  Exaninatisn by  the  third  *ri>ei:: uf 
Fett-xar.:;  insitead  of  the third  reek  of  March  as  at 
preseni:.  ihus  the  Interview  Test which  at  ?,resent. 

begins in the third week a+ clpril could be advaricsa b%# about foitr weeks and begin by the third week of Parch. ‘I-f the .?.Suvai-%scheduling is done, ineL?ad of ;;ettrng abui:t 51:; ;40ei::s for the Interview Test,, i.s., from the third week of April to the end of May, t.hs GPSC ram qet t2rl weeks tor the intzrview rest. Sue$ a?. tzndecr period for the Interview Test would enable ths UPSC tc Lntroduco G-oL~~Dicccssion 35 a oart of suck! a-test, k :onger time geriad ui tm lrevCs fzi-the In?;srvie; Tezt would also enable the UPS3 to constit::te lesser xtmber uf i!itsrview Boards, if necassar-y, and interview lezser number af candidates per day by each Board. In other wards, compress;un of the time cycle by four weeks would permit greater flexibility to the UFSC in conductrng the Interview Test., which is ;iC.ely to improve the quality of se1ection.
6.0105 We, therefore, feel that whereas suffici@nt
time is required to conduct the Civil Sorvices Examination, the present time cycle of nearly one year could be compressed by about four weeks to provide for a period of ten weeks for the Interview Test, which i-s
likely to improve the q’-tality of select on.
6.02 GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF CANDIDATES
6.0201 As pointed out earlier in our Report, it is important that the members of the All India and Central Civil Services ace drawn from all aver the country. While Government shculd be able to pick out the best talent in the country irrespective of tneir regional background, the need for a balanced representation in the services in our federal polity cannot be ignored.
6.0202 Tables Z’L: and 24 indicate the number of candidates appearing at the different e::amination centres at both the Preliminary and the Main Examinations. the number who qualified at aacn stage and the Uiniversitiee which have provided the top ranKers in recent years. Making the simplistic assumption that the candidates appearing at a centre (other than Delhi) are drawn from the State in which it is located, it is seen that the number of candidates competing from ditferent States has no direct relatiMShip with their size and population. In some States, there is a declinin’g trend in the number of candidates. Even though the SUCC’ESS ratio of the candidates appearin= from different centres, viewed over a period of years is fairly even, it is apparent that in certain parts of
India,  a  sctf f icient  number  of  candidates,  though 
eligible,  are  not  competing  in  the  Civil  Services 
Exemination. 

6.0203 During oiir visits fs the different States, we made it a point to ascertain the reasons~tor this kind
0.F imbal..mca, which wcula not be healthy in tRs lonq run. We firir: that severai factor-ri nave Ied tc th9 present 5;.tu~!li;n. I? many parts 0.t Incia. medical, engineeriqg and management CCJLI~SIS cre;?a of -f the best ta15nt. A7:trac tive ernp1oymoct cjpportv!iities i.? executive -3rd manager;al pcsts in public and irivat3 industry banking aiid ccmmarcial institutlsn3, are ajaiiabla in :A farget-prcporcian i!:the rziativrly advanced Stakes. Interastlcgly, it wr:u?J appear thet there are Jiffer-entials wen in the status and prezrige enjoyed by ci-ri1 servants ira different parts cf th? coi~ntry. Apart #-om these factors. awaranesi of the Civil Serstices Exaimnation system and the carser opportunities av;ri:a.bIc through it has not perco!ated uniformly all over India.
6.0204 During our visits to the States. a critical reference was made to the fact that Delhi accounts for a
disproportionately high proportion of candidates taking
the  Civil  Services Examination,  as hell as  of  those 
figuring in the merit list.  Implicit in the  statement 
is  d  feeling  that  the  Delhi  candidates  have  an 

undeserved advantage. We do not find any substance for such an apprehension. First, we would do well to remember .that the institutions of higher learning in Delhi attract candiaetes from all over fndia, themselves selected on merit. Secondly, Delhi being the seat of the naticrna! government., it is understandable that the younger generatico in and around Delhi develop familiarity from an early stage with the selection procedures and the career oppartmi ties available in the Civil Services. Thirdly, library and othar facilities
are readily avaiiable in Delhi.

6.0203 What the Committee would like to emphasize is that in order to even out the regional representation, effort should be to replicate to the extent pu5sible. the above mentioned favourable factors in other cities and larger towns. Our earlier recommendatiun to increase the number of examination centres is a step in thi5 directiai. In a subsequent section, we have elaborated the measures needed to give wider publicity to the scheme of the Civil Services Examination and to spread greater awareness among the potential candidates. There is another avenue of action which we would commend-There is obuiausly na part of
India where talented candidates are not available. It
is possible,  however,  that they are  handicapped  in  terms 
of  lack  of  proper  coaching,  guidance,  reference 
materials  etc.  We  feel  that the  State  Governments 

concerned shouid, with the active support and involvement of the Universities, establish coaching centres in the cities and large towns which wculd pick nut potrntr?l candidates and giva them ttut extra push .torward, Gk:.ch wi11 ~ncuicatxin them carfidence to ti+i:,~ par-% in the all-Iridia ccmpetition arid to win posit~ons commensur:lte with their merit. Deserving idtncic:5tes ~VCLII~ be extznded s’:?;pendidry
also nerd ko .-_.uppSr<. ~Jc tilere coaciIiily
., doubt, ar 9 tic.. lities already. availcible fsr SC,‘ST candidates estaclisiied bu the Mlni5tr.y cf Weifar-o or ty thc Skate %.ov,?rnnhcntn. Ir, SLtt-vizkd. dii offor-t af 5 simiiar nature? ahcuid be made tr) cover candj.datr=s drawn from all sectit~cs of the ,:ornmtinity in those Stakes whiz!> are cut ca;tributibvq tt8;.ir-due ehc-irc to the CLVil Ser-vices.
6.0206 Gut-iny ?;= the GI:? were
oiur %~ieit-r Statas, disturbed to F:ear ah occasicna! .comment that.canciidstes tai;inq the eaamination in the Hindi medium seem tc Rave an edge over the others. As seen from Table-25 ,the number-of candidates taking the Main Examination ir: Yindi is oniy about 15 percent of the total number and, what is more significant, their success ratio is much lower than the overall -everage. Thus, this criticism is
totally unfounded. We are convinced that the Examination scheme 18 sound and fair and tb.t the medium of the e<amination has net introduced any bras in terms of chances of sccces~in the e::amrnation.
6 0207 We understand that the U.G.C. has a1read.y instituted a scheme at selected Universities/Col?.~ges for Frovidirig csachinrj classes etc. to pet-sons %elonSiny
to minor-ity czrrlmuni tics to enatle them tc compete in varioac, cnmpetit~.~~e:;aminations, ii7c!vding the c~rnoiaed Ci./1.1 Services Examinaticn. The c1.5.C. may re\/i=?w the scheme froa time to rime to Lmprc.+.e ics efticacv.
6.0301 We ha4.e air2acf.f referred tc the increa.=ingi, large ni.tg?b;I.t of candidat~s who have been appearinq a? the Pre1im:nar-y E;:aminaticn. To enabie lerge ;;i~a’bsr-cf candidates ~hc.are spr~adcL,c in different parts af tbe coccntri. to take the 4Civil Services Examination. ti-e UFSC has opened 7.0 Centre-, for such examinatisn. We ha\/e n-oted t.hat all tar: State capitals ha-/e been c~ntres fsr Frelirninary Examination. In some States, which are larger in size and population. there-are centres outside the State Capital also. For the 1988 Preliminary
Examination, there were 30 Centres.
6 0302 The Preliminary Examination is usually held on the second Sunday of June and the venue of the examination are Government schools and colleges. For the Deihi Centre, the UPSC conducts the Preliminary Examination directly but for the Preliminary Examination, which is conducted at the State Capitals etc, the UPSC requests the State Governments to nominate senior o.fficers of the rank of Commissioners to coordinate various activities relating to the Examination.
6.0303 In ortiar to popularice the Civil Services Examination in small towns and rur&l areas of the country which are away frm the St3.b Capitals and big cities, we .recornmend t5at tho nurr;ber cf centres Tor the Frel itninary Examination be increaeed substantially in consultation with the State Governments and Lrriim
iorritorios.
6.0304 We note that tho Staff Selectzcn Commissiin (BSC) which recruits mostly Group C officers, such as Clerks. Stenographers, Inspector-% of Customs and Income Tax. Auditors and Sub-Inspectors Of Foliee for Eelhi Police and CRI etc., has as many as 136 examination centres in different parts of the country as on 3ist of March, 1988. It is; true that for the lower categories of posts for which the SSC makes the? recruitment, there
would be greater dcnand fbr ccntres in small town5 and rural areas. BLCQ ne +eel that steps to increase the number of centres far the Preliminary Examination woufd go a lcng way in enablinq larger number of candidates to have the facility nearer hone. It will a-lso increase their awareness about the Civil Services Examination ~tsslf.In view of tn~above we reccmrnend larger number cf centre3 than the e::isting 39 centres for-the ;’rsliminar-y E:~araInat,im7 in dif iErrent parts 0.f the camtry to be seiecrec; in consultaticn with the State 3ovrr-n.iwit% and the Zf+,:.:-m Terri tnries Acm?inistraij.cns,
4.04     DISSEMIN&TIDN OF lNFERMQtION CIECUT WRXOUS SERVICES FOR THE CIVIL SERVICES EXAMINRTION HELD EVERY YEC\R.
6.0401 At prcsent.the notification in the @?;iica! Gaz~tte t-egar.di,riy kt,e CiviI Servizes E;.:acninati.on ~anLc2i.n~.intor a1ia.a list of name5 of services, with their grades and scales of pay for which recruitment is
made.  It  does  not  contain  any  cthsr  relevant 
informa tion,  which  would  give :  a clea r pictu re of  the 

duties and responsibilities and career prospects cf such seiv.ices. During our visits, i3 large number of officers of the post-1979 batches and others represented that the scanty infwmetion available in the Offdcal Gazette about the career procipcts of different sarviccs did not enable them to exercise their choice of service correctly. They pointed out that most of the candidates are generally aware of career p-ospec:ts of the All -India Services,viz. IAS and IPS and some of the more preferred Central Services. Most of them are, however, not aware 01 the career prospects of many of the Central Services. Some of the post-1979 entrants admitted bcfare 1.15 that sincE they did not knew anything about the nature u.f duties anU cireer praspects 0.f various services, they indicated their preferences for services
ds per the serial order in which  the di-fferent  services 
were  listed  in  the Gfficsl Gazette,  an  the  mistaken 
bellsf  that  5uch serial ardsr  indica”!:  the  relative 

mportance of the different Services.
6.0402 It is true that some successful candidates try on their own to Know mors about a service before e::crcising their final option. Rut it beccnes difficult for most of them to kncw the prospects of a iarqn number of services to which recruitment is maze throur;h the Civi1 Services Examination.
6.0403 Since choice of service is crucial for a candidate’s official career and since diiferent services have different career prospects, it would be useful if more information is furnished in the Offical Gazette about the various services for which the Civil Services Examination is held every year. It would enable the candidates to exercise a meaningful choice in ttre matter
-133-
of selection of eervice.
6.0404 During our visits, we also found that the students in colleges and universities, which are in rural and semi-urban areas of the country, become aware of the Civil Services Examination quite late in their acadsmic career. Lack of proper awareness of the scheme far such examination, puts the rural and semi-urban candidates at a qreai cisadvantage. Some of them who are bright and b<i.ve t!?e pctentral. to compete. start thinking about a czr-eer in Civil Ser-vice, cn?y when they are in the colleges. in cmtrast, their city-based counterparts 3i-e much more awarq 51′ the scheme of tne Examination and *van ~7f t.tre d&ai led svl lab].. 5rcater awzreness enables them t~ start think-iny for the Exanination quite early in their career and qet an edge over their vura3-
and semi-ur ban caunter-parts.
6.9405 Wr. therefore, reccmmend that there stiocild be adfcuata ptiblic-ty ibcsut thE Civil Services Examination thraugh the prrnt and the electronic med;a. Flt present, the Directorate of kdvertising and Visual Publicity (DCIVP) publishes the Notsfication regarding the Civil Services Examination every year in the ‘Employment News . Even this publication does not reach all Senior
Secondary  schools and colleges in the country.  In  our 
view,  steps  should  be  taken  to  strengthen  the 
distribution system of such publications. 

6
0406 We feel it will be useful if attractive brochures are specially prepared to kindle interest among young students about the Zivi1 Services Examination. Such material cshould be distributed on a wide scal..;. specially to the Peadr of Educational Institutions n rural areas and small towns.
6.0407 Me also recommend introduction of special programme in Doordarshan/&IR tor providing greater in.formatiQn regarding the scheme of the Civil Service ExaminatSon. The State Governnents and Administrators of Un-on Territories can help in this process; the Directorates at Employment and Training, which have a network uf offices can act as channels to spread informaticn and knowledge regardAng the Civil Services Examination. We feel tbat greater awareness of the scheme of the Examination would enable candidates from all social strata to successfully compete for it and thus the base of the higher Civil Service would be
suitably strengthened.

6.05 SYLlhBUS OF THE CIVIL SERVICES EXAMINhTION:
6.0301 During our discussion with senior academics of Universities in different parts of the cvuntry, we came across some views on the syllabi of optional subjectm
ot the Civil Services Examination. While some academics bere of the opinion that by and large, the syllabi were framed in a comprehensive manner, some others felt that the syllabi of a few optional subjects were framed on the models adopted by selected Universities.
6.Q3Q2 We have reviewed the present system in the UPSC for framing and revising the syllabi o optional subjects for the Civil Services Examination. At present, this work has been entrusted to a high-level Syllabus Sub-Committee, consisting af three Members of the UPSC. The Su5-Ccmmittee selects four academic experts from Universities/Academic Bodies drawn froa different parts of the country for either framing or revising the syll.abu5 of an optional subJec.t. These experts are suoplied the existing syllabus of the particular optional subject for revising it and also for making it more comprehensive, inter alia, taking into account’ the latrst developments in the subject. The draft syllaixis is thereafter discussed by the Syllabus Sub-Committee, who finalise it with the assistance of different groups of experts.
6.0503 The above expert5 are selected carefullv to ensure that they repre%mt the Universities from different parts of the country so that in framing the syllabi of optional subjects for the Civil S=rv ces Examination, there is neither any bias nor any disproportionate weightage tu the rylla4i of either any
particular University or some selected Universities.
6.0504 At present, in the Civil Services Examination, there is nc prescribed period for revising the syllabi of the optional subjects. Whereas the syllabi of some optional subjects have been spelled out in detail and revisea at l=ast once after 1979, in case of scme others the same has not been revised at all, during the last decade. There may be a need for revision of syllabi to
keep pace with such revisicns iri our Universities.
6.0305 The University Grants Conimissron have framed model syllabi on a number of subj€?CtS taught in the Universities. These could serve as useful gcdus.
6.OSO6 bJe recommend that OTCZ In five years, ths syllabi of optional subje-ks 0-f the Civil Snrvices Examination may be revised arid bpdated. We have already observed that .the threshcld of bi.fflc.cllty in each optional subject s.l~ouldbe 4s nearly equal as possible. To ensure this, and bearinc; in inind the developments in the subjects, we recommend that the suflabus of each optional scibject should be spelt out comprehensively afid revised and updated every five years or more oftfm.
-1.43-
Mate -1. 4984 b 1985 J9a6 b 1987 Lo* Incow Group Belw R5. 1009 &Ion Rs. LSOO Hiddlr Incore Rr. IO00-30W Rr. 1500-3500 High lncw Sroup bkrvr Rs. SOCO Above Rs. 3500
1. Figurns nithin parenthesis indicate prrctntrgr.
-144 –
TABLE -2
IAS ETC. EXAMINATION / CIVIL SERVICES EXCIt4INATION I SUCCESS RATIO OF WOMEN CANDIDATES
Year  Appeared  In Examination — Recommended for Appointment 
A1 1  Women  Percentage of  Idomen  A11  Women  Percentage Of Women 
Candidates  Candidates 
19S1  3233  NA  NA  221  4  1.7% 
+9ss  4541  NA  NA  949  6  1.8% 
1760  3873  1-57  2.2%  573  =  1.3% 
1965  4501  160  3.6%  424  24  5.6% 
1970  &730  454  6.ox  428  SO  11.7% 
1971  7632  997  7.B%  541’  67  12.4% 
1972  8424  624  7.4%  549  64  11.7% 
1973  12623  988  7.8%  59I  73  32.7% 
1974  14048  Y52  6.8%  61 1  69  11.3% 
1979t  67615..  7020  10.4%  7412  62  11.7% 
1980  NA  NA  rJA  747  79  10.6X 

-145-Continuedl-
0

M
n

4
*
+
a
a

Y
a
z
a

z

W
t

0

z
TABLE -s
FIROT CLASS DEGREE HOLDERS AMQN08T SUCCESSFUL CANDIDCITES

-147 –
TABLE -4
NUMBER OF CANUIDATES BELQNQING TO THE SCHEDULED CASTES AND THE SCHEDULED TRIBES WHO WERE RECOMMENDED FOR APPOINTMENT ON THE BASIS OF THE RESULTS OF THE CIVIL SERVICES EXAMINATION DliRfNG THE PERIOD 1979 TO 1987.
-148 –

TCIBLE
NUMBER OF SCHEDULED CASTE,S AND SCHEDULED TRIBES CANDIDATES SELECTED UNDER GENERAL STANDARDS IN THE. CIVIL SERVICES EXAMINATIONS DURING THE PERIOD 1983 -1987.
~~
GeneraJ, sc     ST
1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1YEG lY84 1985 1986 1987 1983 1984 1985 1984 1987
1.
No. ot candidates —–22 10 8 24 21 7 2 5 S 5 selected under general standard

2.    
Total number of 630 614 597 6’51 625 l40 129 126 151 130 75 71 67 74 42 cahdidatee recommended for appointment

-149 –
Year of No. of Examination
1975
1976
1977
1978

Note : 1.
2.
TABLE -6
COMMONALITY BETWEEN ‘THE MERIT LISTS OF IAs/IFS dr CENTRAL SERVICES AND IAS/IF’S 84 IPS IPI THE IACi ETC. EXAIlINfi’rTClNS FHUM 1975 TO 197R
General Vacancies NLimbrr irf l&S,’IFS Selectees who were in IAS b IFS on the top of merit li’gt for
Iridian     Police Servjcc ( II’S )
127  11.3  (88.9) 
154  114  (f35.1) 
117  306  (89.1) 
1li>  93  (84,s) 

Merit list of Central Service 4 IFS tiere scrutinised upto the rank equa tu total Nw. of lienei-al Vaci<ncire for IliS & IF5 during the year.
Figures within brackets indicate percentages to total numbers of general vacancies in ICIS & IFS.
-150-
TABLE -7
PREFERENCE OF SUCCESSFUL GENERAL CANDIDATES FOR SERVICES EASED ON THE
INDEX ON INITIAL PREFERENCE.
~—–
61.No. Name of the services according to the Inde:: of Initial Preference
1979 i9ao 1981 148E 198: 1484 1985 1986 1987

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1. IAS IAS IAS IA9 IAS IAS ICIS IAS Ins
2. IFS IFS IFS IF5 .IFS IFS IFS IFS IFS
3. IPS ICFcCES IPS IPS IF’s IFS IPS IPS IPS
4. IITS I ITS I ITS IITS IITS Irrs IClkCES ICtCES IITS
5. ICLCES IPS IClkCES 1CLCES ICBCLS 1CKES I ITS I ITS IC&CES
6.
I9&AS IACAS IAtAS ICILAS IfiTS IRTS IRTS IRTS IRTS

7.
IHTS PlkTALFS IRTS .IRT’S IALnS IA&QS IALAS TALAS ICI&AS

8. IRAS IRTS IRPS IRfiS IRPS 1RFS IHPS IRAS IRPS
–I 51-Continuec
TCIBLE -7
-7
1 2 4 5 $5 7 0 9
9.  I  Po5t.S  I Post  s  IFiAS  1F\‘M  IHAS  IHPS  IRAS 
10.  PbTA&FS  IDffi  1:  POEt..S  I Poat.5  I Po5t.  s  I Post. s  I POST. 
11.  IDAS  IRAS  PE:TGLFS  PLTALFS  PbTAICFS  PdrTAdrFS  CTS 
12.  ICCIS  IRPS  ICn5  Ims  ICAS  CTS  PLTCICFS 
13.  IOFS  IOFS  IDAS  ICAS  IDAS  IDAS  IDAS 
14.  IVES  ICAS  IOFS  rOFS  CTS  ICAS  ICAS 
15.  – ASO-HFF  c Is  CIS  CIS  CIS  I IS 
16.  – IDES  CISLl-RPF  AYO-’RPF  IOFS  IOFS  IOF9 
17.  – – IDEG  Iruzj  IDES  IDES  IDES 
18.  .- – – – ASO-RPF  &SO-RPF  CISO-RPF 

Note:  (i)  Index of Initial preference ( for a particular – L  X  Number of candidates giving first.pref erenc‘e to that swvi ce  + 2 X  Number of candidates giving second preference to that service  +  .. 
service  –
Total Number-ot candidates giving some preference to that service 
-1sz-

ID
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TABLE -9
RECRUITMEWT BY IAS ETC./CIVIL SERVICES EXAMINATION (1950-1988)
I     –
Year No. of No. of No. of %age of Col. 4
Appl icantr;     Candidates Candidates to Col. 3 actual ly Recommended appeared for
appointment
1950
1951
1992
1953
1954

1955
19S6
1957
1958
1959

1960
1961
1962
1963
1764

3,647 2,797 240 8.58 4,219 3,2::3 251 7.15
0-3
4,427 3,341 La.. 6.94 5,043 3,582 199 5-53 6 627 4,471 186 4.16
6.659 4,451 340 7.49

7,568 5,l:i15 371 7.40 8,1339 J 9 245 305 3.02 Y,766 6,327 265 4.17 1,010 6,572 336 4.35
0,376 5,873 353 5.67 9,182 5,659 172 6.57 8,452 S,Z91 574 6.94
7.113 4,283 417 9.74 5,414 4,I305 468 11.68
-155-    Con tinwed/-
TABLE -9
1965 7,157 4,S0.J 4Zt S.46 1964 8,305 5 ,040 42.5 0.45
19h7 8,312 5,165 346 b. 70
1768 9 ,724 5,7i36
4 :,
6.20
1769  11.,302  6, S1.b  378  5.t30 
1970 1971  11,?1IlJ 13,538  b ,73Cl 7,692  4:a 542  6.36 7.1.0 
1972  17,b84  8,424  544  6.52 
1973 1974  31,07= ‘54,423m  12,623 14,048  591 611  4.68 4.95 
1975 1976 1917  2R151A 31,,739 .A1I 397-,.  1 5,5139 17,649 17,577  629 679 707  4.06 3.05 4.02 
1’778 1979  29,us4 1 .c:rt:1.7112  IY,91Y 67,C~lY  72i 😕 l:Jx  3.81 1.(34 
( 7 I 5tr5)  ( b ,B,l5)  ( 10.32 ) 

Continued/-
T6BLE -9
1980  89 $277  55,375  747.  1.39 
(9,6181  (8,366 )  ( 11.20 ) 
1981  94.419  57,465  071.  1.92 
1982  (9.617) 85,462  (8,4(,I:) ) 50,420  963  (10.39) 1.91 
1983  (9.873) ~~9,312 (10,621)  (8.684) 51;418 (9,354)  845  ( 1L .(-L91 1.64 9,03) 
1984 1985  1,30,942 ( 10,853 1 1,52,590  ( 9, sac)) 92,668 84,773  790 814  0.96 8.50) 0.85 
1986  (10,3761 1,63,53l:,  ( 9,485) 92’086  855  8.33) 0.93 
1987  (9,810) 1.46.631  (9.,02B) 83.471  827  9.47) 0.98 
i7,059)  (9,1<%b  (8.97) 
1988  1,45,012 (19,057)  85,OY 0 (not available)  Examination in progress –

Note :From the Examination for the year 1979, the existing three tyre system, Comprising of Preliminary & Main Exmiiiations follcrwad by the Interview Test was started as per the recoinmendatims of the Kothari Committee.
Figures in bracke’ts from 1979 onwaide, pertains to that of the Main Examination.
-157-

3

4
I
WO

Si-
in
PI

iaY
00
-4 c
TIY
CE

‘y E
LJC
I
I
TABLE
COEFFICIENT OF CORRELATION OF RECOMMENDED AND NOT’RECOMMENDED CANDIDATES ( i.e., CANDIGATES CALLED FOR THE INTERVIEW TEST BUT NOT SELECTED ) OF CIVIL SEAVICES EXAMlNATION 1983 TO 1987
GS L INTERVIEW TEST GS L OF OP & INTERVIEW TEST
Year RECM NREC RECM rmx RECM NREC
1983  0.008  0.062  0.111  -0.1O6  -0.076  0.010 
1984  0.032  0.114  13.1363  -0.113  -0.031  0.045 
1985  0.173  0.161  13. 090  -0.059  -0.086  -0.003 
1986  0.096  0.11:13  0.079  -0.057  -0.007  0.044 
1987  0.098  0.211  0.075  -0. 170  .  -0.100  0.038  I. 

Note GS General St~idies
Of5 Optional Papers
RECM Recommended Candidates
* Not Recommended CandidatesNHEC
-159-

TAKE -I2
rwoAlwlMOF SELECTEES IY THE IIITERVIEY TZ81,RF CIVIL SERVICES EXIUllYATIOWSl 1985 10 1987
AECORDIM 10 RuRIK/mIWUWUWD


Loratloo Personality Tat narks of Scbool I (major Category Less than 351 Lre lbac 351 but lrss lore tnan 602 Total t1W than or eauil to 601
-.1_–
(1) IZJ (31 (41 (5) I0 (71 181 (91 (10) :I11 1111 1131 (141
Villrqr 6m(Ra1 5 1 2 7b 68 b0 28 35 14 109 104 Bb
5.c. 1 4 3 47 60 45 3 4 3 S1 68 55
s.1. 1 3 25 23 20 3 2 1 29 28 21
lotrl 7 8 5 148 151 129 54 41 26 189 200 I62
13.711 (4.02) (3.111 (78.311 (75.511 (79.611 (18.011 (20.51) 117.321 (10011(10011 (10011
Tom 6NcraI Z 3 2 204 111 115 84 58 55 290 202 202
S.C. -I 32 31 29 4 8 3 36 41 33
S.T. -1 20 31 25 3 2 7 23 39 31
lotri 2 3 I 236 211 I97 91 68 b5 349 202 2U
(0.61) (1.11) (1.31) (73.41) (74.811 (74.11) (26.01) (14.111 ~24.41111~11(1001lf1001I
Ill (2) (31 (4) 15) (61 (7) (8) (9) 110) (11) (12) 113) 114)
City knrrrl 1 3 5 121 194 106 76 128 146 I98 323 U7

8.C. -2 33 32 29 4 8 13 39 42 42
8.1. I-12 3 82 4 2 15 7 10
4
rota1 2 5 5 I68 28 223 112 140 161 252 314 381
(0.81) (1.41) (1.31) (66.71) (bl.21) (57.31) (k?.51) (37.4X) (41.41) ~1001)(1001)(100X1
-161-

IARE -WA)
CIVIL SERVICES ( MI1 I EIIHfIATION 1984 CATEGORY-USE SEW-YISE IE DlSTRlllUTlOl I AS MI 01-081U41 OF IKL CAhlDlDATES RECOM(EIDE0
lor General sc Sl All Candidates I Carpicled year I Hale Ferile l~hl lrle Fearle Total I(tlr Ferrlr Total Hale Female Total

I 2 3 I 5 6 1 8 9 10 I1 12 13

21 24 7 31 I 0 1 0 0 0 25 1 32 12 54 19 13 5 0 S 3 0 3 62 19 81 25 91 20 I14 9 1 10 S 0 5 108 21 129 24 110 22 132 14 0 I4 10 0 10 134 22 156 25 115 15 130 12 0 I? 5 3 9 132 IS 150 2b b? Y 11 6 2 18 8 0 8 78 11 89 27 37 4 61 19 0 I9 9 1 10 85 5 90 28 0 0 0 1 n 1 8 0 b 15 0 IS 29 0 0 0 19 0 19 1 0 7 16 0 26 30 1 0 I 4 5 I b 6 b 11 0 11 31 I r, 1 17 0 i7 4 0 4 22 0 22 32 0 0 0 11 0 It 2 0 1 13 0 15 33 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tntrl 518 96 614 126 3 129 Ll 4 71 711 105 814
-16’2-
1
21

n

23
24

ts

2b
27

28 29
34

31
32
33

bttl
2

17
49

72
109

115
107
1M

0 0
I
0 0 0
514
3
3
14
7
17
10
11

7 0 0 0 0 0 0
69
I
20

b3
79
126
125

lie
I11
0
0

1 0 0 0
643

5

1
2
9
9
I2
IS

11
21

15
23
10

IS
0

143
6

0
1

0
0

1 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
3
7

1
s

9
P

13
15
11
21
15

24 10 15 0
IM

B
4
2

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9

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13
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0

0
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4
2

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8
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6 b
13
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3
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79

8
5
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53 6
127

135
130
121
21

za
4
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74
1s
n

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143

120
27

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22

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w
TABLE -1W)
CIVIL SEWICES (MINI EXlUlllATlON 1985
CATEGM(Y-YlSE AND SEI-MIS€ A6E DISIRIUTION
( AS OH 01-OE-ES ) of ALL CANDIDATES REUlAllLNDED

Ape 6~rral 1 CM~ldrd- sc  s1  All Candidates 
years 1  Wale  Fcrale  Total  Male  Ferr3  Total  Hila  Feiale  Total  Wale  Fmle  Total 
I  2  5  4  5  6  1  8  ?  10  I!  I2  13 

2l  29  I4  43  I  1  z  4  0  4  34  15  49 
22  55  6  61  3  0  3  6  I  7  64  7  71 
23  97  22  119  1  0  1  2  0  ?  LO6  22  128 
24  107  I5  122  9  0  9  4  I  5  I20  16  136 
25  129  11  140  12  0  12  7  0  7  I48  I1  159 
26  59  5  b4  12  0  12  14  2  I6  85  1  92 
11  13  4  41  15  0  1s  4  0  4  62  4  6  6 
?E  1  0  1  13  0  13  I  0  4  IU  0  I8 
2V  0  0  0  12  0  I2  6  0  b  IU  0  I8 
sa  0  0  0  14  0  I4  4  0  4  ie  0  18 
31  0  0  0  I1  0  I1  7  0  7  18  0  18 
P  0  0  0  16  0  16  1  0  1  17  0  17 
35  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 
Total  520  77  597  125  I  126  b3  I  67  701)  82  790 

CIVIL SERVICES MAIN) EVNINATION 1985 CAIEGORI-WISE AND SEX-WISE @S€ DlSlRIWT10N I AS ON 01-08-85 1 OF 4I.l CllYDlYlES POALlFlED IN WRITTEN BUT NOT RECOllllEIIDlD
kr (Corplck !cars)  Itah  knrral Ferrle  Total  llilr  sc Female  Total  Male  ST Feralc  Total  Hale  All Candidate# Fmlr Total 
~-~~ ~  ~  ~  ~- ~-
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  a  9  10  11  I2  13 
Zl n 23 24 25 26 27 21 29 so 31 32 33  23 40 W 123 124 97 56 0 1 I 0 0 0  7 ib I4 17 9 7 5 0 0 0 0 0 0  30 56 94 140 133 104 61 0 1 1 0 0 0  0 0 8 1 14 11 15 9 11 21 I4 I? 0  1 1 1 2 1 B 8 1 0 0 0 0 0  1 9 9 9 15 11 IS 10 I1 21 14 12 0  1 b 7 4 0 8 7 3 1 9 5 5 0  0 0 I 0 0 0 I 0 0 1 0 0 0  6 0 I 8 B 10 3 7 10 5 5 0 2  54 95 134 146 I16 ao 12 I9 31 19 17 0 25  8 17 I6 19 10 7 6 I 0 I 0 0 0  33 71 111 153 1% 123 0 6 13 19 32 IP 17 0 
Total  515  75  629  IS0  7  157  73  3  76  746  85  833 
-165-

CIVIL SERVICES MAIN) fXAIIIIIATION 1986 CATEGORY-MIL Ann SEI-YISE AGE oisinittuiim (RSDW 01-08-851 OF All CAWDIDAlCS RECMMUOED
A9@ 6eneral 5c ST All Candidates ( Corplctcdyerrr.1 nrlr Frirle Total Hale Fwla Totrl Hale Fecile Total Hale Feaile Total
~~ ~~~
1 ? 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
21 SO 9 59 I 1 1 k I 5 35 11 4b 22 12 20 PZ 5 I b 5 a s ez 21 10s 23 103 19 12) 15 I 14 b i 1 lz? 21 145 24 120 21 I41 10 3 13 7 0 7 137 24 111 25 126 la 144 16 1 17 3 1 4 145 20 165 2b 54 B b2 18 0 I8 11 0 I1 81 a 91 27 27 2 29 12 2 14 9 2 I1 48 An 28 0 0 0 16 0 16 4 1 5 20 I 21 29 2 0 2 12 0 12 4 0 4 18 0 18 30 0 0 0 16 0 16 6 0 6 22 0 22 31 0 0 0 I6 0 16 7 0 I 23 0 23 32 0 0 0 7 0 7 2 0 2 9 0 Y 53 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 534 97 631 142 9 131 ha 6 lk 144 112 036
TlKE -131F)
CIVIL IRVICES OIAIN) ~xniiumon19nt CATEWRV-MIS€ MD It-WISE A6E DISTRIWTION ( AS Ow 01-08-86 ) OF ALL CAllDIDATE$ WHILIFIED IN WRITTEN DUT NOT RECMIIENDED
A9e years ) t Cacplrtd  Hale  Gcnrrrl FHIh  Total  Llr.  sc Fmlc  Total  lalc  ST Ferilc  Total  Male  A11 Canlidrtrr FmIc Total 
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  I1  12  13 
21 23 24 23 26 21 28 30 31 32 33 22 29  M 79 140 I51 71 40 2 0 0 0 0 61 0  11 I1 16 14 4 3 0 0 0 0 0 21 0  31 90 156 lb5 75 45 2 0 0 0 0 82 6  2 8 11 14 14 20 14 17 1s 15 0 6 1S  1 1 2 I 0 6 1 1 0 0 0 2 0  3 9 13 IS I1 20 15 16 18 15 0 n 13  0 4 7 8 P 9 B b b 6 0 6 5  0 0 1 0 I 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0  0 4 E 8 10 8 7 b b 0 6 10 5  22 91 158 17s 69 24 23 24 21 0 73 94 18  12 12 19 15 5 4 1 0 0 0 n o2  31 103 177 188 99 73 23 21 21 0 96 ia25 
Total  561  60  611  152  9  Ibl  74  4  76  790  93  BBJ 
-167-

lABLE -13W
CIVIL SERVICES IMINI EXMINATION 1907 C~TE~Y-YISEAllD SEIYlsf ME DISTRIMIW I AS ON 01-08-87 I OF ML CMDIMTES REC#II(ENDED
m Bmeral sc ST All Caadid8tes 1 Cmplrled . pan I Nalc Fciile Total Nalc Fwlc Total Ialr Prmalc Total Wale Female Total
1 2 3 4 S b 1 8 9 10 !1 12 13
21 25 12 31 3 0 3 1 0 I 29 12 41 22 66 I4 80 b 1 7 5 0 S 77 13 92 23 I23 33 1% 8 1 9 9 0 9 140 34 174 21 148 26 I11 12 1 13 4 I 5 1h4 28 192 25 I54 21 115 10 I 11 11 1 I2 115 23 198 26 0 1 I 17 I 1s 4 1 5 21 3 24 21 0 0 0 I7 3 20 5 0 5 22 3 25 29 0 0 0 15 0 15 I2 1 13 I1 I 20 29 0 0 0 I6 0 lb 2 0 2 18 0 18 30 2 0 2 17 1 18 5 0 5 24 1 25 31 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 32 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 518 107 bZ5 I21 9 130 3 4 U 691 120 Ell
-168-
civn SWICES OMIN)~~aniwarioti1987 MlE60RV-YIsE A((D SLX-YISE A6L DISIRIWTIOW(as MI 01-08-87) oc IKL cnmDIoms WMIFIED IN YRITTEN WI  1101RECOMENDED 
w  Gmerrl  x  ST  All Canliditer 
Yr*r fCMPpl?&k  Hale  Fmle  Total  Nale  Fmala  Total  Nile  Feirle  Total  Hale  Feule  Total 
I  2  3  I  5  h  7  8  9  10  11  12  15 
21  Jl  13  44  2  2  4  2  0  2  35  1s  M 
n  58  20  78  5  0  3  I  0  4  b7  20  87 
n  115  IS  128  13  3  I&  7  1  8  IS3  19  152 
24  161  20  187  12  2  14  8  2  10  187  24  211 
25  196  22  218  IS  2  21  12  1  13  227  25  132 
26  0  0  0  17  0  17  9  0  P  26  0  26 
21  0  0  0  1s  0  1s  8  0  8  23  0  23 
20  I  0  I  22  0  22  b  0  h  27  0  2  9 
29  2  0  2  32  I  33  I1  0  I1  45  1  46 
50  0  0  0  20  0  20  E  2  10  ZI  2  3  0 
31  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 
32  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 
33  0  0  0  1  0  I  0  0  0  I  0  1 
Total  568  90  6511  158  10  168  75  6  El  801  106  907 

-169-

~MLE-141~) BE-MISE DISTRIBUIIWIOF PLACE OF 8IRIHlRESIDENCE O!! ALL GENERbL SELECTED CbMDIDRIES OF CIVIL SERVICESEYllN#TlOll 1984 TO 1987
Age Group (1san tk dry Test 1 of Interview  Year of CS 11) eru  Plicr of Birth  Locrtian af School (hior tire spent) – Place of residence after HiQher Secondary ma*. (Nuor time rpmt) –
Village  lolln  Citi  Village  lown  City  Villrqc  Ion,  City 
ill  I71  I31  I0  151  (61  (71  181  I91  110)  I111 
2t-23  1984 1986 1987 178:  21 19 26 20  55 70 56 49  54 43 78 84  12 9 15 1s  51 62 40 45  13 61 97 95  1 -3 1  S9 41 23 18  96 91 134 134 
23-26 26-28  1984 1985 1986 im7 1985 1984 1986 1787  102 101 105 119 s2 45 35 I  160 177 144 160 39 32 19  87 87 148 189 2k 22 18 I  63 62 65 71 31 38 25 I  164 187 1M 156 51 40 23  132 116 202 241 35 21 24i I  16 7 14 10 8 lb 5  1M 131 80 85 58 42 21 I  179 221 303 373 49 41 46 I 

-170-Continucdl-
nbpvc 1%     1984 2 2 2 2 5 1 1985 1 1 1 1986 1 1 1 1 1 1 1987 1 1 1 1 1 I
TOkl     1984 183 2% 175 lOE 268 238 25 2M 323 1985 1b5 280 152 109 290 198 23 215 359 1986 167 220 241 109 202 325 22 123 484 1987 141 210 274 86 202 337 11 105 509
Notcc 1. During 1984 & 1985
City I bbq, Calcutta, Dclbi, Madras, Ahacdrbad, Banglore, Chdiqarh
Hydcrabad, Jaipur, Lucknoat, Pitnr id Punr
lovl :All th town a6 prr 1981 CMSUS Le., all phCC5 uth llunieipal
Corprrtion, Municipal Board, Cantonerent Board or Notified Torn Arra etc.
Village :Other thin cities & torn as defined above

2     .The rlsssificition of villagcs, tom and city during l9Bb and 1907 has bwn done
by thc tmdidater themselves

-171-
~~UISEOISRIMTIONOF a RAEE IMLEIEW CMIDIDATESWEEFWMIIITERVIEI
OF BIRNIIRESIOEIICE TEN WT wof FIWLV SLLtClD (NOH-SELECTEES) OF CIVIL SERVICES EXWlYAllRN 198k 70 1987
S6rwc  Year of CS INJ ene  Plirr of Birtb  Loatian of Schwl  Plrn of raidmce after 
1JI on tb day of lntervir  oldor tile rpmt)  Higher secondary em. Wor tim spat) 
Test ) 
Village  lwn  Citi  Village  Tam  City  Villqe  Tom  City 

21-23     1981 1985 l9Rb 1987
23-26     1Wk 1965 1% imi
14-20     lW4 1985
1986 1987
17
I9
32 29
143 120 1kO 1ps
BB 61
51
37 25
ko

51
119 110 125 144
49 40 23 1
50
15

66 77
87 144 144 169
48 31 20 1
11 12 19 19
b7
63

83 109
62
30 38 I
40 31 41 47
146 118 lk4 173
56 59 31 1
SS

66

78 91
116 19s 182 216
bl
36

26
1 2) 77 3 23 83 2 23 113 3 26 128
I4 110 225 50 112 232 12 100 297 17 124 357
1# 62 105 13 21 92 7 55 SJ 2
-172-

IABLE -141C)
W-YISE DISTRIIIION OF PLACE OF BIRTH/RESILWCE OF ALL S.C. SEl ECTED CAWIDATES OF
CIVIL SERVICES EIAhlNfTloW 1984 TO 1987 
Ape Group  Year of CS 111) mi  Place of Birth  Location of School  Place of rrridmcr after 
(as on the day Test I of lntrrvicr  (hrjor tine spent)  Higher Secondary em. Itlalor tin rpentl 
Village  lorn  City  Village  lorn – City Villrqr  Tow  City 
111  12)  13)  (41  15)  Ibl  (7)  18)  (91  (10)  (.Ill 
21-23  iw  2  I  1  I  1  5  1  6 
1905  4  I  2  3  5 
1986  3  1  7  2  I  8  1  I  9 
1987  3  2  5  1  2  6  2  7 
23-26  1984  20  11  6  11  13  13  6  I1  10 
198%  19  10  4  11  11  I1  3  8  2  2 
1985  22  14  9  18  14  13  s  9  31 
1987  21  ~  10  16  5  16  2  13  24 
2k-20  I984  22  I  4  1s  10  5  6  10  14 
1985  14  I1  2  9  9  9  A  6  15 
198b  21  7  5  14  10  9  4  I2  17 
1987  21  15  5  la  17  9  7  10  25 
-174- Continued/-

Abort 20  im4 ims l9lM 1987  17 38 50 29  7 I6 7 4  1 7 5 7  33 29 34 10  14 I6 16 9  8 :! 11  18 12 10 I0  18 18 15 $  2  19 31 31 5 
Total  1984 1965 190) 1987  91 15 9C 14  26 31 29 29  12 14 Ib 27  bO 51 68 35  38 36 41 33  31 39 42 42  30 21 20 19  40 32 37 30  59 13 94 81 
Note: 1. Ourin9 1984 4 1985 City :Boabay, Calcuttr, Delhi, Iladras, Abedabrd, Banglore, Chandigarh lw I bll thc town as per 1981 ~MJYSIA, all places with Municipal Hyderabad, Iaipur, LucLnov, Patni and Punr Cnrparation, pmicipal Bawd, Cantoneant Board or Notified Town Lrci etc. Villape t Otber than cities & tom as defined above 
2 . The classification of villaper, tom and city during 1906 and 1987 has been done by the candidates thnselver 

-175-
ma€-IWI
h6E-YISE DlSIAIBUIlDll OF PLLCE OF BIRIH/RESIDENCEOF ML 5.C. WllDAlES CAUlED foll M INTERVIEY IEST IUI NOT flMLLV SELECIEB [ NI-SELECIEES t 0 CIVIL SERVICES ElllllNlllON 1984 TO 1987
Ip Grwp Yew of CS Ill1 exae Plarr of Birth Location of School Place of residonci after Inon the dq Illajar tire spent] Highar Gccondrry ixu of Interview Major tire spent) lest )
Villaqc Tom Cfty Village loan City Uillaqe 1m City
21-2s  l98k  2  4  2  3  3  3  5 
1985  7  7  5  B  1  I  12  I 
l9Eb  3  1  2  1  4  6  – 11 
1987  3  3  b  1  I  10  1  1  10 
23-21  198k  23  3  2  12  14  2  5  14  9 
1983  18  8  4  9  14  7  5  I6  11 
l9Bb  18  5  I2  I1  8  Ib  E  4  23 
1987  24  13  15  12  IS  25  I  8  43 
26-28.  1984  21  5  3  I1  LO  8  7  10  12 
IPP5  I1  5  3  11  13  I  s  14  6 
19Uh  25  4  1:  20  6  14  6  11  23 
l?87  20  S  11  16  8  I?  5  b  25 

-116-CMtiaUclll-
TABLE -1401
llbwr 28  1988 1985 lpBl 1987  66 45 52 34  11 I4 9 b  4 I 14 7  48 3s 44 36  28 20 I4 17  S 8 17 14  27 21 21 11  31 33 14 22  23 12 54 34 
Total  1984 IW IW6 1w7  112 87 98 101  23 34 14 27  I1 I4 39 39  71 L3 76 b5  55 55 32 41  26 17 53 61  39 30 41 18  58 IS 29 37  49 54 31 112 
Mote8 1. During 1984 b 1985 City t Boabay, Calcutta, Drlhi, Nadrar, Ahiedrbrd, Panglore, Chandigrrh TOM I 111 the tom as per 1981 census Len, a11 place5 with lunicipal Hyderabad, Jaipur, lucknow, Patna and Punc Corpontiw, lknicipal hid, Cmtonrmnt hard or lbtifid Torn Araa etr. Villaqi 3 0th than cities L town 16 definrd above 
2 .Thr classificati~~of villaper, torn and city during 1986 and 1987 has been dm by the candidates theiselvrr 

-177-
116ErISE DiSTRIlUTION MI PLACE OF WlRTHlRESIDENCE OF ALL 5.1. SELECTED CANDIDATES (IF
CIVIL SERVICES EXAMINATION 19U4 TO 1117
Age Grou~ rear of CS (MI elam Place of Birth Lucation of School Place of rrrAdencrafter 11s an the day (hior time pent) Higher Secondary exaa. of Intrrvren (Halor tiwe spent] lest )
Village Town City Vhllagc Tom Citi Village Tun City
111 12) 151 10 151 I61 17) (81 (91 1101 1111

21-23     1984 3 1 I 3 1 2 I 1985 h 3 2 2 b 3 1 3 7 1986 b 5 z 7 2 S 6 1907 3 4 -b 1 4 5
23-26     1984 14 9 1 11 13 2 1s 7 1ms 9 1, b 7 1, 6 3 6 I2 1986 14 I 8 9 I 2 6 10 I981 14 I1 3 I1 11 b b b 1b
26-20     I914 I4 1 9 6 2 8 5 1985 10 2 1 7 L 1 b 1086 13 7 I !I I1 2 5 10 0 1987 n 3 1 b s I 2 5 5
-178-    Contlnuedl-
nbpve 28  1984 1985 1W6 ioai  25 2Q 20 10  3 1 4 4  -1 -1  19 13 10 4  ? 5 12 P  4 2 2  4 4 I 1  21 10 8 3  3 8 1s 11 
Total  56 43 53 35  14 11 20 22  1 I0 5 1  40 29 2: 28  31 25 31 39  15 7 10  9 fi 6 1  4b 26 29 18  16 53 J9 35 
Note: 1.’ lurinq 1984 4 1985 Citi :Boibay, Calcutta, Delhi, Irdrrs, Ihradrbrd, Jmqlorn, Chrndigirh Town I All the ta as per 1981 census i.e., all places with Runicipal Hydrnbad, Jaipor, Lucknw, Patna ml Pune Corporation, llunicipal hard, Cantmeient Board or Ltifird 10m Area etc.. Village :Other than cities itom a%defined above 
2 .The classification of villages, ton and city during 1906 and 1987 has km done by the candidates therrrlvrr 

-179-
TABLE -II(FI
Aqe GrwpIrr on the day ot Interview lest I  Year. of ES (I) paan  Place of Birth  Location of ScImoI (fhJOr t1M Spent)  Plrrr of residence rftw Higher Secondary em. [Ilajor tire spent) 
Villa9~  Tono  City  Village  Tows  City  Village  Town  City 
21-23  1984 1WS IWb 1961  U b 3 b  1 4 ? 3  6 5 1 4  3 5 4 5  3 2 1  3 5 3 I  3 3 2 1 
23-2b  1984 1985 1986 1987  1s Ik 17 21  b 4 b 8  -I  1 s I? 11  11 12 7 17  1 I 3 2  3 3 5 3  I2 I2 7 I4  4 3 I1 13 
26-20  19e4 ms 1986 1981  15 14 16 13  2 5 4 4  –1  I1 10 11 9  6 9 7 8  3  5 E 4 3  11 b 9 b  I 5 E 8 

-Ian-tontinuldl-
(1) 121 131 14) 151 fbl (7) 181 191 I101 1111
Above 28     1984 33 I 23 8 3 4 22 8 1985 23 b -15 13 I 7 19 3 1986 21 2 -I9 9 1 9 7 13 1987 20 4 1 11 11 3 3 b Ib
Ma1     1984 69 9 1 47 28 4 15 48 16 1985 51 19 -35 59 2 20 42 14 1986 bS I4 1 44 27 7 18 26 34 1987 60 19 2 ss 41 3 10 27 44
note: I. During i~a4I 1985 City :Barbay, Calcutta, Delhi, Hadras, Ahudabad, Ranglorc, Chmdiqarh Hyderabad, Jaipur, Luctnou, Patna and Punc TOM I LlI the town as per IP& censu8 i.e., ell places with bicipal Corporation, hiciprl Board, Cantonment hard or Notified lam Rrea etc. Villaqe IOther than ritier k torn a5 defined above
2     .The claitifieation of villapcr, town an6 city durinp lW6 and 1987 has hm dmc by the candiditrr thmclves
TABLE  – 15 
NUMBER OF CANDIDATES WITH CIGE MORE THAN 24 YEARS 
WHO  GOT SELECTED IN IPS DlJRINti THE CS EXAMINATIONS,  1984 TO  1987 
Category  1984  1985  1986  1987 

General 63 70.8) 62 (69.7 57 i64.8) 53 (65.4 SC 16 04.1) 16 (94.1 26 (78.8) 14 (82.4 ST 8 8R.9) 7 (77.7 12 (85.7) 5 (71.4
Total €Is (73.9) es (73.91 95 (70.4) 72 (68.6)
NB:     Figures in bracket indicates the percentage to total number ot candrdates who got into IPS.
TABLE -16 
Location of 5chl Studied for the where candidates Uor parts ot ~ h lducatia  Year of uu CSIIl  1AS IFS IPS lurbrr of candidates with age Lure than Zb years (age a5 on 1st Aupustl  Group’l’  Grouo’)’ 
1  2  3  I  5  b  1  B  9  10  11  12  15  I4  15  I6  17 
VILLn6E  I904 ims 1916 I987  4 0  7 5 6 2  3 I 2 I  I  9 2 b  6 7 ? 2  4 2 5 2  16 21 I? – 19 12 20 22  15 10 7 6  7 0 6 I  15 16 13 Ib  7 0 4 3 
Twy  1904 19M In 1987  0 4 3  2 7 3  3 I I 2  I  I 1  -1  8 10 7  4 1 7 2’  4 3 6 1  10 18 18  11 13 10 B  5 0 8 5  2  0 15 9 I  1 11 8 11  4 I 10 b 
CITY  1984 1915 1916 1987  2 If 3  1 4 4 6  I  1  1 2  7 3  3 2 3 3  — 24 3 IS 1  7 7 4 9  -1 1 2  10 7 5  3 5 10 3  I 1 
-185- Coatikardl-

1  2  3  4  5  6  1  8  P  10  11  12  15  I4  15  th  11 
NOT ~mrm  1984 1986 1987 1985  1  –
Total  1984 1985 1986 1987  14 23 6 – 11 16 10 11  h 5 I 3  1 1  3 3  –1 – 15 13 24  11 21 1 13  8 5 11 3  58 44 50 I  57 32 34 39  20 19 16 13  SB 2) 20 2  26 31 31 SO  11 15 15 10 
Note;, I. During 1984 b 1985 City :Bnrbai, Calcutta, klhi, Madras, Abredabad, Banglore, thandijwh Toan :All the toun 65 per 1981 census i.e., all plates, rith hniciprl Hydcrabad, Jaiyur, lucknow, Patna and Pune Corporation, Lnicipal Board, Cantonelint Board or Nutifled Tom Area #tc. V11Iaqe :Other than cities b tarn as defined above 
2 .The clisrification of villqcs, torn and city durinq 1986 and 1’187 has been done bi the candidates tkarelvob 

-184-
1 9 I I L I r 1861 2 t 8 r tl 6 I 9 r i I 9841 VJVU r f 11 I B 01 -2 t I i 2 SBhl Ibepwaag 2 S E E 01 2 I T I tYI JW!H
z S I 2 zr -I r 1 9 fob1 z 9 1 1 11 B S E 1 T r E r 9861 PJrPws b 0 t S L 9 I I 2 I I E 9 fBh1 4101 wa S LI rt 11 81 81 9 1 01 -r S E M61
TRME -I7
1 2     3 4 5 b 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 13 Ib 17
Graduate/     1981 8 2 I4 1 I 35 3 3 19 2 i
Port Sraduatc     11s 13 2 1 1 I 9 z 2 21 2 1 10 7 2 l98b 5 I I I h 5 3 29 1 19 B b 117 3 2 I 9 J 9 2
1984     3 2 1 1
NO1 REPORTED     1985 I I 1 1986 R87 . —
Tot31     1984 14 1.1 6 -21 13 a 58 37 20 38 26 11 1985 23 A6 5 1 5 -I5 11 5 44 32 19 29 31 13 1986 6 I0 4 1 3 -15 2; 11 50 34 lb 20 $1 IS 1987 -I1 S A 1 J I 39 2 !4 10
1:
-196-
SERVfCE-WISE AKO CATEGORY-WISE llDWYHLY ICOllE OF FATHER/GUARDII\W of SELECTEES WITH A6E MORE lHAK 2b YEARS IN THE CIVIL SERVICES EXAHIUIIONS, 1964 TO 1967
Incore Group Year of llurbrr of candidates with age rare than 26 years (ape as MI 1st August1
cslal
lXIR 11)s US IPS Group’A’ Grwp’B’

Gmerrl SC 51 General SC Sl Gcneral SC 51 General SC ST General SC 51
I 2 3 15 6 7 8 9 I0 I1 12 13 14 15 16 11
1984 5 8 3 4 6 5 17 17 10 I1 I7 6 La lncw 1985 8 12 4 2 b 5 4 17 19 7 12 21 11 Grwp 1916 7 2 3 3 12 6 20 21 12 b 20 9
1987 b I I 4 3 1 29 7 -19 6
19114 6 3 3 -13 2 2 26 12 4 15 1 5 lliddlr lncow 1985 8 3 I 8 2 -20 9 7 9 7 Grwp 19%6 3 2 2 b 7 3 17 I1 1 10 6 5
1907 4 2 2 b k 1 6 3
IpB4 3 b 2 1 13 3 5 I1 1 Hiqh Incase 1985 7 1 1 1 1 2 I 6 3 4 7 2 2 Group lpBb 3 1 1 4 1 I 15 1 3 4 2 I
1987 I I I 2 I 5 i
-187-Continuedl-
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  I4  15  1h  17 
tat REPORTED  1981 1% I987 ion  – – 1  I 2 1 – 1 – 2 1 – 5 I 1  I 1. – 1 I – I 1 1-
Total  1W4 l9R5 198h 1987  14 23 6 – 11 16 10 I1  h 5 k 3  1 1  3 3  —1  24 1s 13  11 11 21 7  8 5 11 3  $8 41 50 1  51 32 34 39  20 19 16 13  38 19 20 2  26 31 31 so  11 13 15 I0 
Mate  1. Lsr Incore Group  1984 i 1985—_—Below Rs.10001-p.8.  1986 L 1981———blow Rr.lS0OI-p.8. 
2. Riddle Incm Qroup R6.1000-3600/- p.8.  Rr. 1300 -35M)I-par. 
3. Hiqh Incow Grwp  Above R1.30001-p.8.  Obovr R1.3503I- per. 

TABLE -19(A)
MERIT RCINK WISE NUMBER OF ATTEMPTS MADE RY GENERAL SELECTEES OF THE CIVIL PJERVICES EXAMINATION 1984
Merit RsnC5
Age as on No. of 1-100 101-20r:) 201–300 301-400 401-500 901-L~:~CI Above 699 Total 1st CIuqust Attempts
1 2     7 4 9 b 7 8 9 10
-~
21-22     1 27
..
2

3     ..
Not Reported     4
22-23     1 38 2 35-3 –
Not Reported
23-24     1 42 2 SO
3     20

Not Reoorted     2
24-25     1 41 2 58 3 33
Not Reported     –
-189-    Conbinued/-

TABLE -19(B)
MERIT RANK-WISE NUMBER OF ATTEMPTS MADE BY GENERAL SELECTEES OF THE
CIVIL’SERVICES EXAMINATION 1985 ACCORDING TO VARIOUS AGE GROUPS

Merit Hanks
1 2     3 4 3 6 7 8 9 10
21-22     1 ti 7 5 5 9 8 2 41 3 2 ——–
Not Reported –1 1 —2
22-73     1 4 4 7 7 6 10 -38 2 6 2 4 3 1 -23
3 —c, —–
Not Reported ——–
23-24     1 6 3 4 11 8 5 -37
2 12 7 9 19 6 17 1 62
3 4 3 5 5 1 1 -19
Not Reported —–    –
1     1
24-25 1 1 4 IS 1 4 3 -16 2 11 14 17 19 9 12 3 31 3 4 1 b 2 9 5 1 24 Not Reported —1 —1
-191-    Continuedl-
1 2     3 4 5 b 7 8 9 10
-.
&
25–24     1 4 4 1 19 2 9 10 8 6 1 92 3 11 7 151 5 -47
..     —
Not Reported     1 7
26-27     1 1 1. 3 2 5 5 4 21
3 5 6 7     39
Not Reported     1
27-28 1 1 2 2 3 9 3 4 36 Not Reported
Rbove 28     1
3

3
Not Reported
Total     1 19 22 26 92 3 156 2 47 4t! 44 41 5 249
->
3 34 :35     -, 19 1 105
i

Not Reported     2 1 1 7
-192-

TABLE -19(C) MERIT ReNK-WISE NUMBER OF ATTEMPTS MADE BY GENERAL SELECTEES OF THE CIVIL SERVICES EXWINATION 19% ACCORDING Tit VARlOUS AGE GROUP llrrrt Ranks
21-22     1 6 2

3
Not Reported     1
22-23     1 4 a 6 3 4R
2     4 4 6 4 44
3
Not Reported
23-24     1 3 7 5
2 13 11 13
3     1 1 4

Not Reported —

24-25     1 2 2 2 1 11
L
12 11 13 14 6 77
T
.-.     8 7 7 7 7 53
–. –    –
Not Reported
-193-    Continued/-
44
Ia4 I
N
IiII N141 I1 I
11.01 Iill b0.r I
4!-IsJ ! I -la i 144-i I!Il
d
N rl.3 : I !-! vi! I!
ii
:49-J I
4*!

4
tl

0
i

9 h

I.4 I:]
I I
U7 -4
ri P!
!!I!
a

0

+j
L 4 C-i r1 0
a

I

LK

W
0:

-9
-9
0
z

MERIT RAN-WISE NUItBER OF AITEWTTS MARE BY GENERAL S€LECIEES OF CIVIL SERVICES EIAIIIWhTIMI 1987
21-22 I I2 13 12 7 15 10 1 10 2 7 9 7 9 3 ? 5 I? 3 Yat Reported
22-23 1 9 3 8 14 7 10 1 52 2 12 8 I1 12 12 IS 8 76 3 h 2 6 5 7 2 28 Not Reported
23-1) 1 3 b ? 1 1 2 2 10 2 I4 19 ‘I 19 13 12 11 97 3 B .I3 I! 5 e 7 7 59 Not Reported
24-25 1 2 2 1 1 6 2 4 5 3 b 5 4 1 50 3 19 20 23. 17 I9 29 I2 139 Not Reported
25-26 1
1
3 1 I Not Reported
-195 -Contlnucdl-
,
I,,.
TABLE -ZOi1)
–..
AfiE I SEX WISE DlSTRlBUllON OF GENERAL SELECTEES OF CIVIL SERVICES EYtINIHtITION 1983 hCCORDIN6 TO IUNOER OF ATTERPTS
Aga 4 in HALE FElPLi ALL CMDIDATES CMpktrd —
Viars Wuibrr of atteipts made in CS(P) Number of atterpts nade in dSlPl Nurber of atteapts aide in CS(P) w CS((1) or CS(I) Or CS(I)
1 2 3 4     8: & rota! 1 2 3 I 11 I T.otal 1 2 5 I 11 I Total bare nore Wre
(I) (2) 13) (41 151 Ibl 171 I81 191 (10) 111) (I?! 113) (141 115) 1161
21
22 35 I 36 9     9 41 I IS
23 21 32 -59 13 9 .. 22 40 41 -a1
24 26 58 17 -101 3 I! -14 29 69 17 -115
25 23 43 27 -93 5 7 5 -15 26 SO 32 -LOB
26 !I 28 45 -85 5 5 I -I1 Ib 33 4? -96
21 5 I1 4e -84 2 L 4 5 33 50 -98
-197-    Continuedl-
6s

1 1 i bl s5 -01 17, c c 1 I lo b’7 bl ‘2 EL
I

N
I
c.

N
,.._I, I I,
"- ,  *  :  .  .  I 

….  a  ;  ,  :  I  1 
.-
e" 

c.-

m

0h
IlBLE -200)
ME’/ SEX WISE DlSlRlBUllON OF S.C. WON-SELECIEES I 1.e. CIlNDlDAlES C9!LED FOR THE INlERVIFY TEST BUT NOT SELECTED 1 OF CIVIL SLRVICES FIAIIIHAIION 1083 ACCORDING 10 NUWECA Ui RITlFPTS
-~–
‘Rqt I in MALE FEME ALL CAWDIDIIES Conpltted
Years hiber of attenptr nrJe in CSIP) Nuiber of atterpts bade in CStPi Nuiler of atteipts aide in CS(P1 or CSINI or CSI10 Or CSIM)
I ? 3 1 I1 L Totrl I 2 3 4 tt t Total 1 2 J k It L Total lore Bore Ifore
21 22 I I I 1 23 I 3 k I 1 1 k 5
I-
2k 1 8 9 I B 9 25 1 I I1 13 I 1 1 I 12 1k 26 1 7 6 .-I 1 1 8 9 27 1 I -IS 1; I 1 1 I -I6 18
Continuedl-

"-
0
N

N

I
TABLE -20(6)
R6E I SEX YISE DISTRIBUTIbN OF S.T. NON-SELECTEES ( i.c. CAIIDIDATES CALLED FOR THE INTERVIEY TEST BUT NOT FIMI.LY SELECTED 1 OF CIVIL SERVICES EXAlINRlIOW 1983 ACCORDING TO NUlBZR OF ATTEIWTS
llpc I Ih nnu fERALE ALL CANDlDdTES
CMplcted

Years lluibrr of attempts ride in CS(P1 Wunber of attenpts nadr in CS(P) Nunber of atterpts made in CS(PI or CSOI) or CS(l) Or CS(lI
21
22 2 2 2 2 23 1 3 4 I 3 4 24 2 2 4 2 2 4 25 1 5 b I 5 6 16 8 8 8 8 21 b b 1 1 1 7
237-Continuedl-
I-
1-

4

c1

I
TRBLE -20(71
R6E I SEX WISE DISTRIBUTION OF GENEflAL SELECTEES OF CIVIL SERVICES EXANINATION 1984
ACCOLDINE WJNIIHBER OF mwis

Age I in MALE FEMRLE 411 CAWDIDATE5 Cpnplctrd Years hibcr of attempts made in CS(P) Nuabet of atteipts lade in CSIPI Nuaber of attempts aide in CSIP) or CS(Nl or CSrtIl Or CSIAI
I 2 3 I11 & Iota1 1 2 J I 11 k Total I z 3 4 It 1 Total inre lore Hore
(I) (21 13) (I) 15) (61 I?) (6) 19) (101 (111 (12) 113) I141 (151 Ilb)
2!
22 21 3 -24 b 1 7 27 4 -31
23 27 27 -54 11 8 -I? 38 35 -73
24 38 38 16 2 94 I 12 I -20 I2 50 26 2 I14
25 35 51 24 -110 b B 8 . 22 I! 59 32 -112
2b 14 47 53 I 115 3 2 10 -15 17 IP b3 I 130
21 I 19 39 -b2 1 I 7 9 5 20 4h -71
-209-Continucdl-
I
i
I
=II
TABLE -20181
RM I SEI WISE DlSTRlBUTIMl OF MNERAL NOW-SELECTEES ( i.e. CANDIDATES CACLED FOR THE
*lNTERVlEY TEST BU1 NOT FINALLY SELECTED I OF CIVIL SERVICES ElANlWATIOW 1984
ACCORDIN0 TO NUMBER OF ATTEMPTS

Aqc t in nnLE FEWE 6LL CANDIDATES Completed Years lumber Cn attempts aade in CSlPl liuiLr of attempts made in CSlPI Number of attempts made in CSIPI or CSIII or CSINI Or CS(8l
1 2 5 4     tt & Total 1 2 3 4 81 b Total I 2 3 4 tl L Total lore more lore
21
22 17 -17 3     3 20 -?1
23 28 20 1 -49 b 8 -14 34 28 1 -b3
24 39 28 3 -72 I 5 I 7 40 33 b -79
25 27 56 25 1 109 4 7 b -17 31 b3 31 1 126
26 11 49 41 4 I15 3 2 5 -10 24 51 16 k 125
27 9 40 58 -107 2 3 5 1 I1 I1 43 b3 I UB
-211-    Continucdl-

TAKE -20191
116E I SEX WISE DISIRIWTIOII OF S.C. SELECTEES OF CIVIL SfRVlCES EKMIYIITIMI 1984
IICCORDIWG TO NWBER OF ATTERPTS

tqpl t in ME FElRlE Au CMDIDATES CMpjCted Years lumber of attempts made in CS(Pl Nwbcr of attempts madl In CSIPI lumber oi attempts udr in CSIP) or CSIM or CS(N) Or CSIH)
1 2 3 4     tt L Total I1 2 3 I 11 b Total 1 2 3 4 18 L Total wrc more ibrc
I
21
22 I 1     I 1
23 1 4 5     1 4 3
24 9 9     1 1 9 I 10
25 -14 14     -I4 I4
2k 1 1 10 12     I 1 10 12
27 1 7 8     2 2 1 9 10
-213-    Continuedl-

TARE -20(10)
116E I SEI WISE DISlRlATlMl OF S.C. MN-SELECTEES I i.c. ‘CANDIDATES CALLED FOR THE
IWlERVlEW TESl BUT NOT FINALLY ELECTED ) AT CIVIL SERVICES E)IAHINATION 1984
ACCORDING TO WER OF ATTEWTS

Age Iin ME     FEllKE ALL CANDIDATES
rears lurk, of attempts rrdr in CS(PI llurbrr of attcrptr made in C61P) krrbrr of atterptr ride in E(?l or CS(I) or CS(H) Or CSIN)
1 2 5 4     I1 I Total 1 2 3 4 It & Total 1 2 3 4 8: & Total rara Mre lore
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (b) (1,) In) (91 (10) (11) 1121 1131 (14) (151 (16)
21

22 1 1     1 1
23 2 2 1 1     3 3

24 9 9     9 1
25 9 9     9 1
26 -12 12     1 I -15 li
27 -15 15     -15 15
-215-    Continucdl-


4N 
4N 
… 
A  DIN 

n

N

+I
c

I)
N

N
*

m

c


c

m
I
0
v
m
nN
TAKE -201121
ME I SfI WISE OlSTRlBUllMl OF S.1. W-SELECTEES I i.e. CANDIDATES CALLED FOR THE INTERVIEW IEST BUT MI FlWLV SELECTED 1 OF CIVIL SERVICES ElAlllMTlON lP84 ACCWIDINB TO MBER OF ATTEHPTS
Aqe 1 in HALE FEHKE ALL CAIIDIDATES
Colplrted

Year8 Nurkr of atteaptr lade in CS(P) Number of attwptr ride in CSIP) Wuiber of atteiptr made in CSIP) or CSIHl or CSiIo Or CS(H1
~~ ~~ ~~
~-
21 .-
22 4 4 4 4 23 2 2 2 2 24 1 4 5 1 4 5 25 1 1 1 9 1 1 1 9 26 8 8 B B 21 8 8 2 2 -10 10
-219-Continudl-
1 r
j
TABLE -201131
ME I SEX WISE PlSlRlBUllON OF GENERAL SELECTEES OF CIVIL SERVICES EXAMINATION 1985 LCCORDING 10 NUMBER OF ATTEMPIS
Ape I in MRLE FEMALE ALL CLLIIDIMTES
Cimp I cted
!ears Yumber of attmpts made in CSIPl Nunbcr of atterpti udc in CSIPl Murber of attcmpts made in CSfP1 w CSIH) or CS(HI Or CSIM)
1 2 3 4 :t 1 rota1 1 2 3 4 It k Total I 2 3 4 I1 L Total r0re iorc Horr
21

22 28 1 29 15 1 -1k 41 2 -43 23 36 19 55 2 4 6 30 23 -61 24 32 48 17 91 5 14 3 -22 31 b? 20 -119 25 12 74 21 107 4 7 4 -15 16 81 25 -121 26 16 49 64 129 3 3 5 -I1 19 52 69 -140 27 2 19 38 59 1 2 2 5 3 21 (0 -64
-221-Continuedl-
n
-4
P,
AM I !XI YlSE DISTRIBVTIMOF BENERIL IN-SELECIEES 1 i.e. CAWDIDITES CALLED FW THE IYTERVlEY TEST BUI NOT FINALLY SELECTED 1 OF CIVIL SERVICES EXAHlllATlON l9E5 ACCORDIMG TO NUHDLd OF AlTElPlS
Ape in HALE     FEMALE ALL CMDIDIIES
Year on 1st Auqurt lluilnr of attempt8 made in CUP1 Nunher of attempts rrde in C51P) Nuiber of attempti made in CSIP) or CSUII or CSIII Or CS(N1
f2 3 4     tt t Iota1 1 2 3 4 1t 1 ktrl 1 2 3 4 tt b ktrl mare aore lbre
21
22 21 2 -23 7     1 20 2 -30
23 23 IS 2 -40 9 b 1 -16 32 21 3 -5L
24 34 36 10 -80 s 0 1 -I4 39 44 I1 -94
2S 11 111 31 -123 3 a 6 -17 14 m 37 -140 26 7 44 73 -I24 4 5 9 7 4a 78 -133 21 b 33 50 -n 2 1 4 *-7 0 34 LZ -104
-223-    Continuedl-


QN 
Qn  nc"-2 

Cc in HALE FEMLE ALL CMDIDATB Cinpletrd Year on 1st huqurt hribcr of attcrpts made in CSIP) Number of attnpts made in CS(PI Number of atteaptt ardc in CSlP) or CSII) or CS(H1 Or CSOI)
1 2 3 4 81 k Total 1 2 3 4 88 L Total I 2 3 4 tt L Total .. MOIC Mre lbrc
Ill 121 131 I0 IS1 161 171 1st (91 1101 1111 (121 1131 1111 11s) (Ibl
21 22 1 I 1 1 2 2 23 3 3 3 3
24 I 7 7 7 25 9 9 P P 2b -12 12 -12 12 21 1 11 12 I I1 12
-22s-Cantinucdl-

c

.-
TABLE -2Oi16)
A6E I SLI WISE DISlRlBUTIWl OF S.C. WOII-SELECTIES i.c. CANDIDATES CALLEB FOR JHE
INTERVIEW TEST BUT NOT FIYALLV SELECTED 1 Of CIVIL SERVICES EXANlNAllON 1985
ACCMIDINS TO WBER OF AIIEIIPIS

Rqe t in MALE     FEW ALL CANDIDATES
Corpletcd
Years lurber of attmpts made in CSIPI Nuiber of atteipts iadc in CSIP) Nuiher of atterpts udc in CSiP) or CSIII or CSiI!) Or CS1)O
1 2 3 4     I1 L Total 1 z 3 4 It i Total 1 2 3 4 11 I. Total tore , nore Lrr
11
22 1 I 1 1 23 1 1 b 8 1 1 1 I 7 9 11 8 8 I 1 P 9 23 7 7 2 2 9 9 26 -I4 14 I 1 -15 IS 27 1 I 9 I1 1 1 9 11
-227-    Continued/-

xw 
0… 
r – P …-

mN 

0
N

TMLE -201171
(11 (21 (31 141 (51 161 I71 181 191 1101 1111 1121 I131 1141 (151 (161
28 4 4 4 4 29 4 4 I 4 30 b b b 6
51 4 4 4 4 32 7 7 1 7 33 1 1 1 1
-.-
34 h above
–__-__
Total b 7 50 b3 I 3 4 b 8 SO 67
t Aqe pn 1st hUgU51 of thc respective year of CSMI Em.
11 Applicable only for S€ or Sl Candiditis.
-230-
TABLE -201181
ME I SEI YlSE DISTRIBUTIDW OF S.T. ION-SELECTEES 1 i.t. CANDIDATE CALLED FOR THE
INIERVIEY IESI BUT NO1 FINIKLV SELECIED 1 OF CIVIL SERVICES EIAIIINAIION 1995
ACCORDING 10 NUHDER OF AITEWTS

Ape 8 in niLE FEMALE Au ClOIDATES Coiplrted
Years lumbrr of attrrptt made in CSIPI Number of attempts ride in CS(P1 lumber of rtteipts made in CSIP) or csin) or CS(nl Or csin)
1 2 3 4     I: i Total I 2 3 4 $1 L Total. I 2 3 4 1: I Total )ore more Nore
111 (2) (31 (41 (5) 161 (71 (8) (9) (101 111) (121 113) 110 (151 (161
21
22 2 2     2 2
23 1 5 b     1 5 6
24     7 7 I 1 E 8
25 4 4     4 4
2t E E     8 8
27 8 8     a 8
-231-    Cmtinurdl-
~~~
28 9 9 1 1 -10 10 29 3 3 5 3 30 7 1 1 7 31 1 8 9 1 I 1 9 10 32 5 5 5 5 33 5 5 5 5
34 Iabove
-I-

Total 1 3 i H 13 3 3. I 5 5 bl 76
___–
t Ipe on 1st Aupuit of the respective year of CSlll Em.
I1 Rpplicable only for SC or ST Candidates. +
lAUE -2011W
ME / SEX WISE DISTRIBUTION OF GLNERAC SELECTEES OF CIVIL SERVICES EXAMINITlMl l98b
ACCORDING 10 NUMBER OF ATTEMPTS

Rge I in MALE     FEMALE ACL CMDIDITES
Complcted

Years #rh of attempts iadc in CSIP) Nuiber of atteipts made in CSIP) Number of attnpts made in CUP) or E(I) or CSOI) Or CS(MI
1 2 J 4     11 k Total 1 2 3 4 It k Total 1 2 3 4 11 b Total aorc more More
21

22 28 2 -30 9 9 37 2 -31 23 3V 35 -72 9 I1 -20 48 44 -92 24 23 61 19 -103 9 E 2 -1’1 32 49 21 -122 25 8 70 42 -120 3 7 I1 -21 I1 77 53 -141 26 4 I4 108 -I26 2 6 10 -18. 4 20 118 -144 27 5 9 40 -54 2 b 8 5 11 4b -b
-233-    Contiaurdl-

R’

N
n
c

n
m
w N

c)

TARE -201201
AGE’/ SEX WE DISIRIBUTIMI OF GENERAL HON-kLEClEES 1 i.r. CMDIDAIE ClYLEO FDR TIE
IlTERVlEY TEST BUT I01 FINALLY SELECTED 1 OF CIVIL SERVICES EI(AflIWAII0N 1986
RCCORDIWG TO NUMBER OF ATTEWTS

Ape I in MALE     FEMALE ALL CANDIDATES
Corplrted

Years Number of rttrrptr ride in CS(P1 Nurber of atterpts ride in C51Pl Nurber of attempts ride in CSIP) or CS1MJ or CSM) Or CSIM
1 2 3 4     I1 L Total 1 2 3 4 It 4 Total 1 2 3 4 II L Total rnre nore Norr
21
22 19 1 -M 11 -ii 30 1 -31 23 32 29 -61 13 E -21 45 37 -62 24 29 38 12 -79 5 8 -11 32 46 12 -90 25 10 96 34 -140 -10 b -I6 10 I06 40 -151
..
8 28 115 -131 I I1 I1 7 😮
1:;
Il*
I""
21 1 13 51 -71     4 4 1 13 61 -75
-235-    Cmtinuedl-
.Y
9
*
N
c,

.-,
PI
CD
N

..?
TA9LE -20(211
REI SEX WISE DISTRIBUTION OF S.C. SELECTEES OF CIVIL SERVICES EXAMlNAllON 1986 ACCORDIN6 TO NUMBER OF ATTEMPTS
he I in MILE FEMALE RLL CANDIDATES C&plitcd Years Number of attempts made ih CSLP) Number of atterpts made in CSIPI Number of attempts radi in CS(P) or CSIMI or CS1M) Or CSIM)
I
I 2 3 4     18 & Total I 2 3 4 11 h Total 1 2 3 4 11 & Total more more Nort
21 22 1 1 1 1 I 1 2
23. 2 3 5 I 1 3 3 b 21 1 -12 13 1 1 I -13 14 2s 1 9 10 3 3 1 -12 13 26 1 1 1 13 I6 1 I 1 I I 14 17 27 -ie ie -18 10
-237-    Continucdl-
TABLE -20121)
~~ ~~ ~
28 -12 12 2 2 -14 14,.
29 -I6 Ib -Ib 16
30 I2 I? -I? 12
31 I 15 It 1 15 I6
32 -11 Ib -I6 Ib
33 7 7 7 1
–____—__ –
Iota1 4 3 5 I30 142 2 7 9 b 3 5 137 IS1
I Age on 1st August of the respective yerr of CS(fll Eras.
tl Applicable only for SC or Sl Candidater.

TAME -20(22)
1\M I SEX YISE DlSTRl6UTlON OF S.C. KIN -SELECTEES ( i.e. CANDIDATES CALLED FOR THE
IyTERVlEM TEST Btil NOT FINALLY SELECTED 1 OF CIVIL SEKVICES EXA)IINRlIOH 1986
ACCORDING TO NUHBER OF RTTEAPTS

Ape I in HALE FEWGLE ALL CANDIDATES Completed Years Number of attempts made in CSIPI Number of attempts nde in CSIP) Number of attempts made in CSIP) or CS(M b’CS!A1 Or Cj(H1
1 2 3 4 11 L Total 1 2 3 4 18 L Total 1 2 3 4 11 & loti1 more more lore
21
21 2 2 I I 3 3
23 1 5 b 2 2 1 2 5 I:
24 8 8 I 1 9 9
25 I -10 I1 2 2 1 -12 13
26 2 iz 14 I 1 2 13 15
21 -14 14 -14 14
-239-Continuedl-

N

N,
N

.a
0 c, –
Y
Lp4
e

,
0
c

N
TdBlE -20(231
ME I SEY MIS€ OISTRIBUTION OF S.T. SELECIEES OF CIVIL SERVICES EILlllATlON 1986
LCCORDIN6 TO NUEBER OF AITlPTS

Age I in HALE     FElldLE ALL CANDIDATES
Completed

Years lumber of attempts made in CSIPI Number of attempts made in CSlPl Numbw of attempts made in CSIP) or CSMI or CSlHl Or CSllll
1 2 3 4     11 k Total 1 2 3 4 It & Total 1 2 3 4 $1 k Total more more lore
[I) (2) (31 I41 (5) (6) (71 (8) (91 110) (111 (121 1131 1141 1151 (161
21 22 4 k I I 1 4 5
23 5 5 5 5 24 6 6 I I 7 7 25 7 7 7 7 2b I 2 3 I 1 1 3 4 27 -I1 I1 -11 11
-241-    Continuedl-
d
A6E ISEX YISE OISTRIBUTION OF 5.1. NOW-SELECTEES I i.e. CMDIDATES CALLED FOR 1%
JWTERVIEY TEST BUT MOT FINALL1 SELECTED 1 OF CIVIL SERVICES EXAl(IMATI0N 1996
ACCORDING TO NUNBER OF ATTEtlPlS

Aoe I in MALE FEMALE ALL CANDIDATES C;rpleted
Years Number of attcrpts ride in CSIPI Nuiber of atteiptr iide in CSIP) Nuiber of attempts rrde in CS(P1 or CS(MI or cscn1 or CS(I11
1 2 3 4     I1 I Total 1 2 3 4 It & Total 1 2 3 4 11 L Total more more More
(11 (21 (31 (41 (51 141 171 (81 I91 (101 (111 (12) (131 1141 I151 (Ib)
21
22

23 2 I 3 b     2 1 3 6
24 4 4 4 4 25 7 7 I l E B 26 E 8 8 8 27 9 9 1 I -10 0
-243-    Continuedl-
lABLE -20(z41
28 9 9 I i -10 10 29 B E 8 B 30 I 4 J I 4 5 31 I 5 b 1 I 1 b 7 32 b b 6 6 33 b b 6 b
34 i above
Total 3 2 69 14 -.-4 4 3 2 73 70
I Aqc on 1st August of the respective !ear ol ESIHI ExaD.
I1 Applicable orily for SC or ST Candid&%-!
-241-TAME -20(25)
A6E I SEX WISE DlSTRIDUIlON OF GENERRL SELECTEES OF CIVIL SERVICES EXAtllNATlON 1987
ACCOROIWG 10 NUMBER OF AlTERlS

Aqe I in nntE FENALE ALL CANDIOITES Coipleted
Years Wurber of rtteiptr ride in CSlPl Nuiber of atteipts lade in CSIPI Wuiber of attempts iidc in CS(P) or CS(II1 or CS(RI Or CS(NI
1 2 3 4     It b Total I 2 3 4 8t b loti1 1 2 3 4 18 L Total we iore l0re
~~
21

22 25 -25 I2 -12 37     -31
2s ze 38 -6b 5 9 -I4 33 47 -80
24 42 58 23 -123 10 18 5 -33 52 76 28 -156
25 14 84 50 -140 4 13 9 -26 18 91 59 -174
26 5 23 124 -I54 I 5 15 -21 6 30 139 -175
21     1 1 1 I
-245-    Continuedl-
TRBLE -20(251
28
29
30 -.
31 2 2 2 2
32

33 34 L above
-._______ I_.-Total 114 205 199 -SIR 32 45 30 107 I46 250 229 -b25
-__I~-.—-
I Age on 1st August of the rcsp~rtiueyear of CSIil) Exaa.
11 Rpplicable only for SC or ST Candidates.

-241-
IRBLE -ZO(Z61
56E I SEI USE D1STRIBUTII)N OF GENERAL NUN-SELECTEES I i.e. CANDIDLIES CALLED FOR THE
I~ITERVIEW IEST BUi NOT FINALLY SELECiED OF CIVIL SERVICES EXAWINRTION 1987
ACCORDINS TO NUMBER OF ATTEMPTS

Age $ in MALE FEMALE ALL CAMDIDATE5 Completed Years Number of attempts made in CSIP) Numbcr of attempts made in CSIP) Number of attempts ride in CSIP) or CS(M or CS(tl1 Or CSlNl
I 2 3 4     11 & Total 1 2 3 4 :I b Total 1 2 3 4 11 4 Total more more More
21

22 31 -31 12 1 -13 43 I -44 2J 31 24 3 -58 13 7 -20 44 31 J -78 24 48 48 17 -113 6 8 1 -15 54 56 18 -128 25 21 102 44 -I67 6 10 4 -20 27 112 48 -187 26 7 32 157 -196 5 4 13 -22 12 36 170 -210
27

-247-    Continurdl-
IABLE -201261
28 29 1 I i 1 30 ? 2 2 2
31

32
53 34 k above
Total 138 208 222 -5611 12 SO lB -70 mo 230 ?40 -658
-_
1 Age on 1st August of the respectlug year of CSINI Exam.
11 Applicable only for SC or Sl Candidates.

IABLE -20(271
ME.I SEI MIS€ DISlRIBUTIMl Of S.C. SELECTEES OF CIVIL SERVICES EIMINAIION 1987
KCORDING 10 WNBER OF AIIEWIS

Aqe 8 in HALE FElRLE ALL cAnoinnm CMpI eted
Yam
‘Yurbcr of rtterpts lade in CS(P1 Noiber of rtterpts ride in CS1PI Nluber of rttmpta ride in CS(P1 or CS(M or CS(h1 Or CSIHI
I 2 3 4     It b Total I 2 3 4 It k Total I 2 3 4 11 k Total more rorc lore
(I1 (21 (3) (41 (51 I61 171 (81 (9) (101 111) (121 (131 (141 (131 116)
21 22 1 2 3 1 2 3 23 1 3 6 I I ‘; I b 7 24 2 b 8 1 1 2 7 9 2s 1 1 2 B 12 I I 1 1 3 8 13 2b -16 10 I 1 -11 11 27 3 I4 17 I 1 3 15 18
-249-    Continurdl-
TRBLE -20(271
28 -17 17 3 3 -20 20 29 -15 I5 -15 15 30 -Ih I6 -I6 !b 51 I I6 17 I I 1 -17 IB
~
32
33

31 i above
Total 3 4 12 10: 121 2 7 9 3 4 14 109 i30
I Age on 1st August of the rerpectivc year of CSIN) Exae
11 Applicable only lor 5C or Sl Candidates.

TABLE -20(281
A6E / SEX YlSE DISTRIBUTlON OF S.C. ION-SELECTEES I i.e. CANDIDATES CALLED FOR THE
INTERVIEW IEST BUT NOT SELECTED I OF ClVlL SERVICES EXllBINATlOli 1987
ACCORDIWG TO NUMBER OF ATlEMPiS

Age I in MALE FEMLE ALL CANDIDATES Completed Years Wumbq of attempts made in CS(P1 Number of attempts rade in CSiPl Number of attempts made in CS(P1 ur ES(M1 or CSIW) Or CS(M)
1 2 3 4     tt & Total 1 2 3 4 I1 I Total I 2 3 4 11 b Total more lore More
22 I I     2 2 2 1 3 4
23 5 5     5 5
24 I 1 11 13     3 3 I 1 14 lb
25 1 -11 12     2 2 1 -13 14
Zb I 18 19     2 2 I 20 21
21 -17 17     -17 I7
-251-    Continurdl-
TABLE -ZO(28)
(11 (21 131 14) (51 1b) (71 (81 (91 1101 111) 112) (131 1141 1131 (161
28 I -14 13 1 -I4 15 29 -22 22 -22 22 30 -32 32 I 1 -33 33 31 -20 20 -10 20 32
33 I 1 1 1 31 L above
lotal 1 4 7 I46 158 -. 1 B 10 1 6 7 54 168
I ape on 1st August of the respective year al CSM1 Errm.
Ft Applicable only for SC or ST Candidates.

TABLE -20(29)
A6E I SEX WISE DISTRIBUTION OF S.T. SELEflEES OF CIVIL SERVICES EXMINIITION 1987
hCCORDIN6 10 MBER OF llllEllPTS

Age I in HALE FEMALE ALL CANDIDATES CompIeted Vrrrr lumber of rttempts made in CS1P) Number of attempts made in CS(P1 Number of attempts made in CS(P1 or CS(M or CSM) Or CS1H)
I 2 3 4     It & Total I 2 3 4 It L Total 1 2 3 k It L Total 1orr nore More
(11 8 (21 (3) (4) (51 (b) (71 IS) 19) (10) 111) (12) 113) 111) 1131 (161
21
22 I I     1 1
23 I 1 3 5 1 1 3 5 2k 9 9 9 9
25 4 I 1 I 5 5 26 -I1 11 I I -12 12 21 k 4 1 1 5 t
-253-    Continuedl-
-I
ws
c

-P -m -c 
I  ,  ,  ,  ,  ,  , 

* zrn 

AM I SEX Ylt DISTRIBUTION W 5.1. NWI-SELECTEES I i.e. CANDIMTES CALLED FOR THE
INTERVIEW TEST BUT NOT SELECTED ) OF CIVIL SERVICES EXllNlNlTION 1987
ACCORDIN6 TO NUMBER OF ATTEMPTS

Age I in MLE FENALE ALL CANDIDATES Corpleted Years Wurbrr of atterpts ride in CS(P1 Nurber of atterptr ride in CSIPI Nurber of atterpts made in CSIP) or CS") or CS(I1 Or CSIN)
1 2 3 I     tt I Total 1 2 3 4 11 I Total 1 2 s I It L Total rare inre lorr
~ ~~
21
12 2 2     2 2
23 4 4     4 4
24 I 1 5 7     1 1 I I b a
25 1 7 8     2 2 I 9 10
26 -I2 12     I 1 -13 IS
17 9 9     9 P
-255-    Continucdl-

18 ZL 0 2 I 9 9 SL 97 9 I I lQIOl
IOSIOZ-mwi
Rtttptlrear  1984 6sn. ST SC Total  1%3 Een SI SC Totdl  1986 6tn ST SC Total  1987 HI. ST SC Total 
2  34  5  67  a  9  10  11 12 15  14  15 16 17 
-.-
Flrst  176 2  4 102  I5b  — I56  140  – 5  145  I46 1  5  150 
*on$  221 1  – 222  249 2  – 251  230  – 2 232  ?50  1  2  253 
Third  2m  1  2 214  185 1  2  180  259 2 2 263  228  – B  23b 
fourth  -I  6  7  -1  – 1  –I  1  -2  4  b 
Fifth  — 2  2  -1  1  2  – 1  1  2  -1  – 1 
Sixth  -2  – 2  — 2  2  .- -2  2  — – –
Ibt  7  63 113 183  7 62 122 190  2 71 158 211  I  57  113 171 
Availablt 
Total  b14 71 129 814  597 bl  126 790  631 71 151 856  630 62 130 817 
-257 –

TABLE -22
DISTRIBUTION OF TOP 28:)O MERIT RANK HOLDERS OF CIVIL SERVICES EXAMINATIONS, 1984 TO 1987 ( ACCORDING TO NUMBER OF ATTEMPTS )
_–
No. of C-indidates
Number of __ At.tempt 1984 1985 1986 1987
1 5 4 :3
First 62 41 52 49
Second 79 89 82 78
Third 50 68 65 68
Number of 9 2 .1 5
attempts
not k.nown

ECOC 5tC
Elf
10) ZOZ 681 w
821
01
ItCSI
O9LZ
f192
11ot
0bfZ OAK IESP KC61
h
OOOK

81s
f91
1K
501
tll blb 911
8
ISPET t06Z blC1 tttt CbZE
tPC1
Lt69 9oEl
1
fOBZ 81) I92
IEC
151
L81
t98 t11
P

-6SL-

lUPl
LCbf
lC2t

Pelf
OlEZ
9Llf
1tC1
LCtl
e
2161
ett
COf
EtT

8C1 tat iie OCI
t
btL91
SCKt

CbCL
CttC 1111 C601 Ot99 6901
r
OOBL 6s
m
96Z
011
t1z WE tt1
2 1
I 2 3 k 5 6 78 9 10
Dispur 707 95 622 92 687 80 704 86 686 83 Hyderabd 5141 775 3956 800 5984 750 4631 hlb 5213 698 Jaipur 5818 9Zb 6929 800 5055 163 5k00 776 5793 711 Madras 3351 356 4476 299 3777 27) 3826 255 3617 256 Wagpur 1231 96 1270 76 ll9b 88 1537 71 lbS2 91 Patni 7321 710 0171 821 7998 15k 6398 766 7171 799 Shillonq k15 ei) 341 60 319 36 335 k7 263 11 Shill* 968 124 060 119 863 102 679 101 595 75 Sriniprr 2k7 I1 332 16 349 10 (12 13 333 6 Trivrndrui 9kS 99 1016 97 1293 LOO I018 67 967 70 Cothin 788 91 938 82 1169 15 963 82 918 90 Lucknw 5203 572 5501 626 5687 569 5Lkl 581 5083 56k JIDDU 351 33 574 35 663 30 26 195 30
4Y

Chandigrrh 4652 670 k2Y3 606 4147 523 31’12 470 3531 k87 Panrji 105 10 123 15 1k9 I1 78 9 132 10
Port Blair Rurrnqrbrd Dharnrr Nadurai Ranchi Kohima Lngtot
lmpkl hqartalr Jorhrt ninl ltrnrgrr Raipur Tirupati
I
Uizrqr-prttanrm Waipur
I9
691

785 1588 1966 168
300
109
245
114

.50.
998
lm4

1754
0
24
49
86
199

27
4b

16
15
22

3
47
57
203

I8
717

90b
1859

2081
180
312
81

139
104
43
1015
I063
1838

784
0
17
44

LB
I65
28

50

9
8
20
6
44

b6
203
48

25
631
891
1548
2146
211

363

98
19b
125

65
I104
1148
1895
697

-260 A-
I
25

49
51
141
22

48
7

14 24
1
49
60
182

bO
I8
715

587

It195
1614
174

384
72

252

91

65
1126

883
1463
6S2

I
39
26

58
148
25

45
b
19

I8 3
51
56
178
61

14
768
589
1850
1740
133
80
32b
8b
176
I21

61
1085
861
I540
601

1
21
36

49
141

7
18
43
S
17

15
4
70

13
199
51

TABLE -23(8) CENTRE-WISE NUMBER W CANDIDATES APPEARED AllD RECOHIIENMD DURIWG 1984 TO 1987 ClVbSERVlCfS ( WAIN J EKlHlllATlOY
1984 l9ES lP8b 1987 Ctntrt Ippcarod Rocoirended Appeared Recoatended Appeared Reconfimded Appeared Rrcwrnded
Ahredabad 125 I2 107 I4 87 10 105 10 llllahabad 822 44 807 42 813 39 907 44 ~&npalore 237 Ib 234 17 214 17 168 10 Bhopal 192 17 197 18 202 17 231 19 Boabay 268 19 303 27 322 31 358 25 Calcutta 293 22 256 I7 246 24 228 21 Cuttack 513 41 460 21 409 22 360 21 Llhi 2604 290 2647 306 2657 34b 2807 343 Dirpur I in 9 127 11 I14 U 123 15 Hyderabad 870 58 914 75 832 77 7Ti 83 Jaipur 601 55 129 52 72L 41 bOY 4b
-261 -Cont inuedl-
kdrar
Patna

shiI long Skimla
Trivandrui
Luctnon

a-
Chandlqarh

Total
35s
847

1W
94

173
548

36
577

9582
18 41
8
13
14
60
4
75

814

334
858

100
9b
157
564
4b
526

9482

21
38

9
5 10 58
4
47

790

-262 –
292
746

as 81
141
560
33
4bl

9327 29 51
I1
10
15

47

3

32

8Jb
212 29
832 42
56 7

15 1
I21 11 560 31 33 3 450 42
9103 817

TOP TEN UNIVERSITIES ( IICCORDIIG TO NUHBER OUALIFIED 1 IN THE (AS EIC. EXANINATION 1974 TO 1978
1974 1975 1976 1977 1978

1.    
Delhi University 1. Delhi University 1. Delhi University 1. Delhi University 1. Belhi University (1211 11291 (127) (1531 (1371

2.
Punjab University 1. Punjab University 2. Allahabad University2. Rllahabad University 2. Punjab University 1581 (761 1521 (631 (b81

3.    
dllahabad UniversityS. Rllahabad University3. Punjab Univerrity 3. Punjab University 3. Madras University (451 (501 (51) 1491 (42)

4.
Calcutta University 4. Hidrar University 4. Nadras University 1. Nadras University 4. Allahabad University (391 (371 136) 142) 1411

5.
Rijasthan Univrrsity5. Lucknon University 5. Calcutta University 5. Calcutta University 5. Patna University

(281     (121 1501 1361
6.     Madras University 6. Patna University 6. Utkal University 6. Patna University 6. Calcutta University 1251 and (251 and and (261 4 Ill! Calcutta Krrala University Calcutta Univrrsity Kerala University 1331 (251 1251 (27)
-?b3-    Cant inuedl-
TABLE -24141
1974 1975 1976 1977 1978

7. Gunhati University 7. Rrjasthan University7. Lucknor University ?.-Lucinor llnirersity 7. JWU, Dclhi
(241 1221 1251 (231 (251

8.     Ill’s 8. Yerrlr Univrrsity 8. Rdjisthdn University8. Utkrl University 8. Rajisthan University (221 1201 1211 (201 1231 L Uttrl University Bhdraneshwar
(2s)
‘ 9. Prtnr University 9. Aprc University P. Patnd University 9. Rijasthan University 9. Keralr University (151 (211 1151 1191 llS1 Trivandrui
10. Rrerut University 10. Utkal University 10. Hadris University 10. Krrilr University 10. hndhra University
(161 and 1131 (141 and
Lucknor University 1161 111 Krnpur 1141 1141
1161

Note : Fi~ursi in brackets indicate the nurbrr of candidates rho
wre in the merit list of IRS etc. exriination.

-164-

1982 I983 1984 1985 I986 1987
VIII.     Andhra Univ. (22)VIII. 111. Kanpur VIII. Lucknow Univ. Vlll. DHU (231 VlII. Hrdris Univ. VIII. Patna Univ.
,d 1241 (231 & rstna & I11 Kanpur (23) 12bl (211
Lucknow Univ.(221 Univ. 123)

IX.     Guru Imak 11. Guru Nsnak 111. Kurukshetra Univ. IX. Osranis Uni. IX. Plndhrs Liv. 11. Lucknow Univ. Dev. Univ. Dev. Univ. (221 L 122l 121) (20) & 111
(21)     (231 k Patnr Guru Naark Kanpur (20) Univ. 1231 Mv. Univ. 1221 & Osnanii Univ.
(20)

X.     Calcutta Unlv (191 11. 111, Delhi I221 1. Hsdras Univ. X. Patna Univ. X. CHU 1191 1. Hadrar Univ.
& Kurukihetra (191 1211 (19)
.Univ. (191

Note:     Fiqurcr in bractctr indicate the nunber of the candidates, nho were in the writ list of the Civil Services Exanination.
-266-
TW -25
YUIWR of CMDIMTES
WPEARED, OLMLIFIED nno THEIR SUCCESS MTIOni THE CIVIL SERVICES E~MI~~AIIOIIS 10 LWRGE
1982 TO 19w KCORDIM IEDIMI ns IYTERMTIVE
tmnFOR IUIWRIIIG
GENEMIL STUDIESMDOPIIOIIAL PAPERS.
1.  English  7376  872  1:6.46  7782  769 I:lO.lZ  7932 731  1:10.65  7952  715 I:ll.lZ  7384 768 119.61 
2.  Rrsamnr  3  1  1:3.00  4  2  1  I: 2.00  3  – – 2  – –
3.  Bengali  7  – 10  1 1:lO.W  7  1  I: 7.00  9  I  I: 9.00  a  – –
4.  Gujarati  26  2  1:13.W  30  2  1:15.00  30  4  11 7.50  19  I  1119.00  15  7 112.14 
5.  Hindi  1168  75  1:15.57 1371  57 1:24.04  1413 61  1:ZS.bI  1327  59 1122.47  1440 b2 1:23.23 
6.  Waanada  4  2  1: 2.00  I1  – – b  1  11 6.00  5  3  1: 1.67  I  – –
7.  Karkiri  – – – – – – – – – – – –
8.  Ilalryalaa  2  I  11 2.00  3  – – 2  – 3  – – 3  – –
9.  brathi  15  1  1:15.00  22  2  1:11.00  22  3  1: 7.35  18  I  1116,OO  16  3 115.33 

-2b7 -Continuedl-
1Y. … iiriya I 5 * .. —–
11. Punjrbi 20 2 l:10.00 13 5 1: 2.60 27 2 I:I3.50 28 I m.00
12. Sanskrit —–1-1 1 1: 1.00
13. Sindhi IDrvI —–1—
14. Sindi (Arab.) –
15. Tamil 13 3 I: 4.33 13 2 I: 6.50 19 I 1:lV.OO 10 I 1:lU.M)
16. Telug~ 43 4 1:10.75 91 6 1:15.17 117 9 lr13.00 lob 7 1tlS.14
17. Urdu 2 –3 I 1: 3.04 5-1 —
I_
Total 8681 943 1: 9.02 9354 845 1:11.07 9500 814 1:11.77 9483 790 1:12.00 9028 855 1:lO.S
TCIBLE-26

PERFORMANCE OF CIVIL SERVICES SELECTEES, WHO GOT SELECTED IN FIRST ATTEMPT, IN GENERAL STUDIES AND OP’TIONAL PAPERS OF CS (M) EXAMINATION 1984 TO 1986.
________________________________________———————————————————–
General Year of Optional subjects marks interval (Maw :1200) Studies C6 (M) Totr1 marks Exam. Less than or equal to 40% 40%- 50% 50%-60% 60%-70% More than
( 0-480 ) ( 481-600) (600-7200) (721-840) 70% (More than 84%)

01N I I I I W I JI  .4 a +I 0 I- 9  d  9 h ..I  d ..I  0d d  9d d 
@ I I-I I I I ai  c c a:mJz 84 Y  1  I  I  I  4  I 
I I I I I  Y-a:: IS I> 00 E0”gm 
t 1 I  I  I  d  r)  9  N ..I 

U-J  rl  m N 4  9 0 4  n m  P 4 d 

0. 9 N 

r(  1  0P  I\ 0  mP  C. N 




4J 
I  I  I  I  I  I  I 







f ei o-I x. I LYE I6 I alvls I >uw  b 0. m 4  b Lp m ..I  d m s  In m2  9 0. m 4  b Lp m rl 

I1r.e 
I  mm  c( m cl 

I984 1985 1986 1967

ZONE     NO. NO. SUCCESS NO. NO. SUCCESS NO. YO. SUCCESS NO. 1. SUCCESS Ilppe-Ouali-Ratio Appe-hall-Ratio Appc-Puali Ratio Appe-Pull-Ratio ared fied ared fled ared fied arm4 fled
1. North 5747 576 1:9.98 5629 546 1:10.31 5742 566 1:10.14 6054 549 1:11.02
(60.1) (70.91 159.11 (69.41 (63.61 (66.S1 (66.5) 167.41

2. South 1629 97 I:lb.BO lb52 Ilb 1:14.24 1623 152 I:lO.b8 1436 145 1:09.90
(17.0) (11.91 (17.4) (14.71 (18.01 117.8) 115.8) (17.8)
3. East 1664 I08 I:17.26 l8bl 94 1:19.60 1333 101 1:13.20 1217 62 1:14.84
(19.51 (13.31 (19.71 (11.91 (14.81 111.81 113.41 (10.11
4. Yest 328 33 1:10.58 326 34 1:10.40 324 35 1109.26 390 38 l:r0.26
(3.41 (3.91 (3.51 (4.01 103.61 (04.11 (04.3) (04.71
Total 9568 814 9468 790 9022 854 9097 811
(100.0) 1100.01 (100.01 Lloo.01 (100.0) 1100.01 (100.01 (100.01
Note I 1. 4     lone has been deteriinod as per location of the University #her# successful
candidates studied

2. Fiqurer within brackets indicate tape to total
-270
TABLE -27W 10#-Y16E I NUHDER OF CRDIDATE0 YYEAREb,OUIILIFIED All0 BUCCESS RAllO FOR CIVIL SERVICES EXLNldtilIOYS, 1084 TO 1907
1934 1985 1’kh 1987
_.__–. __.–.–l________._.l__
ION€     NO. NO. SUCCESS NO. NO. SUCCESE kO. NO. SUCCESS NO. NO. SUCCESS Appe-Puali-Ratio Appe-auali-Ritio nope-Budli Ratio Appe-Ouli-Ratio ared fied ired fied ared fied ared tied
–1_1-
1. North     5614 55b 1:10.2 5612 530 1:10.6 5533 555 1:lO.O 5752 543 1:lO.b
(59.2) (68.51 (59.2) lb7.1) 161.3) (64.8) (63.0) (66.51
2. South,     1635 I06 lr15.4 1639 123 1:1?3 ,1485 138 1110.0 1289 133, 1t9.7
117.11 (13.0) (17.31 (15.61 (16.51 (16.1) (14.1) (16.3)
3. East     1880 121 1115.5 lsZl 96 1rlP.O 1609 122 1:lS.l 1b19 106 1:15.3
(19.6) 114.9) (19.21 (12.1) (17.7) (14.3) (17.81 (13.01
4.     Yest 393 31 1:12.7 410 41 lrlO.O 409 41 1:lO.O 463 35 1113.2 14.1) 13.8) (4.3) (5.2) (4.5) (4.8) 15.1) (4.21
Total 9582 814 9402 790 9027 056 91.23 817 1100.0) (100.01 (100.0) (100.0) (100.01(100.0) (100.0) (100.01
Note :1. 1 1me has been deterrlncd a5 per location of UPSC centres for the Civil Services Iltairi) Exarinat.ion
2. Fiqurcs within brackets indicate the percentage to the total candidates.
-271-
-272 –
IN MFFEHUI lPACKElS OF hER11 RAW:, NUIIBEI ci hurb, B.E. 011 B,MfH. CRiiiiGdiES CE:;I:ID IN THE CJVJl SERVICES EI~~JH~~I~s, 1984 10 1986
lPB4 I~BJ l’dA
RANKS
IBBS B.E. LESS B.E. NBES E.E.

1 -loo 33 6 I4 2 ?I 101 -230 22 5 21 4 la 201 -so0 17 s 24 2 24 301 -400 I3 3 It 3 18 401 -500 13 3 15 3 51 501 -600 13 b 29 b 22 bO1 -700 19 4 12 6 18 701 -800 9 4 5 b 801 -900 I 2
W0IE:l. 8.1, includes I B.k. (Enqp.1 I B.E. ,B.E. (Honrl, b.lech, H.Teth, DIP. in Enpq.
1. I.S.E.S. includes I Brcllelor in Vet.Sci., I.B.E.S. b E.I.L.6. (Iedicinel
-113 –
TABLE -30
PERFORMANCE OF ENGINEERS AND DOCTORS I GENERAL SELECTEES ) IN GENERRL STUDIES AND OPTloIuL SUBJECTS OF CIVIL SERVICES 1 NblN ) EXANIYATIONS, 1984 TO 1987.
Acadeaic Year of No. a1 General Studies nark5 Ilagel Optiondl SIIbJCCtS auks iIagel
I Cs ,111 Candidates ……………………………………………………… Discipline Em. Range of Marts Average Range of Narks Average
_–_-___-__-_-__—
Niniiua Haxiiui Marks Mininui Haxiiui Mart5

11) 12) IS) 14) I51 Ib) 171 181 19)
1984 Ilb 40 b2 58 .44 63 53 1985 110 37 58 49 43 b4 53
1.    
Engineering 1986 I44 J8 bl 49 41 70 52 1987 151 54 b5 52 4k 65 54

1984 23 44 68 51 43 61 51 1985 17 41 58 52 4b 62 52

2.    
Hrdical 19% 18 23 37 49 4b 58 51 1987 25 47 b4 54 46 66 51

-214 -    Con tinuedl-
-srz –
ff 99 El ZE 11 Ot 529 Lf41 ZE 01 It 8t LI ez is9 9BbI EE 09 tt 6t OP It LLE fB6l lWl ZE tP tt Lt 89 EC ttf) t86l
TMLE -U(A)
PLACE IF BlRTHlRESIOEMCE OF ALL FlMlLLV SELECTED CANDIDATES (SELECTEES) AND CAIIOIOATES CALLED FOR THE IWTERVIEW TEST BUT Yo1 FINALLY KLECIED ("I-SELECTEES) of CIVIL SERVICES EIMINATIW 1984.
——-_—-_-_-_-__————————————————..——————————————–
Selsc tees/ Place of Birth Location of School Place of residence after Higher
Placer (Major tire spent) Secondary Em. (Major tire sgnt)
Ln-Selectees No. (lapel No. (lage) No. Ilage)

111     12) 13) (4) (5)
Selectees 152 (18.7) 220 (27.11 354 (43.51
1.     Cities
Ym-selectees 123 (14.21 162 (18.7) 290 (33.41

Selectees 332 I4031 382 I4b.9) 393 (48.3)
2. Toms
Yon-selectees 313 (36.1) 426 149.11 490 (56.5)
Selectees 330 (40.5) 212 (26.0) bl 18.2)
3.     Villaper
Yon-selectees 432 149.7) 280 (32.2) 88 (10.1)

Selectees 814 (100.01 814 (100.01 814 (100.0)
Total
Wan-selectees 8I8 (100.01 868 1100.01 Bb8 (100.01

………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Noti :1. Cities :-    Boabay, Calcutta, lhlhi, Iladras, Ahredabad, Banglore, Chdigarh, Hydertbad, Jaipur, Luckna, Patna and Pune.
2.    
Toms :-All the towns as per 1981 census lid!., All rtiturtory towns i.e., all placer with a lluniclpal Corporation, llunicipal Board, Cantonrrnt board or Notified tom area etc. J

3.
Villages     :-Other thin Cities and tom) as defined above.

-276 –
Seloctees 361 (45.71 371 Ilb.91 33s (42.4)
2. Tws
Won-selectees 343 (41.41 409 I4P.4) 371 144.7)
lotal
Yon-splectees 829 IIML.0) m 1100.01 629 (100.01

MI 1. Cities :-    Borbay, Calcutta, Dalhi, Madras, Ahredabad, Banglore, Chandiqark, Hydorabad, Jaipur, Lucknw, Patna and Pune.
2.     Toms I-All the towns a5 per 1981 census (i.e., A11 itatuatory tarns ia., a11 places with a Municipal Corporation, Lnicipal Bard, Cantonrnnt Board or Notified torn area mtc.)
5. VillagCs :-Other than Cities and tornr as defined above.
-211 –
TSLE -SI(C)
PLACE OF BlRTHlRESIDEYCE OF RLL FIMLLV SELECTED CAWDIDATES (SELECTECSI RliD CANDIDATES CALLED FOR THE IITERVIEY TEST Bur MOT FINALLY SELECTEB ~YOY-LLECTEESI OF CIVIL SERVICES EIaninniion 1986
Se1RCtLd Place of Birth Location of Schwl Place of midenre after Hiqher Placer (lajor tirc spent) Secondary Exam. (Najor tilp rpmt) Non-Sclectter Yo. (Zagel NO. (IlgR) No. (ZWpI
Selec toes 272 (31.81 284 (33.21 195 (22.81
2.     Joms h-selectees 226 (25.61 274 131.01 224 (25.41
Selcc tees 312 (SC.4) 202 125.6) bO (7.0)
3.     Villrqis lon-relectier 390 144.21 266 (30.1) 81 0.9 I
4. Not Reported Mon-celrteer 3 10.51 3 (0.31
Note I Thi classilication ot village, twn and city has bRen done by the candidates therselvec
Tam -silo)
PUICE OF BIRTHIRZSIDENCE OF ALL FINALLY SELECTED CLWOIDIIIES (SLLECIEES) MD CAllOIDAlfS CALLED FOR I# IYIERVIEY TEST WT NO1 FINALLY SELECTED INN-SELECIEESI OF CIVIL SERVICES EY141YIIIIOI 1961
Selectees! Place Df Birth Loratinn of Srhool Plm of rciidence after HipherPlacer (flaw liai sptnt) Secendrry Exru. (Hdisr Ira$ speuIl Ion-Srlec twr NO. izagei No. (lag?) No. Ilaqc)
I11 (2) 131 14) 15)
SelLctOrs 30b (37.5) JOY (47.61 625 (76.5)
1. Citior Won-selertees 28@ (31.8) 375 (41.2) 641 17o.a)
Selcctees 261 131.9) 266 1’12.6) 153 (lE.71
2. lorns
Won-selwtees 212 126.7) 503 133.5) 216 123.9)
Yote I The rlrrtitiotion ot villagr, twa and city has been done by the candidates theiselver
-219 –
TABLE  -32 
I.  SCHOOL BACEGKOUND CIF CIVIL SERVICES SELECTEES FOR  THE PERIOD 1984 TO 1987 
Year  Pub1ic School  Missionary School  Other Schools (Govt., Corp., Central etc.)  Total 
1984  137 * (16.8)  677 (83.20  814 
1985  a7 (11.13)  156 (19.7)  540 (69.3)  790 
1986  83 (Y.7)  19h (22.9)  577 (67.4)  856 
1987  102 (12.5)  104 (22.5)  531 (65.0)  817 

Continuedy-

TABLE -32
I.I MEDIUM OF INSTRLJCTION AT SCHOOL (IF CIVIL SERVICES EXAMINATION
Year Eng11sh Hindi Fieqiona1 LanqLIage
1984 43% 36% 21%

1985 -59% Wl% 21%
1986 4;7. 5b.L 20%
-_.
1987 49% siL 18%
-_-
Note I 1 t Includes Missionary School
2. Figures within brackets indicate percentage to the total number of selected candidates
TAME -n(r)
PERFOWWICE OF SNCTEEB IN BOERK STUDIESL DpllDwL WOJECTS OF CIVIL YRVlCES EIMlMTlMl I984
Agriculture Botany 3 Cheiistry
.Civil Engineering -Courrce k lkcwtancy I 2 Economics 0 Electrical Enqg. -I Sroqraphy 1
Eeology
History 2 24 LW 5 Hanapelent & Public -3
Miinistration Ratheratits 1 2 hchanical Enqq. -1 Philosophy 1 Pbysics I Political Science L -5 Intrrnatlonal Relation- Plycholoqy 1 6 SDCiolqy 8 Zooloqy I Statitici I hiul Husbandry L -Veterinary Science Rnthropolopy I
-1 9 I1 3 2 26
4 I1 15 0 1 42
4 3 4 5 5 21 1 4 8 11 10 2 36 5 7 10 0 3 36
Ib lb 2b I4 7 1 90 I 7 I1 10 9 1 40 17 I5 20 13 1 2 70 3 4 7 4 4 22 59 63 56 26 7 1 242 10 22 26 If b I 02 8 I6 25 13 0 I 74
5 7 4 I I 2 25 3 5 7 3 4 I 21 2 0 14 8 3 1 38 4 b 13 17 I1 4 ss 20 52 50 32 14 4 185
15 26 41 16 9 11s 15 38 54 41 5 lb2
4 13 I6 8 7 2 51 I 3 3 4 I2 3 3 b
5 b 12 7 4 1 30
282 -Continuedl-
ro
W
N
N
t8t –
S r 1 1 I1 S S L I 09 e 6 It ir E S OS2 Zl I9 2L 19 t1 e ElI L 12 zt 61 )I 2
1cz 12 09 te ‘tb er tE e 91 tI L t 1 Lt L 21 6 L t 1 El 1 c 1 t E 1 22 S z 9 t S
IS S r1 e S 5 I 26 e 61 LS I2 S Sb2 c It 1L 96 fS 02 (1 S If t T 29 5 er It I1 E 1 LI 2 9 2 E so1 n 1t El e c 12 L 2 21 t r r 92 L 9 9 r 2 01 9 9 I 2 99 f 22 SZ ZT t 61 1 t 1 C 2
ri 01 6 e L 9 E t S z

IAU -S3(CI PERFORHAKE OF SELECTEES IN GENERAL STUDIES L OPTIONAL SUBJECTS OF CIVIL SERVICES EYAHIIIATION 1985
1 2 3 4 5 b 7 8 9 10 11
Agricul ture 4 b 8 1 19 Botany 2 2 1 11 9 7 2 40 Cbemirtry 3 1 5 4 5 18 Civil Engineering -2 3 4 8 I1 E 5 41 Commerce L Accoutancy -3 2 4 4 3 k 20 Economics b 17 18 18 10 71 Electrical €1199. -1 3 3 4 b 7 3 28 Geography 4 5 18 19 b 9 2 b3 Gcology 1 4 8 5 18 Hi~tory 10 41 93 104 3k 14 299 Law 4 1 8 3 7 b 36 Hanagennt L Public -4 17 17 7 45 Adiinistration flathematics 1 3 b 10 11 b I 38 kchanical Engg. 1 3 5 7 7 4 1 28 Philosophy 3 8 b 13 5 1 I 37 Phyricr 1 9 12 lb 15 12 6 71 Political Science L 1 3 14 25 45 29 26 a 2 153 International Relation Psychplqy 1 2 2 14 22 36 32 16 4 129 SKiolOpy b 33 47 41 29 13 4 173 zoology 4 117 10 16 9 7 57 Statitics 1 2 5 1 3 12
-286 -Cont inuedl-
0h I)N 
5:  a-I) 
a-

I
n

N
Botany Chistry Civil Engineering -CDucrce & Accwtancy 2 Econo#ics I Electrical Enpq. -6eoqraphy
hl09yHistory 1 Lam knaqcwnt I Public -Addnirtrrtim ktheiatici khanical Engp. -Philosophy Physics I Political Science L 2 IntirnatiMal Relation Piycholoqy 1 Socioloqy looloqy 1 Statitlcr
1 1
2 10
1 1 4
1 1
10
2 9 1
b 8 1 3 4 b b 19 22 3 6 2 I6 2 40 74 6 18 4 9
3 2 1 1 5 13 3 12 2h 48
b 22 31 55 7 15 1
-288 –
16
b
11 12 23 10 17 1 116 15 17
11 3 9 14 48
30
b0
17
6

10 8 9 3 3 9 12 b 65 11
3
13
3
14 15 17
28 37 10
I
8 6 0
I
4
I
2 4 16 5 2
b 1 4 8 8
7
12 5 2
4 5 1
1
1 1
5
3 4
I
3
Continusdl-
57 29 37 36 82 35 51 21 316 55 35
42
P

49
58
159
101 215
56
13
n
N

lllE -SS(LI
PERFORMICE 19nb

OF SEIECIEES IN BENERAL SIUDIES L OPiionnL PAPERS OF CIVIL SERVICESE~AHI~~AIIM~
No. of Candidates with rarks interval
Subjects ………………………………………………………………………………………… Less than 201-225 226-250 251-275 276-300 301-325 326-350 351-375 Hore than Iota1 201 375
1 1 3 4 5 b 7 8 9 10 11
Apricul ture b 9 I1 9 1 36 Botany I 5 b b I1 1 4 3 43 Cheristry I 3 I 1 I. -10 Civil Enqineerinq -3 I1 9 7 5 3 40 Corrertr & Accoutancy I 1 1 5 3 10 b I 2 30 Econoaics 2 10 18 34 27 9 5 10s Electrical Engq. 1 2 3 b I1 12 3 6 6 50 6rography 1 2 4 12 25 16 b 1 b7 6Rolopy 1 3 8 I I 15 History I 7 37 78 I16 bO 21 2 322 Law b E 10 8 2 1 35 Mmqnent & Public -I 4 8 19 17 E 1 1 59 Adrinistrstion flatheratits 1 4 b B 4 1 2 29 Mechanical Engq. 2 I I 3 11 4 9 3 36 Philosophy I 4 3 B 13 2 1 32 Pbyiics I 1 7 17 ie 14 17 I4 89 Political Science k 1 3 25 40 48 18 5 2 112 International Relation Prycholoqy 1 5 18 24 31 17 I1 107 SOciolDpy 10 30 b4 b4 27 7 1 201 loolnqy 1 3 3 10 9 9 9 b so Statitics I 3 I 5
-290 -Continuedl-
0.
t

Q
N
n
c)I I :1i I

R

,
c1

1

Q
IRBLE -33(F)
PERF-M W-SELECTEES 11.e.~ CWlDlMlES CMLED FOll THE lNlERYlEY IESl BUi NOT FIWLI KLECIED 1 IN MIERAL SIUMES 1WllDWAC PAPERS OF CIVIL ERVICES EYllYllOll OF 1986
1 2

Aqrirul ture 1 Botany Chairtry Civil Enginerring 2 Corrce L Ikcoutanncy 1 ECMMiCS I Elrtricil .En99. –
&@why 1 GrOlrrpY
History
Lar
Hanrqerent b Public –
Moinirtrition Hatheraticr kcknlcal Enpg, -Phi Irropby Physic# 1 Political kirnncr L b lntnnitlmil Rrlatim
r8yCbolqy ‘2 Sociolrrpy 1 lWW I
StatiStici
3  4 
1  1 
4  5 
2  4 
2  2 
2  I2 

14 

7  14 
2  I1 


b  4 

13  53 
3  12 
11  19 
3  4 

5

e
I8
5
8
4
27
5
19
2

86
12
7

b
1
I6
8 71
17
79
14
6  1  8  9  10  I1 
13 19 5 10 lb 26 4 15 8 I18 I1 9  9 16 3 8 b 10 5 19 5 99 IS 3  4 3 1 S I 6 1 34 J 2  I 1 1 I 1 I 6 1  1 1  UI bb 14 36 32 81 21 75 21 374 56 14 
4 6 15 I6 42  7 3 7 11 S  3 1 12 1  4  21 10 49 bl 169 
19 78 22 1  17 36 9 7  3 b 7  I I 2 2  84 251 b? 11 

-192 –
IN nN
9

N
P
UJ
P
d

r,
rr

d

m
4
P
Kl
n
P
0

m
ct

U,
4
Ul
UI
U,
n
X-I
d

9
9

m
rr

rl
RPPENDICEB

-295-
APPENDIX -I
No.F.ZZ/l6/85-E.I(P) UNION PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION
DHOLPUR HOUSE
tXYtlrX
New Delhi, the 12th September 1988 NOT ICE
The Union PuSiic ,ervicc Comtnisslon have decided to appoint a Committee of Expert.; tc review the scheme of Civil Serviilns Esamina.tion’. In accordance with the

Commission’s decision, the Committee will consist of the
tollowinq members:-
Shri Satish Chandra.. Chairman Ex-Chairman .U.G.C
_.,     Sh. T.R. Sati.sh Chandran.IAS(Retd.! Menber Ex-Chief Secretary, Government of C..arnataka

Sh, S.N. Mathur. IPS (Retd.! Member €:<-Director of IH
a.  Dr. b. Venbata Kamaiah. E~;-Member. JJPSC  Member 
5.  Dr. F. Menezes. Director Taka Management Training Pune.  Institute.  Member 
6.  Sh. C.S. Swaminathan. IfiFfiS (Retd.)  Member 
7.  Representative of of Personnel  the Department  Member 

. ..

Member
f.     Additional Secretary. UPSC
Secretary
-I L.  The  t2rrns  of  rofernce of  the Committee shall be as 
TO’ilOWS: 
!i)  Ta review sod avaluata the system of selection to Pit inZia and L’aitral 5ervices as established as a 1 ~suit of tbn li.othsri Cornmi t=ee repart! and tc to+*:.? r?coiamendations r!nich may be desirable for flurYh?r :mgrQvempnts having reoard inter alia to the needs ot verirus services. .-.-

-298-
4.  The Committee will submit its report months. The report may be submitted that is found expedient.  within si:: in parts, if 
(S.K. LALL) Secretary U.P.S.C. 

APPENDIX -11 QUESTIONNAIRE UN THE REVIEW OF SCHEME OF COMBINED CIVIL SERVICE5 EXAMINATION CONDUCTED BY THE UNXON PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISION
Note (1) In September 1989, the Union Public Service Commissicn have bppointed a Committee of Experts Ltnder the Ch?irmanship ni Dr.Sati.jh Chandra. e:,-Chairman, UnJversity Crants Commission, to review the exrstin3 scheme of Comb>.rled Civil C;er,/icos Eyaminatlon .cI copy of the !VIJ7IC:.E’ clf t1-e I.IPSC a,ppr;~n+irlg the afnre5,aid Conmir+ee and its terms of refrrenco
a,
been able to recruit officers possessing the intellectual and moral attribute5,competence and social commitment. necessary for the due discharge of functions needed for the Indian fidministrative Service, Indian Foreign Service, Indian Police Service and Central Services, Class 1, non-technical?
Note (1) An ’outline’ of the ‘scheme’ introduced since 1977 is at Appendix 11.2. A copy of :Employment News’ containing the Notice of %he most recent Combined Civil Services Examination (i.e Civil Services Examination, 1788) is Annexed (Appendix
11.:)  with this Questionnaire. 
Note (2)  Since  the Combined Ci.vi1 Service  Examination 
was  implemented  from  1979  on  the 

recommendations of the b:otha.ri Committee on Recruitment Policy and Selection Methods. y@u may indica%e your views on the directly recruited officers. who had joined the Higher Civi1 Services from 1780 onwards.
2.     Fleeqe indicate whether YOU would like the present scheme for reeruitrnent to Higher Civil services to continue. or ;tau would like some structural changes. such as a separate scheme of Examination b Interview Test for one or more Services/group of Services.
Note If you recommend a separate ‘scheme‘ of
Examination / Interview Test for a Serviee/group of Services, Please indicate the details of the proposed ‘scheme’. The rationale tor the single examination scheme was given by the Kolthzri Committee in paras 3..14 to 3.17 ot thsLr Report.( FI relevant extract trom Kotharr Committee Report is at,Clppendix 11.4)
5.     In the present ‘schsme’ af Combined Civil Services E!:amination I do you cmsider ttxt qualified cancl-dates from different strata of eociety/diftorent parts of the country have reaeanaD1:r equal opportunity of selection? If in ;*mi-Gpix.!.m the orraeor ‘scheme’ operates in A manner whic5 .creates gr=blrme for candidates from CFr’tBia Ztrata of society/geographical reqions =f tae c011ntr;l ta compete sccressfully? please qrve :!cur suggestions for mcdificatioa the present scheme to ensurp a more rcjuitable
se:ac:1on.
Not0 ti) In the present ‘scheme of examinaticn for-Hipher Civil Services, a candidate r~nwrit3 hislher answers in the Main Examination (1800 marks) and answer questions in the Interview
Tsst’i (250 marks) in either English or any other
Indian bngrlage contained in the Eighth Schedule
of the Constitution of India. The syllabi Ol
Objective Test/Main Examination are generally
framed to reflect the standard of different Indian Universitites for graduate courses at the honour-, level. There are also a large number of ‘Centres’ of Civil Service Examination in different states / Union Territories to enable qualified candidates to appear at the Objective Test/Ma.in E:,:amination,which is held once a year on specified date/dates. The Interview Test of all successful candidates is, however, held ,in the IJFSC at Delhi and 5uch candidates are paid travelling allowance for their journey to and fro by rail from their home torn/place of
residence tn nrlhi..
Note (2) For the most recent Combined,. Civil Services E::amination !i.e. Civil Services E::amination. 1928). the Commission Conducted the ObJectiVe Test in I.9 Centres throughout the countr?*. The Main Examination. 1988, which would commence on the 4th of November-. 1988. would be held in 19 Centre5 throi!ghout the country. The names of the Centres for the ObJective Test and the Main Examination are at Appendix 11.5.
4.     Do yn-u consider that the number of optlonal subJects providgd for the ObJeCtiVe Test (22 subjects) and the Main Examination (47 SubJects) are adequate Do YOLI want to add any new opt1ona1 subJect/d e1e te any ex1sting 0ptiona1
subject either for the Objective Test or for the Plain Examination? Should in your opinion the retention or the deletion of any optional subject in the existinq ‘scheme’ of the Plain Examination be dependant on a minimum number o+ candidates offering that subject or some other criteria?
Note Names of different optional subjects with detail& syllabus are contained -ill the Employment News (Apoondix 11.;)
3. Do Y~U think certain riew subjects in the

acienrn and Technology stream such as medicine and Iurgerry, electrmics, tel-erommunicat Lon engineer;nq, ccmputer mgineerinp, chemical enqinsorin?, aqricul tvra 1 engineerinq, mir; ing and aetallurgy; etc. or any other new subject in the humanities etrean as Education acd Liquistics, etc. should be included in the list of optional subjects tor the Objective Test/llain
E ::amination?
Not. The above list of new subjects is En17 illvstrativa and not exhaustive.
6.-00 you think certain services in the ‘list’ of Higher Civ:l Services require certain special ekills, aoilities, aptitudes, which can be tested only by introduction of specified optioqal subjects which are not included in the
existing ‘scheme’? Do you think candidates for certain H4gher Civil Services should have a specialised Interview Test. which would assess their special aptituteds/attrlbutes for those services only-
7.     Do you think the present method of interviewing a candidate in the Interview Test (total: 250 marks) for the Combined Civil Services Examination is satisfactory? Do you recommend intradu ction of 1ecti_ires , group d is cus sions psycholggical and aptitude tests to supplement the present scheme of Interview Test to ensure a
mare qualitative selection?
Note     At present, the number of candidates called far the Interview Test every year verier; between 1600 to 18C)O and is about .twice the number of vacancies fnr Group A ?, Group B Services for that particular year, Interview Tests are held in the UPSC at Delhi by four or five Interview Boards functioning simulataneously . Each Board is presided over by a Member of UPSC, who is assisted by four Advisers, who are persons of eminence in diverse fields. The Advisers are rotated periodically 4mong different "Boards". Each Board interviews 12 candidates in a day (7 in the forenoon session and 5 in the afternoon session). Candidates can indicate their choice
Ot language tor the Intervimw Tmbt and can opt tcr either English or my Indian languaqr Containtzd ik the Eighth Schmdulr ot the Constitution of India. They would be asked questions in the Interview Test only in the Lanquage of their choice and they could also answer the questions in the same .language. fi revelant extract regarding thm Interview Test as included in the Notice for the most rrcent Civil Services Examination ;i.e. Civil Services Euamrnation, 19883, is at appendix 11.6
e.     Since the standard6 and syllabi at universities in +.he cuuntry are n~t how should they
uniform, be reflected -in the srliabus of the Combinea Civil Services Examination? Should the Combined Civil Services Examin.atXan rotlect the standard% of the lraoCng universities and act as a pace setter?
Note The syllabi of different optional subjects in the Cosbir:ed Civil Services Examination is at Annexed eapy at ‘Employment News’ ( Clppendix
11.3 )
9.     In the present ‘scherne’ of examination tor the Higher Civil Service$? the objective test, which Lo wed tor screening cf candidates for the Main Examination, is confined tQ two papers (General
Studies-150 marks! one optional paper-300
marks). Would you suggest any change?
10 (a) In the Main Examination, where only candidates (ahout 10,000 every year) who qualify on the basis of the Objective Test. appear, there are three subjects of Honours standard of Indian Universities, viz.. a common subject on General Studies (6(:1O marks) and two optional suhjects (1700 marks! out of 47 optional subjects prescribed. Do you think the common suhject on General Studies (601:) marks), which has at present a weightage of only one-third in the scheme of Main Examination (total marks: 1800) should have a higher weightage?
10 18) Will you suggest the inclusion of any Essay paper in the ‘scheme of Main E-amiantlon to assess We overell qcralities of integrated thinking. clear and precise expression and the depth of understanding and apprrciacion of a problem by a candidate"
11 (A) At present. a candidate’s final ranking in the merit list .of the Combined Civil Services Examination is decided on %he basis of hls/her total mark.s in the written papers of the Main Examination (1800 mark’s) and the total mark5 in the Interview Test (250 mark.5). Is there any need to increase the total marks for the Interview Test to ensure a more qualitative
selection o? should they be reduced?
11 (B) "li.othari Committee" on Recriutment Policy and Selection Ilet.hotis (LY7b) had recsmlnended that the candidate aeleilted on the basic the Combined Civil ServJ ces Examinat.ion (I .e. Main Written E:<amination and the Interview Test) will be adni.:tted tn the La: Fe,hadcrr E-hastri National Acaqemy of Pdmin:..st.ration. ilusc,ourie. frllr a "Fo!.indat:m Cours-~" rllf acnut 2. year. It had further r~C~mm~I1dWJ a: locs:ior, to the
+hat varrous Serviccel: *>.I 1 be determinee by the tztai of tho ms:-l-snbtsinrd by the cand:C2re5 a’ the Fair? E:.:sminati,m, Intor.+:ew l-ect and F’occ-Traininq Test conai.;i:ted by ?. ‘ Eloar<‘ constituted bv the UC’SC. Fepzrts on the periTrmar,ce ;Ittribu’es 6.t trainees 6.:/
rrC-~~iaual preparzd the ‘Academy’ wili be s~t~p!ieatc the ‘Eoarrl’ . Whar is yoi-ir VL~Wrqardinp this part of the
rrcominenda:ion ?T t>e Knthari Ccmm:tr_ee? Fiess? spec:f.ic;.;lly :ridic=lte whether si.i.ch a mettnd
WCIU 1d
(a) ecahlc the right type ot candilares to he selacred fur such of the Higher Civil Services for-which Mey have the requisite
aQtltudes. temperament, Lnowlcdst? end
skills.
(b)     proviie the academic inputs needed to enable the f.-ainirrg Institution to discharge such a tunctim.
Not.     ThQ reccmmendation of the Kathari Committee for inclusion c? the ufarks of the Poet-Trainig Test fclr final sllotment of Services has not yet been implrmentrd. Relevant e:ctracts of the Kothari Committee’+ Report iii this regard are at appendix 11.7.
12.     DF y@u havs an:# other sugqestlon wlth regard tm t5e methcc of recruikment for the Higher Civii Sen ires in the comtr;!?
*XIXI*******
APPENDIX -11.1
No. F.22/16/85-E.I(P)
UNION PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION
DHOl_P’IJR HOIJSE

$t**Xl:
New Dslhi. the 12th September 1988 NUTICE
Tile iJi-iion i’i.rul i!: Service Comnission have decided to
appril.nt 6. Committee of E:-:perts t@review the scheme Of
cC’-\/il Servicss E;:aminatio!~. In accordance with the Comiil.issii3n s decision, the Committee will consist of the foili~wi..nq,members:-F’rci. Satrsh Chandra. Chairman ‘Zi. -Cha1rman.U.G.C
~I
5h. T.H. Satish C!?andr?n,TAS!Hetd. E:-OhiSf Secretsr-y . Government :if Ka.rnztak:,s  1  Member 
T.  ‘Sk. ‘3.iN-I1;;thur. IPS (R~td.:i E;:-Cirector of iB  Member 
4.  Dr. b. Venkata E ,-llembar. UFSC  Kamaiah.  member 
?.  Dr. F. Pienezer;. Director T3ta Manaqer~ent Trainlnq Fvne.  Institute.  Member 
b.  Sh. C.5. Sramivathar. 1ARPS ( uetd .)  member 
7.  Representative of Personnel  of  the  Department  Member 

@. Additional Secretary. GPSC Member Secretary
CI L. The terms crf refernce of the Committee shall be as f01lows:
ri)     To review and eval.uate the system of selection to All lndia wd Central Services as established as a result of the Kathari Ccmmittee report, and to make reccmmmdatiofis. which may be desirable for tiirther improvements having regard jnter alia to th+ needs of various services.
(ii!    TO axanine the inclusion of certain uther subjects; particuelrly medical SUbJeCtS, in the scheme of the esimivation and also e::clusion of any subJeet. it sonsiderod ceeassary .
(iii:TQ e:;:tmine the introducticn cf lectwes, group discussions. nrycnoloqical and aptitude tests R~C.. in the recruitment prncedure.
>     an.., other matte which ir: the. opinion of the Committee has a brarlnp on the aforesaid items or whicp may bz rcfrrrsa C.5 the Committee by the Cormissicir .
3.’     For its fbnctioning, the ICormitte.e will devise it5 awn procedur-sr and it may set up such -study groups aqd take the’ a.rsietance of such experts as it may consider necessary in consultation with the Commission.
4.  The  Committee will  submit  its report  within  six 
months.  The  report may be submitted  in p’aarts,  if 
that  is found expedient. 

(S.E. LALL) Secretary
U.P.S.C.
WPENDIX 11.2
BRIEF NOT€ ON CIVIL 6ERVICES ETC. EXCmIWTION CONDUCTED BY THE UnP.8.C.
The Civil Services .etc. examination conducted wrry year by the U.P.S.C. caters to the two All Indi’a Services, vi:.., IaS? IPS? the Indian Foreign 9ervice, sixteen Central Group A Services and eignt Group 8
Services.  K$  is  held in three staqes, ‘the first  two 
Comprise  written  examinaticnsr  while the third is  the 
Interviaw Tesz. 

To br eligible for the abeve examination, a candidate has to fulfii the follorsinp rcnditionr : li! Be a citison af 1nG:a f.citi:ens of Nenai and Wutcn .fer Centi-3: Serv1.c.s only). ?ii! Pe 21-26 years cf age an first of Aug~st cf the year of a!;amrn%tian.
i,1i.i 1.     Ho;d a degrc-. =tW a recgqvised Univsrsity. Aeiaxation in upper age limit’is available fcr spacifiod categories. Each candidate is allnwrb Got 1nn-e than throe attempts at the .::amination. ?his rzsrrictran on number of attempts does nat howerer apply to X/PT candidates.
The first staGe of the selection pmcess is a Preliminary. examination, which is of an objective -type with multiple choice qucstions. It consists of tQo
papers  (each paper being  of  two  hours  duration)  which 
are  as follows: 
1.  General Studies  150 marks 
2.  Optional  SAbJeCt  3(:iC1  rnark.5 
Total  450 marks 

For the uptional subject. 3. candidate has to choose one of the foliowing 22 subjects :
I. Aqricu1ture
i.-l
Animal Husbandry and Vet.erinary Science.

-2. . Botany
4.
Chemistry

5.
Civi1 Enqineering 6" Commerce

7. Econoini’:s
0. E1ectrica.1 Engineer1ng
9. Oeoqr.aph:,
1’3. Geolcq;i
11. Indian History
12. Law

1.,z . Mathemat:-c5
14.
Nechacical Engineering

15.
FihilasOphY

3.6. Ph:/ ";ics
1.7. Political Science 1R. Psychology
19. Public Administration :?<I . Sociology
The objective type papers in the first stage are nt the gradu?.te level of Indian Universities. The examination is generally held on the Second Sunday of the month of Zl-tne. The results are declared around the Tlst of Jviy of the SdmC year. By this process. about
1 cari~;’idaC.es .are shrr;r?–l isted tr: ;rbr;ut LO. candidates. whn ta4s ttw second sta.ge ot the e:camir~z,t:m7. (iVotil.: Tha abi:ve f igurss only relate to the last such examinakicn held and are broadly indicat2.ve ”+ the ni!cnhr?r of ia?4ilates, who +re el13ible to apcs=ar to? tne 5er_i>rlo >+act?of tile r<.:aminntion:I .
conventrona! (esss?:i?:‘:el papsrsds under : Paoer I Indian lan\guage
(GI11 Schedule)
U candidate hss to choose CI and A from a given set of
optional subjectsj, which include, apart from the 22
subjects prescribed for the Preliminary Examination, new
~ubjects such as Anthropology Management, language and
literature of Indian lang~lages contajned in the Eighth
Schedule of the Constitution of tndia and the language
and lit.erature of English. Pall, Chinese, Clrabic,
Persian! German! French and Russ1a.n Thus the total
number of cptional subjects for the Main Examination is
47, which includec 23 langiiages and literatures and two
new subJect.; (1.e.. Qnthropology and Management;. There
are certain restricticns on candidates in the choice of
optioval .;i.ib.:er_tc. as the:’ a.re no+ aiiowed to offer the
fa1Inwing coinbinatirins of optional subjects:
F’olitical Science and International Relations and
F’ub1ic Fla minic traticn:
L’cmmerce and Rcccontanc? and Management:
Antiircpoiogy and Scciology:
Mathematic’1 and Statisticc:
Aqricxi "itre and Animai H~isbzndr;!. and Veterinary
Science;

Management F P~!blic Administration;
Of the Enqinserinq sub:acts, vix., C.ivi1
Engineering Elect.r~cs1 Engineering Mechanical
E,nginerlri.ng-not mcr-e than one subject.

Papers I and 11 which are of Oua~ifylngnature are of the Matriculation level. The standard of optional svb;ects at the Main Examination (1.e. second stage) are Of Honours level of Indian Universities. In the Main
Examination, the aggregate marks eftective.fcr purposes at ranking in the conventional type papers ere 1800 (General-S tudies-&OO 3 tm optional subjectr-kod mrrvs each; i.e.g1200).
The candidate have the choice to answer the G-.ner.al StuGies arid optronal papers (other than. lai-fiiaqq md literature papers) either in the medium of Englion cr rn any 07 the lanqunges listed in the .Eighth FSchet?*alo .?-:
the Const i tution.
The thsrd stage cmsrsts’gf the Infervi+c: Test =.in? carries 2Sv marks Trre number OF cmdr&-.tu=: call~d fw-the Interview ‘rest is based on th..:ir rrlatl..e peryormancn in +.he ila:n Eraminatisn, ‘-he ;IuCnaer r>? car?didate> far !:rtervi% Test I.arbss tr?tueen lY>f’ tr 1500 and is rbaut tkice the number cf vicancies ‘-7 G,-OLF A and P Services propgsed to iIE! filled UCJ i3 tist oartrcular ,feer T:ie Intcr\,isbi Test irheld gsis.-?.:!:. zr. April-%ay 3:’ the the year following the year ii &:nc:h the prr?! irninzry .wd main ex?miea:ims as-c qrLc.. Interviews ITS r;onductcd by four or f;ve :rtet-vz.et.i Boards tunzticrrinr: simultaneu!\s 1y . Ed=? b.?:;r.3 1.5 presided over by a.’P!Qmber of tt:e Corrmiscir; who is dJsi5ted by four-advisers, Who are eminent pev-sons drawn from diverse field. The Board
advisers ~?-ea~r, are rotated at periodic intervals. Each. Erard interviews 12 candidat@o(7 in the foremon and 5 i.-th+ afternoon) in
a day. Candidates have the @ptlon to answer questions in the interview either in the same language medium they had chosen for the CS (Main! ,Eramination or in English.
The merit list of candidates is prepared on
SLICC~S~~~.I~
the  basis of  their  aggregate mar!=  secured  i~  t-e  main 
r.:amination  (180(? marl 5)  and  Interview  Test  (250 
mark F.! (total:X50 marks). 

The final result is decls.red generally i~ the first week: of June nf %he year in which Interview Test is held. Thus the whols przcess from the date cf the F’relirninary e.;amina.-iion to the da.ts of the flnal result takes a>oc!t a :.sat-.
****1*x1***
ClPPENDIX -11.Z
E H P L 0 YmME N T N E W 8 SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT NEW DELHI, SATURDCIY, 19th DECEMBER 1987
UNION PUBLIC SERVICE C~MMISBXON
~~
NOTICE
CIVIL SERVICES EXPIMINATION, 1988

THE CENTRES AND TEE IXTES F.HCIL2ZbIG U:-E ::x-i.4I:lfiT[Cf.! AS PiENTI(?NED fABlYVE ARE: LIWLE TTJ BE CHANGEC A? THE Dl’SCRE.:I!;r.i OF THE COMMISSION. WHILE EVERY EFFDRT WI’J.. t35 MADE f:l ALLOT THE CClNDIDGTES TO. THE CENTRE OF THEIR CHOICE FCF EXCIMINATION. THE CUMMIS5:ON MCIY, AT THEIR DISCRETION, RLLClT C\ DIFFERENT CENTRE TO CI CCINDIDCITE. WHE.N CIRCUMSTPNCES S@ WARRANT, CWDIDCITES ADMITTED TO THE ExAnxmrToN W:LL PE
4.ELIGIBILITY CONDITIONS I
Nationality: For tW Indian Administrative Sefvice and the India Poa.ice Service a candidate must. be a citizen of India. Fcr other servic&s, a candidate murrt be either ;-CI citizen of India, ur ii subject of Nepa:; Or a sub.jecf. gf Bhutan, of CI Tibetan refugee who came over to India before 1st January , 19b2 with thc inter.tion of permanently settling in India, or a person of Indian crigin who has migrated from Pzkistan, Bwinrz, Sri Lanka, East Mrican countrrc% af kenya, Uganlr. the 1Jn.rtad Republrc of Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi Zairn ind Ethiooie and .Vietnam with tne intentim af permanently settling 111 India.
Provided thit a caiid:Qt.s c~eicnr;ing t:~cetegorles (bj, tc) (d! and (el shall be a pzrron !.n whaae f.vuur a certificate of eliqiXlity has been isuec. b;. the Govm-noent of India. P-avidEd fiirther that candidates Sclonying to categorjes fb),(c), and !d) above riil riot be eliqible for rpporntment tr the Idian roreign Service.
4 candidate in bih@SE casq a certificate of eligibility is iiecessary mey be admitted to the examination but the nffer Of appointment may be given Qnly after the necessary eligibility crrtificate has been issrsed to him by the Government of
I..ldia.
INFORRED OF THE TIRE TABLE AND PLACE OR PLACES OF EXAMINATION (See pare B (ii)below).
2. Services/posts ta which recruitment is to be made
through the Examination are:
Indian Administrative Service
Inaian Foreign Service
Indian Police Service
Indian Audit and Pccounts Service, Group A
Indian Customs arid Central Evcise Service Group P
Ind.’.an Defence ficcounta Servi.ze, Grbup A
Indian Income Tax Service, Grnup A
Indian Ordance Factories Service, Group P
(&ststance Flanocr-Knn-Technical) .
Indian Postal Service, Group fi
Ir,dian Civil Accounts Survicf drotrp A
Indian Railway Trarfic Service, lircup /A
Indian Railway Pccciunts Service, ijrorrp A
Indian Pailway Feraorrcc!. S.drv::e! ‘3roup fl
Post of Assistant Securjt:* Off;cw-j, Group A in
Railway Protection Fnrce.
Indian Defence Fstatos Service, iirnup ‘CI’
Iiidian InformaKion Service I.;cinior Grade IQroup CI
!-lii)Benerd! Trade Service, Grouy: A (tirade 111) (Xi:<! Posts of Acsistent Commandant, Group ‘FI’ in Central Irdustrial Security Force. (xrl Centrzl Secretariat Serivce, Group B’ (Section Officcrs Grade) Lrxii Railway Boara Secretariat Service Group ‘B’ (Section
Aqe Limits :
CI candidake must have attained the age of 21 years and’
must not ha-fe attairied the age aC 26 years on I*t
August. LJ88, i.e. he mvst have been born not earlier
than 2nc? August, 1962 ar.d nat later than 1st August
1967.
The upper age limit. prescribed above will be reIi4Xabl€.

upto a maximcim of five years if d cacdidate belnngs t.3
a Schelu:ed Caste or a Schedule: Tribe.

a ScherJuied Cri+.s or d RChrsdiiIed Tr?.be and ip a!co :I bona ,ride$:jrsplit.-.edperson irarn erstwh~.La. East F.rl ~cl:en
(now Ranq?.r Ues:?) arid had migrated to India durin2 the period between Irt Jml.twy, la64 and 25th Harch. 1971; upto a maxirium cf thr.?!r yews .if a candidate is a hen+ fids repatriate or 5 prospect-%ve repatriate of Indian origin ft-sm Sri I-anL.3 arid has miqrated t.u India on or after 1st November, 1944 or is to migrate to India, under the Indo-Ceylon Aqreemrnt of October, is64 upto a marimurn of eight years if a csndidqte belongs t.g a Scheduled Caste ~r d Scheduled Tribe and LS aiso a bond fide repatriats or a pr*>spective repartriate c?
Indian origin tror Sri Lankd and has migrated to India on or after 1st November, 1964 or is to migrate to india under the Ind@2eylon figreament ot October, 1964p
(*Ji:    upto e maximum of three years if a candidates is of Indian origin and has migrated from Kenya, Uganda and the United. Republic of Tanzania iformerly Tanganyika dad Zanzibar) or who is a repatriate of Indian origin from Zambia, Walawi, Zaire ad Ethiopia;
(v’ii     fAptCJ a maximum of eight years if a candidate belongs to a Scheduled caste & 3 Scheduled Tribe and is alsc a Son% fide -epatriate of Indian origin and has migrated +ram C:anya, IJgsnda and ,the. United .Republic af Tapzmia, ifoi-merly Tangenyrka and Zanzibar: or is a repstriate UT Indian w’iqin from Zambla, Malrwi. Zaire and Ethiopia;
:viii)upto a rnarimum at three years if 9 tanddate is a bona fidE ropatr?.ate CT indian urlqrrl frmn Burma and has migrated to India on or affar 13. .Jupz. 1763;
!ix)     uptc s maAimurn gf eiqlit years. if a candidate belongs tn a Scheduleci Caste or L Scnduled TriDe and i5 also a bona *ide repartiate s.i Iiicim oriqln from Gurra ana has migrated tc India rn or after 1st June, 19633
i-1     u;ts a maximum of three year in the case? of Defence Services personnel disabled in operations during hostilities with any foreiqii country or in a disturbed area and released as a consequence ‘there-of.
(:ti)     upto a maximum of eight years in the case of Defence Services per.;orinel. disabled in operations during hostilities with any for@iqn countrv r.r in a disturbed area. and released as a consequence thereof and brlonq to the Scheduled Castes or the Schedclled Ti’ibes;
(xii) upto a ne~imui~i thrse years if a candidate is
of a
bonaf ide rcpatria+.e of Ilvjian orioirr !Indian pa?sSport ho1der)fram Viztnam as 3:so a rmdidate hu!.dLnq emergency certAf icat.e to Bin b;. Indian Embass-!
i55.!eId
in Vietnam and &ha arri~~’J :r=m Vietnatr, nc-.
ir! Tndia earlier t.han Ju:? 197Z:
!ri ii)iipto a maximrm r,f elc!:+y :;ears :-‘B candidatis tel.anf;sr to F Scheduled c’~e,tecr ‘.!=hedu?sd TcI5s and i5 alsu .i bonaf ide reptri.ltc of Irdran Orisin ! :nd.ian p.rae;::-~.k holder) ‘4s else a candidate holding omergen:-:; certif ic.it.0 issued to ni.s by the ;II.~LP~Embr:i!iv i;:
Viet:ram  arid whr.  s.rr-:,*Jsu,  ir :n.:ia  +-rm Vietnam and  rut .I 
arrived  in  Indie  fr?m  Yirttzes nnt elartier  than  Jc!:;. 
1175. 
xiv) rrpto  P  sa::imu,r  94  f i.:Y  yecr~.i.r.  $30 . zase.  ,3?  e:. 

servicemen anb ccmn:icsrnned C)f f :..:zrg i;lcl,*dir-c! ECPs/SSCGz whc Peve riwdersd at leist +.ive :.rarz Milifat-./ ServLcs a9 on 15L Aia3ust. :?S5 ai-i ha-,.? ijcer! released (i) on corl~p?etJ.?mUIaasicjnncnt (1~c:’uJ.i.n~ those uh~se s:ssifnmcnt is di:e ta be cgrnpleted t91rhin six months from 1st hgust, 1?9R! otherwise than by wa? of dismissal or discharge on account of mieeondttct or inefficiency, or (iil on account of physical disaoility attributable to Mrlitzry Szruice ar (ii:.’! on
inval idment;
(::v)     upto a maximum of ten years in case of exservicemen and Commissioned officers including ECOs/SSCOs who haw rendered at least five ysarr Military Service s on 1st Pugust, 1988 and have been released (i)on completion cf assiqnnent tinclirding those whnse aseignment is due to be completed wikhin six months from 1st Clugust 1988) otherwise khan .by way of dismissal’ or discharge on acc?imt of miiconduct zr inefficiency, or (ii)on accatrnt 01 physical d?.sshility attributeable to Yiltary Eer*-.icF? cr <ii:lm Invelidment: who belong tc; the Scheduled Castss -7r the Scheduled Tribes.
C::vl)     uptr, a maYimrrm of rive.years in case of ECOsfSSCOc who have completer: a11 ir:itial period af assiqnemnt of five years of WJ Litary Srrvie aE on 1st CluguEt, 1958 3nd v~hose ascignamnt has torn extended beyond .five years and In wh=i,sr case the Pmistry c;f Defence issues ce?rtifica?s :hat Chis!: c:w rppX;8 for civil employment end they WI.!~ be relesard m thr?e mdnths notice en sqlection fxm fhs dace OT receipt of offer of a:>goi11 t.rPen+:
::..vii:ur\t.u :t msyw-irn of tEr. ;esarr, in caps of ECGs/SSCQe who heve comp~~cud ifirtial period sf assignment af five
an years of nilttary Ser*..icT. 15 on 1c.t Ac!q~st, 196s and wh~zse assiyinrnt has hen evter.dt.j Seypnd f i*Je yearc %id in whase case. the Ministry of Defence issuer a .rwt.ificatc Chat they cm ;pply tor civil employment and that the? wiil be relsa.sed on three months notice m se1ecti.w from tne date of receipt-of .offer of

(iii )plinimrim Fducw nal (Tal if icaw


A candidate must hold a degree af any of Universitics incorporated by an Act of the Central QrState Legislature in India or other Educations! institutions establishes by an Act of Parliament or declareu to bc deemed as a Unfversit:. under Section 3 of the University Wants Cammissson act, 19% @r pmsaess an equivalent qualification. Note Is Candidates who have appeared at an examination t3e passing of which would render them edbcationrlly qualified fzr the Commisaian s esam-.anticn b1.t hsve not 5em iniormra of thi results as also the candidates wIio intend to appear at such’a qualifying examination will a155 bi+ eligible fgr-admission ta the Pre! iminoi-:. Examma+.im. hi ! Candida+.ES rho are declared quali+;ed by :be ~m~~bi~~sic~tita*.ixj the Civ.1 i Sarvi.css
f<T !Main; Exarniaption v.11 te rwuiaa 50 produce proaf 31 passing the reouicite examinet;oa kith thsir application f~i-tClemMain €::amin .at run.
Note 111 In the excaptinma1 casss thFUrrion Public Seraicz Commission RS.? trest a candidate who mas not any of ths fcregoinp qL!allfiCrt.dUm as ii quaiFficro canrjld+te providei that he has 9351811 weminatirm coriGucted by othe:-institutianr, the standard 0.f which in the apinisn rif the Commission, justifies his admissinn t.3 the sxeminaticn.
Noto 1111 Candidates possessing professional and technical qdalifications which are recognised by Government as equivalent to prnfessional and techincal drqree would also

candidates who are otherwise eligible.
Provided further that ‘a candidate who, on the basis of the

results of the previous Civil Servier Examination, had bean
allocated to the I.P.S. or Central Service. Oraup ‘A’ but who
expressed hi3 intention to appear in the next Civil Services
Rain Examinat.ion for competing for I.A.S., I.F.S., I.P.S. or
Central Services, Eroup ‘a’ and who was permjtted ta sbstair?
from the probationary tralnimq in ordsr to 59 appear, shall
be eligible to da3 so, subject tu the Drcvreions Gf the para
4(v) (b: of this Notice.’ If the candiate is allocatpd to =I
service on he basis of the next Civil rcrrices Main
Examination, he shall join either that Service or the ServLcF
to which he was allccated on the basis of the pi-F#i%.nsCivi!
Services ExaminationI failing whi ch 31s a! liesflion ‘2 tPn
ser’+ic+based an one of both eramiantims, 8s the C~F?may be-
shall stand cancelled and notwithstanding anrtbing cmtained
in para 4 (v) fa) of this Notice. a canlidati Y~G tcrcrpt.;

allocation to iService and ir appsi?tt+d ‘lo a-Servicd. nh9.1:
not br eligible to appear ilqain in the Civil S!sr-~:L.zs~:
Examination unisss has has first resigned frsr the sac..

9.c~.
Note : 1. An attempt at a Preliminar/ E::amrnation sh;. . 1 be deemed to be an attempt at the examiration.
2. If d candidate acutally appears i.l any one paper iri the preliminary Examination, he shall be deemd t3 have made an attempt at the examination.
T Not!.rrthstend inp the oisqua1ificat-ionIcar.csl1atxon of
*.
candideture, the fact c+ appearance of tho caradidate at the examination rill Taunt as .an attempt
(v) Restrictinns 05 apclrin~Tsr the rxnmintion:
against that service in co1.3 below 0i1 the results ot this examination.
S1.No. Service to which aporoved Set–‘.,ice for which fnr aDpoifitment eliqihle r.0 compete
(i) iii) lil>
___ __.. -.-
1. Indian Police Service
S.Fee:
Secretary, Union Public Service Commission at the New’ Deih General Fost Office. CSndid3ter res;cling abroad snr?,-l’ld deposit the prescribed fee in the Office of Inhia’s 3igh Commissioner, Ambassador or Reprezentative ebro*d, 55 the
case may br, for credit to account head "051-Public Service Commission-Examination Fees" and attach the receipt with the application. CCINDIDCITES BELONQING TO-SCHEDULED CASTk/SCHEDULED TRIBES ARE NOT REQUIRED TO PRY CINY FEE. Central Recruitment Fee Stamps (:\10T postage stamps) may be obtained from the post office ann affixed on the application form in the space provide therein. The stamps may .be got cancelled from the issuing Post Office wigh the date stamp of the aost. oifice in such a memar that. the impressicn of the carrce!latit?n 2;tarnc partial ly uvcrf:ows srs the rpalicatisr form itself. Tbe inpressicn oT the c.+nccllation stamp shou’lc he clear-and distinct ts facilitahe the rdenciticatinn :;f data and thv Foel: O+tice ::f issue.
Postage Stamps’ wil: ~n n.2 case br aczczted in Li<= zf
Central Rscruitment Fee stemps. L’dfldidstoc zhcu?d note that the fee sent zhr-cwgti Monss. ;""-?I-. Crossea Ciwque. CurrEnry noier or Treasury ria I :an W: ., i 3-7 be accented by the C3rnciirsion and such apolicatiuns ‘v’11 1’4 treatee a~ withcut. fee and wrll be summarilv rejcctcev The Cnmmissmr! ma’/ at t!ie?-r r’iscretior; rem -.t the ?..-:-.-< -rtlez fee where they art? aat’.j<ied that the ?.pplicant ❗ 3 L.mrl. fide displaced person frcm ers%while East Pakistan i’ XU
Eangla Dcshi and had migrated to Iiidia during tl-e pe*r:cr+ 1.1.1964 to 25.3.1972 cfr is a bona fidr repatriate cf Ir-ciafi origin from Burma or Sri Lanka and has migrated tc India on or after 1.6.1963 ocd 1.11.1964 rrspectively c:’ is a
prospective repatriate of 1I:dian origin from 3ri Lankr under
the Indo-Ceylon Aqreement of October 1963 or is a bons tide
displaced’ person from er-ntwh.i:e West PaKirtan whg had miqratrd
to India during t.he period between 1st January, 1971 ann 31:st
Parch, 1973 and 15 not in a position to pay the prescribd

tee.
Note I : Candidates should write their name and addrer?i=
on the reverse o+ Bank Draft st the ‘top at the :::iInT pi
submission of their application. 11 the case af Pos-r.31 Ordv

the vame and address shmild ~e written SY tne candii!aros .21?
the reverse of the Postal Order at C5e SJJCR prf:.:-.2e-f iap-tPu
purpose.
Not. 11 : Fec mce paid shal! rwc bc re<cmdsrl iirlr+C.-.7;’.’
circumstances e:?r,o~ta?: prc-/irlscl 1.n luci.e 1 :7 DC?low, i.:m –I,:-,

the fee be ,a:+ in rsspr-e +.zr ah ot.hs.r-E ~ini~?et…;: n:-
ealcetion.

Not. 111:
1:

my
cmipidrte w5g took the Civi?
C;’C.:T~.!.CSS
Examinatian hold in 5787 wi.shes to apply for admi%.;ion ~2 this examinatisn, he must wbmit his applrcation %c as. co reach the Commission’s Off:ce by thtz prmecribed datz wi.;hocL waiting far the -esu?ts or am nfter c+ spaorntrnent. ii %? -5 recommended for appointment on tm resuite 0.f the. 196′: examination, IUS candidarwe for this esamfnatior wii i *s>
cancelled on request and the fee roiunded to him prcvided
that  the request for  cance!.iaticn  Qf  candieature and  rrJtmd 
of  lee is received in  the Commissi~n’s Office  on  or  bpfore 
30th July,  1588. 

Note IV b Candidatds admitted to the Main Examination will
be required to pay a further fee or Rs.50/-(Rs.Fifty) CANDIDOTES BELONGING TO SCHEDULED CASTET/SCHEDULEb TRIBES ARE
NOT REQUIRED TO PQY arw FEE:
6.HOW TO APPLY :
A candidate seeking adnjssian to tF.e Prel imini;r..t E-aminatior must applv to the Secretary, Vnim Public Ser\,?.cz Commission Dholpur Hcuso, New nelhi-110011. t!??ol!gh the apfilicatinn fcr+ published m paqec 13klS. The =ant?i.jatcie ray iIti!isic i .. Qriginal the form published in the rwwsjpapers or i?, ‘Employment Nel.rs filling up the columns w?.th ha!i-pc:q* pm. The*! nay alsa *.t4~?+.he appl icat.ion ‘form and attendzn.:e chrv: neatly typewraf>em .m ivl:ite paprr of foolscap sF:s I::!. *.a’s 30 ems) in C~uil~? Pped on cnlv one side C+
%.o.accmd :.he paper. there is no abjection to c~ndidatec using orj!ited Ppplicatirm Fur%and 4ttendSnc~? Sheet. 1.f avsilab:r. f’rom private +paq:z:e5.5s l–Jngas th;? fi:jrm)e<: is g:ra.:ti,: t!?e ::+.?= 38 published on page 12 & 15 of thy3 advertiremmt. Applicitrnne filled in cn the format used for tha Cwvimc e::amin%Lims wi 1 i not be ccrp idsrrd. Candidat.€. cht:.. i i nnte that, tho? shor!ld a!zpea: in the Civil Sw-vaces €.:?mi:: .:L?~ fst all the papers ir. the Euamin=tion on the same c?rnizs.a-. certifist.. and with the same rn11 naamber even if they ma:’ have received mcre than one admission certificate fmm rhe Commission. The envelope cmtrininq the. applicstion sho.:ld
be superscribed ‘n bold letters as :
"CIPPLICATON FOR CIVIL SERVICE8 (PRELIPIINCIRY) EXCIPIINCITION,
1988′.

(a) A candidate musi =end the following dccumente with his application P-
(i)Crossed Bank Drattiindian Poctel Orders or Centrai Recruitment Fee Stamps or Indian MisEion Receipt fcr the prescribed fee ‘(un1s.s rcmision of fee is claimed) Central Rectt. Fee Stamps should be pasted on .the Application .farm in the space pro.didea fGr the purpose.
(ii) Plttendance Sheet
(iii)Two ideritical copies of recent pssn~artsize (5 cm 7cm approx.) photograph ot the candidates me pasted cn the pa:licat.ion form and the rjther on %:!a Attendance Sheet in t?c
space provided thersir?.
(iv)
One self-addreasel post card. (v! Two self-addraased unstampud envelopes of 11.5 cm K Zi.:? cm 5ize. (O! Candidates shouid note tnat only International form c:’ Indian numerals are to be used while filling up the application form. The?) should tehe special care thst thz entries made in the appliction farm should be clear an:i lsgible. In case there ;re any illegible or mielsadin(! entries, the candidates will be responsible for the confusion and the ambiuuity caused iwinterpreting such entries.

(c)
All candidates, whether already in Government Service, or in Government owned industrial undertakings, or other

similar organisations or in private am~loyment, should suhit
their applications direct to the Commission. If any
candidate forwards his application-through his employer and
it reaches the Unicn Public Servie Commission late, . the appliction, even if submited to the employer before the closing, date will riot be cmsidered. Peroons already iri Bovrrnmefit servics whether in a permanent or temDorary capacity Qr as work char-ged employees other than casual or daily ret.ed F?npiu:/ees or those rrrvina under Public Enterprises dry. however, required ta submit an cmdertzk?.:-g that the: hn-re ifi*rnrm-:j ir, writing +heir head of Clfficet’Departmerit that they have applied for the Er.+mrnstron. Candidate; etmuld nntu that in c;se 3 commur:.ica+irm :a received 5rnm the17 crpluycr b.. the Czmmie-sion witnholdxnp permi.;sii?r> tc tbe c.mdidat?s appJ:rFnC) forfappoaring a,?. the. e8arninatic.n. :heir epplicatdsns shall be rFtjectedicandIdati!re .. shall be cancelled.
CIPPLCICITIUNS ANY CERTIFICATES IN SI.:PFORT OF THEIR CLAIMS REGCIRDING AGE, EDUCATiONAL BUCILIFICRTZONS, SEHEQULEI? CPSTES CIND SCHEDULED TRLRE AND FEE REMf3SION ETC. WbXH WILL BE
VERIFIED AT THE TrME OF THE MAIN EXAMINATION ONLY. THEY SHOULD THEREFORE, ENSURE ‘THAT THEY FULFIL ALL THE ELIGIBILITY CONCITIONS FOR CIDMISSION TO THE PRELIMLNARL
EXAMIaNTION,  THEIR  &,DMISSIUN TO  THE PRELIHIIWRY EXCIHINATJON 
WILL  ALSQ  TWEREFORE  EE  PIJRELY  PROVISIONAL.  IF  ON 
WRIF  rcAr IorJ  CII  ANY  Lfi’rEt? DWE  IT  :s  FOUND TiiaT THEY  DO  NOT 

FULFIL ALL THE Et.IUIQILITY CONDI~IUCEI~, THEIR cANDIDAT-ukE WILL BE CANCELLEir. IF ANY CF TblEIfi: CLAIMS IS FOUND TO BE INCOPREC7, TYE’r MAY RENDER T:iEilSE!-VES LIABLE TQ DISCIPLINARY CICTIGN BL THE CuilRlSSIDr! IN I’ERFS OF RULE 13 OF THE RULES FOP THE C?VIi-SEf:VIEY EXAM:NPTXON 1C3B RESRODUCE3 BELOW.
A cmdiddate who is or has Seen declorvd Qy tns Commission tc De guilty of: ti) ubt-dining suppcrt !’QT :us uzsflflida%!r-e h;. any *earls: at-(i.1; rcpsramatirq: 01 (iii1 Frrjcuring imperionaticn cy itny Edrscn; or’ [ ivj submitting ?r’ aocirmenL-e wiiich navz
tabricsted -ioc~.ment%
been tatnpcreo with; w-(Y! making ata:.etnonLs which am mcorre:t. or fa:js ,yr-sup~reseix~mrteriei informatum; CIT
(vr:     resorting t@ an:! other irreipAl.*r or i3proper mns.n~ in connection with h~s randidatire for the exaqiqetion; 01-
ivii) using urrfair mans during the examinaticn; cr (viillwri tin4 irrelevant matter inMuding obscene language pronographic matter. in the sci-iot(s); or
(ix)     misbehaving in any other manner in the,examlnation hall; ar (r() harassing OF doing bodily harm to the staff empiIYYSQ by the Cornmissim for She conduct of their examinakimi; at-
(xi1     violat-ng any of the in5t.ructions issued to carilidates a1cnqk.ikb their ahiseinn cer,ti.Jiratos permittrnq thxi
t.o. thko tbr examination: cf. (:{ii) ta csmnit as the case may be abetr.ng thE
aktemptir.g or CGID~.~~S~O~al! cr ariy the acts sorci’ied ;<I t6.2
of rcre~uinq c:ai:scs m+:: in addition to renaer-inp hi i~zs;el* lia3le tc crininal prcsenltion, be liable –
la: ti: 5s disqual14iad by .the Carnmizsion +ram T.>~E eyauninstisn tnr wnrch he is a cmdidate: or fb! tn be debw-rrl either ~ermancntl:~cr ‘..,?: s speci f iei per1.ud:.-I ri b:; the Commissicn, from any examinatiov 0:-
selectim held by ttwe :ii;b:! thn .i:eneraI Ocv5rnn;sni: it-zrn an.! smr: ov*~:%n’.
l.~O<?r’Ihsln: Ai1d i-1 ifh.rr Fc ail.eed! 1′; ser.,ics undar 6cverninGr :. tu
uia.::ipl ins?.. aFtior, r~ndarthr+ appropriste ri.!le~.
Pro’,-iOFd that no pnna! Iry unner this rul" shall be Imnoeed l?::capr A?t?r :-!i) yiviny ti~?csndidrte an opportun1ty of mz:!:i.ng such
represrntetion in riiting as he mar wish. t.o make in that behalf, and
(ii)  taking  the reprmrentation,  ifany,  submitted by  the 
candidate,  within  the  period allow ed  to  him,  into 
considerat.ion 

7.     LAST DATE FOR i(ECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS I The eomp!cted Application Form: muct reach the Secretzry , Union Public Servie CommieEion, Chclpur Hmtse, New Delhi-.l10011 by pozt or by persona: deliver.: at the counter on a befai-e 1st February, 1938 115th February !.W6 in case of cindidates residipg in Assam, Meqha1ay/a, Arunachs 1′ pi-alesh. Mizcram Manipl-r . Nagal’and, Tripura, Silrkim, Cadahh 0i.iion ‘cT J&F. St.atn, Lah.al.il anrj Spiti 0ist.t-1::: .an.-? Panpi Sub-Division n: Chamba district u+ Himez.:hal Pradesb, rqndacsn anal N.icoDar t iiand-. GI-C~~.ksnadweup anl fclr canai3at.zb residing aQr-l>id +rr:-ii a d?ts pricr tu Tit FStbruBry. ‘ 1WE and whose applications are ceeeived by post frm one at the areas. mentioned above) accoapained by neress&ry documents. & +y.p’I icstion rnczi..rcd after ,the, prescribed date wi?l cle considered.
c\ Fandidate reSlC!.’.:q Ll: ~OSdin, Meghaiaya, firlJndChd.1. Pradeah, Msnipur, klraram. Flaqaland, Tripurz , Sikkir;;. Ladakh Divirm or GRk State Lamu1 an4 S~itiDiitric?
and Panpi Sub Division nt Chamba district of. Hlmacha: Pradesh, findaman and Nicobzr ‘Islands or Laksbdweep and a candidate residing abroad may at the discretion of the Commission be required to furnish documentary evidence to show that he warn rmriding in Assam., ReghaIaya, Arunilchrl Pradesh, PIiz’oram, Hanrpur, Nagaland, Tripura, Siklrim iadakh Divison cf J&K State! Lahaul and Spiti Districts and Pangi Sub Divisiop of Chamba district. oi Hirnehal Pradesh, Clndamar. Nicobar Islands or Lakshadweep rtr abrosd frm a date pricr t= 1st Fehru+rv, i98e.
Note I ti) Candidstes who are from areas entitled to additiona; time for submissicn of applications should also clearly andirate in thzir addresses in the relevant ‘.:olumn of the application the ?.air of’ t:w praticular area cs-vqion rntitled to adc!’;tonii kin2 (e.g. Yssarn. Meqhalaya, Cadakh Division of JBK ‘itate etc.) Dtherwlsa they may not :jet. the benefit c: additionn.! time.
Note I (ji! Candi4atns ars edvised to de1:vw-their agplicati3ns hy kand at. the WSC cnunter or send it by Rsqistered Pcst. The Commrs!sion will got be rescmsible for the applications d+liusrF?d tc en:. sth,?r funCtImTr:l of the Ccmrnissim.
NO fiFPLIC&TIUM FFCE:’IE3 PFTER THE PPEBCRIBEIi r-6′.X klLL BE
CONSIDERED

8. CDRRESPONDENCE WITH THE COilPlISSICN
The Cornmissinn will not enter into my corresponaence with
the candiaatr about their candidaturs except in the ?@:lowinG,
cases:

(i)Every application including late one received in t.he Commission’r ‘Jffice is acknowledged an0 Application
Rqirtration No. is issued tt the candidate in token 09 receipt at application. The fact that. the Application RegistratirJn No, has been isc;ucd to t5e cardiddrt.ea does not. ipso-facto. mean that the applxtion !s complete in 311 respects and hrir bern urzeptrd 13.r tne Cammisaron. If a candidato does no5 recive rr. acknowlet2gament SJf his application wl.thir? 45 days t i-=.:i: the last clatc. of receipt of apDlicatirlns for the exieimtinr:, he chmld at once contcct the Gommi%E!.c? fat-the ac?ncrlelgenent. Ever? canaldate for this s%amri>S.t*.Oh b.111 be rn*rr"~cd at the esl-liC?lt IJOSSiDle di?te {Jf tTSn?t 13.f his application. :t. ie rIc??t.. hnw?der, p.:asible tc! =a. i.!hcr, the re%i\?? r,f t% ~~!~I:~:e?.icibe comei:n; "s.’:rnr:
+ill Put ~.fa csndidate d5-E n~rrecsive from the Comrr..;s:r.. a csmnunicaticm r’ngaroinq tam.* !-Cs\klr at his appii :et:un one month bef6m-e tha cnmlnencment nf the exa?ir.sti.an,
resulr.. F*ilI.;-e. to rainply with this pro’rieJ-m .a111 depriva the candFJate of any claim t5 coP%i.jer-:ItiIn, C:;dmiceion certi-ficates, indicating the Roll Y{.m=s. rrl i
Le  issurd  tn  kha cwdidetss who ars admittea-:  t.z  t!-,e 
examinatior arid thc Tall  No.  indrcated  therr:ir!  rii! be 
the  same as the Pppi icatilm Repistratisr  No.  alrngd:, 

communicated to the candidates ir. their c\c.nowledpement Cards. No candidate rill ba admit.:& tc the examination unless he holds a certificatr c.t admzssion to the examination.
The mere fact that a certificate of admissien t.o the Examinatinn has been issued to a candtdate wzll not imply that his candidatwe has been finally c!sitred by the Commisi.ion. or that the entries made by candidate in his application for the Preliminary €:tarnilration have been accepted by the Commission as tr!ie anu corrrrct. Candidates may mte that the CrJmmission-+ak.es up the verification of eligibility conditi0,ns of a candidate? with reference to original documents, @n?r after t.hi candidape has quelified tor the Civil. :inrvi.:e+ !Ilain! Examinaticv. IJnlesF: zscrlidsture is fcrnra:ii’ ccr,+irmned by the Ccrnmiseion! :c rimtirwes t? be l:-ovraional.
The  dscizion  of  the  Commissicn  as to  the  ~Iic:.5ilit., 
or  otlre~wiarnf a  cmdidate  flr aamiesim  t.12 the  Examinatron 
sha?l 5e f:..naL. 

Candidates anoc!d note that the name in the admissicn certificate. in some csses may be rt;l:?-s~v=ai:sd?lie in teChnical reasons. (‘Lv: !A caadidars must see t%t cormunica?im sen.: tr hin: s.t the address stated in his app!iratiop A:-= relLrectr-r.: if necessar:’ cnange ir, dddresr %hcu:d be c.nmnL!nil:steci Lz-:-,e Commissia:: P’I a I+nq -*lt.r: k> 5
the ~srljest~ppr.irt~~n~t;~ ?if addressed hnetamped envelops gf 1:.5crnn::2?.5cms ei:~. . : .?r;rqr? the Commissicn make. vcr-j effort to t3k.e SCCJL~.~~..rf siicr! chahges, the)’ cannot accept an*/ responsiDillt;# in rhe Ip::tr_er.
(v) Candid;?tes are informed that as the Pra.iimifiary Examination Is only a sc-eening test, no marks sheets will be supplied to successtul or unsuccessful c.rlnaidates acd n3
correspondence will be entertained by the Conmirricm, in this
regard.
IHPORTANT: ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO THE COMMISSION SHOULD
INVARIABLY CONTAIN THE FOLLOWING.PARTICULARS.

1.
NAME OF THE EXAMINATION

2.
APPLICATIPN REGISTRATION NO/ROLL NUMBERIOR THE DATE OF BIRTH OF CAN@ID6lE IF THE AFPLICATION REGISTRATION NO/ROLL NUMEER HAS NOT SEEN C3MMUNICATEDi.

3.
NAME OF CCltuDIQfClrE iPI FULL 4ND IN BUCK LETTERS.

4.
PCSTPL; ~~PDRESSPS GIVEN ir4 rw UPPCIC~TION.

N.B. CPMMUNICAT;qt.IS NO’T COWTAINiNLi THE AROVE PARTICULARS
MAY NaT BE &TIENDED TCi. 9.W:THDRAWAL OF APPLICaTIONS#
NCi REDUEST W I’I’YLWWALOF L3WiDdTLJRE RECEIVED FROM ‘ 3 CPCI@IDPTE CIFTEP HE HRS SCRP!ITTE2 BIS WFLICflTtON Wr1.L 9f EFITERTAINED UNUEP PNY CIRCUPSTANCES.
10. The Unian Public Ser*:ico Comniaaion have hrouqh-. out -3 priced publics*im entitleti "canti;dster Vanual for II.P.S.C, Objective Type E::amlnat;o!+. " This publicakisn is de5ignad ta be of assistance tu cr@spective candidatee Gt U.P.S.C. Examinations or SeIectiom
This Fublicaticn dC also the copi.es uf pamphlets containing rules and the conventional type question papers cf the preceding Civil Services (Main) Examinations are on sale
..
with’ controller of Publications, Civi.3 Lines,D@lhi-llOiT~ and may be obtained trom him direct by Nail Orders or. on .keh
payment. These can also be obtaieed only against cash payment
-545-
from (il the Kitab Mahal, Opposite Yivoli Cinema, Emporia. Building, "C" Block. Saba Kharag Singh tlarg, New Delhi-llOOQ1, and (ii!Sales counter uf the Publications.3ranch a"; Udyog Bhavan, New belhi-JlQ011 and (iiil The Government of India Book Depot, 3, K.S. RQ~Road Calcutta-700001. The manual/pamDhlets are alss, obtolnacle fr-04 the agentc for tT! Governmen? of India pJblications at vartms mofussil towns.
MfiNISF4 MHL BECPETARt UNION PUBLii, SEWICE COkMISKiCM
APPENDIX -‘ I
SECTION I
Plan of Examination
The competitive examination comprises two suczessi*:?.zs::i;a;,:es:
[ i1 Civ?1 Servi ce5 Creliminary E?c&min%.tiaii[ oblect;*re T: ;r 1 for the se:e&;on of candidates for Main E::aminarim, a1.d
(ii) Civi1 Services iPlsin 1 E::aniination (WriktEr. and
Interview* for the selrctim c+ candids.tes fyr the. :.~rrms services and posts.
2. The Preliminarv E::aminatinn rill consist cf tu:-,2acers of Gbjrctive t;’pe (multiple choice qaset~ons~.me carr:! J
maximum cf 490 marks in the subjects srt c!t ir: ~5-section (G! s,f seetio.7 11. This examination is ma;r!it t= serve a5 a scrzening test anly, the marks obtair.-,d i? the Preliminary Examination by thcr candidates who a-s declared qualified for admission to the Main Examination will not br counted for determining their final order of merit. The number of candidatas .ta be admitted to the Rain Examination will be about twelve to thiri:een times the tota approximate number of vacancies to be :’illed in the year in tbe vsrious Services and posts. Only those candidates who we declared by the Commission to hi’re qualified in tne Przliqinary Ew.tmination in a year rill be eligible fG admission to the Main Examination or that year provided tt-.:? ars otherwise eligible for adniissior t:, the Main Examinatim
3 The Haip Examination will cinsisc of a wri+ta.n examination ar.d an interview test. T~E.writtar. ezmm AtLin will consist of papers of ccn\snt~c,i+!..esra:’ type eaa carryinp 330 marks in the subjects Eft nut in rub-sect>an [Ei af’section 11. $150 see Not2 (in) unuor pa”?. I c+ 5actio.i Ii
!B).

4. Candidates whv .,b+.ain ruch minim!?m qc.a:..if>ing ma.-$.: -.:: the w-ittor *ps.r-t9f the ?lain E-::.+.minrtion JP may be fi:.rd b.! the ccmtnissian It their discretian, shall be 5ummonFd ty 7:hem for an intarbi:?c for a Per8onalit:~Test_ .did, suh-sert:.cn "C” of Section :I. Hcrrevar, the pGicm-s ~n I?ir!i.an Lancl.!e.ze+ 3n.j English will be of qualifying nature. Also 5ee ht:u ti:! under psra J of Sectiar: Ii7E). Th.? marxs Gbtsinea ir. these’ papers will not be ca~vtcdtnr rarrr:?.nq. The nirmt?.=r of Candidates to Ijn s.arnmmed far iltCTV:El*! rill be abet;?. t~lc:? the number of vacmeies to be filled. The inter\:letr Mil: carry 230 mark= (with no minimum qualifying perks).
Harks thus obtrined by the Candidates tr the Main Examination (Written prrt. as We1 1 as intervieh would determine their final ranking. Candidates will be allotted
to the various Services keeping in view their ranks in. t.he examination and the preferences expressed by them fx the varipus Services and posts.
Section I1 Scheme and subject for tne Preliminary and Main Exsninaj tions.
A. Preliminary E::aminat;on
..
The examination will cansist cf two papers.
Paper J General Studies i5c) markc
Paper I1 ms subject ta be selected SOU markc.

from the List af optional oubjsct set. Jut 1.n F’ai-a 2 below Tatal: 450 mar*.%
1. List of nptrona? subzscz Agricultu-e Animal Husbandry 81 Vstsrrsnary Scienca .Botsny
~tismistr::
Civil En.lpii?eer:rlq
Commerco
Economics
Electrical Enginaerirg
Geography
Geology
Indian History

Law Hathema t ics Hechmical Engineerinq Philosophy Physics Political Science Psiychology Pub1 ic Rdministrstion Sociology Statistics
zoo19gy Notr ti) Both the quesjtion papers rlli be of the oljec’;:v* type ‘multiple choice quectlonsl . Fur dst.z,.ils iFcludrr!ci sa.moie quection. ol=ase see "r-fcwnatinn tz czndidatee regarding the nbjrcti.de tvpe ai.wstims*’?t RFc.e!idiY 11).
(iib  The  qu*r!.:ion  Eapsra  wi’.l  be  wt bath  :v  Hindi  XI.; 
Eng1i5ll. 
(iii!  The  ccurse content  the  sy?:iqbi  f=r  the uprior?a! 

+ut_roct will be of tho degree lmel. !k?tsils3f the c:~ll*b~.
are indicated ir: Part. FI of Seztion I !Is
(iG)Eac!i paper wil! be af t:uc hm..r’1 ni!retim.

8. Uain Examination The written cxaminatiw will s.?J-eiat of the fz:. lowing p3sci-s
Paper I One of the Indian Lanquagr 300 mark; be selected’by t.he candidate from the languages included in the Eighth Schedule to the Constitution. Paper 11 English 300 marks Papers General Studies 300 marks
111 and IV for each paper
Papers any two subjects to be 500 marks

V, VI selected VII and fr’orn the list @f the optional for each paperVIII subject set out in Dara 2
below. Each subject will have rwo papers. Infarview Test will caryy 230 marks Not. (il The papers on. Indian Languag~s and English +ili be of Matriculation or equivalent standard and wi:.l be o+ qualifyinq nature: the marks cbtainsd ir, these papera wili fiat be counted for ranking
(ii) The papers OR General Studies ~ndOptimal 3rbJects of cnly such candidates will be evaluatad as attain 5bi-n minimum. standard as may be iixed ty ths Commicsxr. in thei? discretion for the qual.;fyinc papers on Indirr :-e113uaqe md English.
iii&! The paper i m Indian I-angciagms ri.11 n@t, however, be compulr-cr; fcr candidates hril Fng +rrm Wwth ExtzrT. States
of Clrunachal Pl-adach .rnipur, rleqhsirva, Mi=ar,am atW .’iaga?and and also fa-candiaetee haiiing from Si!..’,.
the State 5" .m.
(ivl FDr the CsnSuage ;I.’rpers, the script ta be usmi Sy the candidares hill be as under –
Lanquapr Script
Assamese Assi,:;ese Pengali PenCali Gujerati Gujarati Hindi Deranagari
Kannade Kashniri Nalayalam Farathi
Orfya
Punj abi Sanskrit Sindhi
Tani1
Tr1uq.1
Urdu List of optional ccibjects: Clqricu1ture Qnima? Husbanclr? P Ve+-e-?.na,-./ 5ciencs qnthropology Botany Chemistry Civil Engineering
Commerce Andl A.:::%n t,a~?c:.
Econcmics Electrical Engineerinq
Gaography Gec1ogy
Hist.wy
Law Kannrda Persian Malaya lam Devan agar i Orifa Gurmukhi
oevanagai-r Devarapar 1 or Rrabic
Taini 1 TE! upc; Pvwsian
Literature of one of tne,following Languages.
Clesamese, Bengali, Chineee, GujaratL, Hinbi, Kannada,
Kashmiri, Marathi, Nalayalam, Oriya, Pali, PunJabi, Sanskrit,

Sindhi, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu, Arabic, Persian. German, French,
Russian and Engliih
Managernent
Mathematic?.J
Mechanical Engineering
Phi losophv
Physics
Political Science and International Rclstiucs
Psychuloqy

Public Administration
SOCLQ 109:.
Statistics
Zoolog7

Nvte ti1 Cdndiciates will not be allowed to offer the +allowing combinations nt 3~bjecti:
(a)
Political Science and Inter’netiona! Relathn5 enu Pubiic Administratisn3

(b)
Commerce a& Pc=.?l.mtmcr kd Mar~~eaeqi;

(c)
finthrooology and Saciulo~;~;

(d)
Mathcmatics sno Statictics:
(e?Rpr-icul ture an2 Pnimr.: Husbar?lry and Veterinary Science;

( f ) Management and Pub?ic Adminisiraf tm.
(2)
Of tnm E;:c!inrer-ing siJbjects, VLZ. Ci.li: Enpineering, Electrical Engineering an@Mechanic.\i Enginebring -. not more than one SUbJeCt.

(ii)
The question papers for the !$:tamination will be of conventional essay type.

(iii)Each paper will be of three hours duration.
(iv) Candidates will have the option to anmwer all the question papsrs,eneept the language papers viz Paper I and 31 above in any one of the languaqes rncluded in the Eighth Schedule to the Constitut:on C-? in English. (vl Candidates exercising the @stion rn answer papers I11 t3
VIIf in any me of the 1anqLMgos rrrcludsd in the Eig’ith Schedule to the CoriatituJtfm may. if they so desire gave
‘     English version within brackets of on]./ tha deseriotron I?? the technical teTms, if any, 2-addition ta the versiDn in the 1anguage orticd by t!ie.n. Candidates should. however-, not.. that li they misuse th above rule a deductim Hill bo msde 0-this account 1’rom r.h*? total marks etherwise accruing to then and is ext.reme e~e:~. their scriptls) will not. Se %~alued fur beri?p i? i=r! unauthorised mrdium . (vl; The question papers other than language papers wz11 m set both in Hinjdi and EngLish. (vi:) The Ie+ailz,-= ths syllabi are sek nut in Pert B oi Section 111. General (i:Candidates miist rvrita t.he papers in their own band. In no cirzum=tance3, thzy wi!l br alicred tbe :ic-ip of P Ecribe to write the answers for them. (iF)Ths Commission have discretion tB fxx queli?:rinq marma in any or all the subjects nt the examination. (iii)If a candidate’s handwriting is not easly le3isla a deduction will be made on this account from the total marks
otherwise accruing to him.
(iv)Har4s will not be allatted for mere superfic.ja1 know1edge.
(*,)Credit will be given tar orderly effective and c::isc$ expression combined with due ecanomy of words in all r.d-jacts ot the examination.
(vij In the qucztion pwer’s, wherever necessary qurstmns involving \he Metric System of Wsiqhts and measurzs or!l:, will be set.
!vii)Candidate= should use nv1:t Intcrnitimal form c" Indian numerals (1.e. z..:..?. 5.6. st-z.1 Nhila snswcrir.l: ad.e?jtien
papers.
(-8iii)Candioates are permitted to %ring afi:! i’r,..: ?ntrstr? aperated prr.cl.et ci; cuiatm-s for conrsnt;ona; ?IO~ type papers only. i-csr,irg ar .inter-chongimq of eaicin: .:Q< E ?..I ZPZ k;iaminatr.r.n H%!I is cct permittPd.
It. is a!so imc?r+.ant to ;rct= +hz: candida’.er Ei-B qni pqrmittEd ta use ca!cul ator @’Pr 3ns:>erm6 ce-er’_j.vn t;*$:k 2apers ITe5t Pao!–lct=). Thew shaisid Cc? the—?+Qrg:ri-,q tee ‘.;doe Lnsidc the E::aminaC.irJn Mai 1,
C. Intrrvfaw Test
The canididatewil I te interviewd CY a Zcarr? !–h<.:b: 1 . ..kavr before them a rrccrd of tiis Carezr. HP w’l! .:.i .~rkcr! questions on matters of gensrai intur-ect. The aS.ier–51 the interview is to assess the persons1 auitab:.:it-: ::t the candidate far a career in public rerr ce by B Board of competent and unbiased observers. The test is ir-tended to judge the mental ca?ib-e of a candidst.9. In br~aeterm= this
is really an assessment of not only his irrtellectual qualities but also social traits end his interest in current affairs. Some of the qualities to be Judged are mental alertness, crst?ral powers of assimilacion, cIFL.!~an.d logical exposition, beiance cf jl~dgement, Yariet-. and depth o4 interest. CbiLity for social cohecjion and lardrrrhip.
intellectual and mnral integrity.
SECTION I11

SYI ISEI FOR THE EXABINPTJON PART A-PRELIHINARY EXClMINAfION
COBWLSORY SUEU’ECT
QENERAL STUDIES (Code NO. 90) The paper nn General Studies will rnr:llaJe mestir3::a co.,ering the fcllnwing fields of I edge:
K~OW
Gcneral Drienca
Currrr t e\fen ta of nrt ona: end irnksrnat
History of India.
Ucrld Giacqraphy.

Ouesticps an Senera1 Scciencz 411 cover gsnaral apprmciiticw
and unr;wetanding r,f ociel~ce.i;ic!.udLnq s;ittars .z+e-;st-y da;.
observation and e-perienri, 3% msy be expected of a well
educate.? perem wF.0 has pot made u special atla.?:. af any
scianti+ic discipline. I!? HlEtQr? emnhasis wi!l br :n zrz.-.j
general undsi-atandzng cf t-e rub:ect .~nits soclal I c.c?rm
and pOlLtlCd! aspect3. In &mgr.aphy emphasis will oe nn
Geogr~tph:#of India. G~icetirJne In the iieography of Icoia will
remts tc physical. -=cia1 2nd c-eonomic Geoqraphy of t.he
countrx, includfnq the mail? fEntures nf Indian apricu! tu-ai
and natural resources. Questions on Indian Polity anC E.-onomy

will tesr knowledge on the countrv’s political syntem panchayati raj, community de\elopmen..: and planning in ‘Lndia Questions on the Indian National *16\’.?rnsnt will relate t-cr the nature and character of ‘the ninotrsnth century resur-Smce growth of nationalism and attaintment of Independence
OPTIONCIL SUSJECTS
Coae Nos. (gi;en in bracK@tr; to be used in +i?iq !ig ~hrt application form.
fnnctians. crc;urrence anl cyclimg ir! se.)i :s cr:i?tiFicg+ c.f soil fertility and its ert.luation fcr .iLidicrtxis fsr-tiit :c.-use. Organic manures and bin-fertilize-r. ctrsipht, compir and mixed fertilizers manu* rcturcd and ir:m-ket?G .in Cndia. Principles of plant phye-icllayy witk reference tc plant
nutrition, absorption translocation and metabolism r,yf nutrients. Diagnosis of nutrient deficiencies and their rmelioratim photosynthesis and respiration, growth and development auxins and hrmanes in plant growth. Elements af Genetics and plant breeding as app1irr.r tc improvement of croi?c-: Uevelapment nt plant hybrids and compositias, importatnt varietieE, hybrids and ccmcosiries of major crme.
Important fruit and vegtabl+ c;-opc of India, the :.z~.:L.a-p cf practi=es and their scientific basisi, crag :-o+atisns,
intcrcropoing and c=!inpanion cxps, mle CI+ :*"uitz ad vegetables in human nutition: pcet h3r~est >.me: &nq S~G processin.g of frliits and veget.ables.

aeriou+ yf?st? am aiseassa ?..fisxting mijar ci-ips. P.-;;:cic.~’i~ nf pest. canrr-1: integr-died cntrnl sf pest5 ~:-:.1 dice=sE=j ?roper use aria maintenmce of nlant. protectien ocuipnints. Principles of sc?nomi.ce as ApplisQ te ~g~~.r-!lt.dr:.
.

Faran plannir.9 and rpsi~~:t-c;’.nan;qemen :: .for ~pt,i:..: i?~c1?1:,–.~..2r-. Farming z#s.*ams snd their role ir, regi@.?aIecewmcs. Philoephy &jectF’c.es ana principies c:’ e:.Lecs:on, €cte?;i:.? @rqanisat.-m at. the State, Dicb.rict and r?’.zcC: !e.rclr–‘-e–structure. fluirrtisns. ~or:reepmsibi iitie?. F::?t+cds .:,f commimicntior!, Role 0.f farm orpan.isat.ions 19 c;:+.cn::art service.
BOTANY (Code No. 02)
CHERIBTRY (Cade No. 03)
SECTION CI
Atbmic number, Eiect.:’omic Cor;figuratim OT e’ementa, Rufbau principle. Hurr.’l’s MultipliCitY Pu1.r.. P.v.~li’s Ezclucion Principle, lomq tarm d thP Periodic C1assilicst.ien ct: elements, Sal.iaiit Characteristrcs of ‘5’ ‘p’ ‘+’ and *f
Werner’s theories of coordination compounds and types Of isomerism in &and 4-coordinate compie::es. role eat coordinatron damwnds in nature, common metaliurgicgl ad anaiy ticai operations. Structura.j cf diborname, sluminium-chloride forrecnne al~~.yl magnesium haliderr. dicholrodiamine platinum ard ‘Bran chloride. Common ion effect. solubility Drqduct a;id their aqpliuatirms in qualitztirs inarganic ans.?ys:s.
butane -2,3 -diolgeometrical isomerism of rnaleic 8nd furnaric acids, E and 2 notation of geometric~lisomFrs. Carbohvdratee : classif iczttion and general reartiomz stlarctures of g! ucmse, fructose and acm-ose, gene-?.l inlea QI-! the chemistr:/ of starch =!xicsllulqse. Benzene and common tnanofunctiona1 ben.:ancid c~m~ounds concept of aromaticity as applied .to be.n:ene, naphthalctie and Dyrrolr nrientation in f!urnce in aromatic sub%titution Chemistry and UF~Sof eiazmrrur salts a Elementary Idea uf the caemistry cf nilo. fate, prr.’..e;m are vitamins -their ro!e in cutrition arid >.ridustry. Basic principle5 rmderiyirrq spectrai tschnlques ICI’J-vi-zioles
IR, Raman and ?!W!
SECTION C
Kinetic theory of gases and gaE laws. Msxwell’s law of distributron of -…elocitiee. Van der kesla equat:Lcrn. Law Ef corresponding stetec. Spectfic heat of pasee, rc..tio CQ/C./. Thermodynamics : the +irst law Gf thirmodynamics,
Isothermal and rdiebat.ic erpansions. en Lhalp), heat capacities and thermochsmistry . Heats of resctien. Calculation of bond energies. Kirchatf’s eguation. Criterij for spontaneous changes. Second Ian 0-t thermodynamics. Entrdpy., free eaergy, Criteria tor chemical equilibrium. Solutions: OsmoCis pressure. Lowering of vapour prerjsure depcession of treezing point and elevation of boiling poinr.
Detirrinatfon of mclreular wisight in solution. LIssocirtion
and di6SOCfdtiOn of solutes.
Cheitnieal equilibria I Law of mass actiQn and its application
to homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria1 Le Chrtelier
principle and -its applicatim to chemical equilibria.
Chemical Kinetics : Holscularity and order of a reaction.
First order and second order reactions. Temperature
coefficient and energy of activation. Collission thQry of
reaction rates qualitat.ive trrstment of theory of activated
complex.
Electrochenistr! Farndv’s laws of electrolysis,
conductivity of an slectrol?te Eaoivalent conductivity and
its variation with dilhtion. SG1lJbilit.9 uf sparingl? soluble
sa1ts. Electclrtie dissaciatrm . 0stwslde dilution law,
anomalv of itrong elactrolyt.ss. Solubility product. Skrength
of acids and hasps. H:*d?ol:<sis of saits. !?ydraeen izn
concentration. Blrffer action. Theory nf indicators.
Revetsible csl :e : Stanrfs.rd hyercgen :wd calamai elscttodes.
Redox pntenfrala. Concentration cells. Ionic pruduct D+
water Fotsntiometric titrztiocs.
Phase Rule. Explanation Df terms involved. ApDlication to
one and two componenat systems’. Distribution law.
Colloids : Beneral natur-e of collodia? solutions and tnsir
classification. coagulation. Prctective actinn and Gold
number. Adsorption.
Catalysis : Homogenous and heterogeneous CatalySiS.
Promoters and Pgieons.

Statics : Coplanar and multiplanar system; fres bcay diagrams, centrDid; seccnd moment of plane figut.e, fcree and funicular polugnna; princr2le of virtyal w0a-x ~:\!SCO~E
ioii
systems and catenary.
Dynamics : Units and dimensicns; Gravl’tatioval am! absol~te
systems; llKS dr S.K.Units.
Kinematics : Rectilinear and Curvil:.flear-m.Jt-ioil rs:.iT.i’de
motion: instantaneous centre.
Kinetics : Mas= moment of inertia; simple hesrnunic motion.
momentdm and impulse: eqiizticn of antion of d rAqif boiy
rTtating rbout R fixel axis.
Strength Gf 9atarials : Honogeneok lrnd i%otropii. mvti~.
stress and strain ; elastic =mstants; tension an::
compression in .me directi.cn riveted and weld+? joints .
Compounds stresses -Principal stresse3 ar.d princlae,
strains; simple theories ot failure.
BendinQ sornents and shear fwce diagrams. Therrry of be-idim?
shear stress dirtrib-Ition i~ crcso-section of be.il?n
deflection of beams. analysis of l.ei?llnared ba3nc &r!d . non-
prismatic structures.
Theories of columns; middle-third and middle fm,r.th ru1.e~.

Thre6 pinned  qrch,  analysis of  simple frames.  Tut-si.;n  OF 
shafts;  combined,  bendiog;  direct and torsinnal  stress  in 
shafts. 

Strain Energy in elastic defurmation: impact .+ntigue and
creep.
Soil Mechanics : Origion of soils. Clascification void rztio.
moisture content premeability : ?r?mpactinn.
Seepage; construction of flow nets. Determinatiori of shear
strenght parameters for different drainage nne 5tres;s
conditions -Triaxisl. uncontined and direct shear-‘rssts.
Earth pre5sure theories -Hanliine’z and Cuulemh’s .anal,./tical
and graphical methods; stability of 5lor;ez. Soil
consolidation -qerzaghi’a theory for one dimensiqnal
consolidati.on !-‘ate of cettlement and ultimate: settIenent.
effective st.rscs pressure distributron in snilc-. cni!
stabilization, Fnmdati ons-Bea:~.ria capa[Ii t_ y of

footinq,pi1es WE 11I. 5hee+ p1 19s.
T1.i.ii.d Mechani.cs : Fvoi3erties of F iuidr,.
Fluid 3b+:ic?~-Frorsure at a pnint: :cv:? ,311 o!ane and
ccirvea sarffares. bvoyanc./ .–ctsbilt~;>+ tlnatina and
xibmerqed bcdic-z.. $d:/awic+ c’. i!L,:>i Flew-i-amin2.r and
turbulent flow: Eqciati.on of c<w.int>.~.:n~+:: cper7y ?.nd mom~n?:~.m
equation; Sernoii.! 11:; theorem: ;a~:itatl~ri.
‘Jelocit?, pot.~n+isl an4 s?.ream f:..inc~.~cn:-ro;a:ion<~l. and
Irrrjtat;mli?Sl fl~w: bo~t

measurement.
D1 men5 ionel. 1 an3I. ,.’c.iE -:In 1t5 and dImens j..or?c–nur!-d ImenFIc)na1
nuin bers : EL!.cC:i!-, 2ham’ 5 pi -tlitxrmn !:,’ -i1-1 cj p1ez; ,T.f
~
and appl cation.
Viscous Slow-flow between stafic p1i;te circular tubes :
boundary 1e)ler concepts: draq and li.ft.

m:.s
Incmpresslblo flow through pipes-Laminai and turbulent flow critical velocity; friction loss; loss due to sudden
enlargement and contraction energy grada lines. 
Own channel flow-  riniform,  and non-uniform  flows;  spacific 
energy  and critical d’@pth:  gradually varied  flow;  stir-face 
profiles;  standing wave flume.  Surges and waves. 

Surveying : General pr~nciples, sign conventipn?; SUP-veyinp instruments and their adjustments recordinn of svrvey observations; plotting of maps and ~cctions; eri-ors and their adjustments. Measurement of distances, rtirectjocs and heights: correction to weasured lungth md Labr’ings; correct ion fr.r 1iics.1 Q t t ra ct ions, fneaX’-Irement r)-‘ hc..r1ion ta 1 and vertical enqler; level ling 0perati:ms; refraction .mi curvature c~rrections. Chain and campass survey : t.trendG1ite and taecF.eomc+.t-i:: traversing; tr-rvet~e computation: o1ine tPole xnel!: solution of twa ind three points problems; ccntour murvev.j.r\q Setting out directions and gr-ade~, t/pes cf curves. setti.;;? out ot curves and euecavPtion lines for building faurmdati.enc,
COMMERCE (Code No. 03)
PCIRT I :CICCOUNTINO Accounting equation-Concepts and Conventions. Bl?r.er .I: 1:. accepted accounting principles-capital and rwienuE expenditures and receipts-preparation OY the -f insnciai statements including statements of sources and rpplicatron CIS funds-Partnership accounts including dissolution a2.d piere
meal distribution among the partners- Accounts of non-orafit
orpanisaions- Preparhtion of aceaunt* from incomplete records

-Campany CIccountr Issue and redemption of shares and debenture%- Capitalisation of profits and issue of bmur shares- Accounting of eepreciaticn includinp acce!e..rated methods of providing eeprxiation-lnvcntwv vr1uati:m and
control .
Ratio analysis and interpretation- Rat:oe relating to #snort- term liauidity. long term solvency ar?d profitahi!ity -irnprotsnes of the rate of t-ct!nrn C-I investment (F:L?:) in evaluationg the cwBra1l perfzrnance Q? a bitsine% ec’-*-?:#. Nature and objects cf auditing-Balance Cheer and cm+iwc’.:j audit -Statutery management and opr-tiDn-i!, a.ir?ita -Ruditor’E work ii:9 papers-Interwl conr-z.1 3l:j interns1 rludit- Audit of proprietcry .and partncrahip f irm5-3riad outlines cf the com~anyaudit.
PCIRT 11: BUSINESS ORGCINISNION RND SECRETARICIL PRCICTICE
Distinctive Features of different forms af 3:swZes* organisatinn. Formalities and documents in f loeking :I Jo: rtt Stack Company -Ooctrine of indoor tnanagemer?t an.:! C~ifiC~~l= of const-uctivc nntice- type of securtics and roetkdr of their issua- Economic FunctAons of the new issues market a-G Stock exchange-Business combinations-Control of mon@ccly houses-.Problems of modernisation of industrial enterprises. Procedure and financing of export and import tr-ade-Incmntivcs tor export promotion-Role c:f the EXIM Bank-
Principles of insurance, Life, tire and marine. Management functions I Planning orgmisrtion Statting directing, coordination and contrdl. Orgmisation structure :Centrllisation and decentralisation. delegation of authority, span af Control, Hanagernent b; objective ( M.B.0, and Management by eeception. Off ice Management: Scare and principles-Sfstems and routines-Handling ilf rocords-Office equipment and machines Impact of Orpanisation and methcdr. (!J&l!!. Company Sccrstery : Functions and scope-Appointmpnt, qualifications rnd Jinqual Lfications-Rights, duties and libailites of company secretary-Draft.ing of sgenda and minutes.
ECONOMICS (Code No. 06)
PCIRT I
1. National Economic Accountinq : Natipnal Income Anaiysis. Gemeration and Distribution 09 Income and related aggregates
Gross National Product, Net National Product, Gross domestic Prcduct P* Net Domcstic Product (at.market prices arid factor costs): at constanr and current prices.
2.
Price Theor;. : Law of demand; [Jtility analysis and Indifference curve techniques, consumer equilibrium; Cost Curve and their relationship; equilihrium’ of a firm under different market struc.tures; pieing of factors of Production.

3.
Money 4 Banking : Dmfinitions and functions of money (Mi

H2 -3); Crrdit creation# Credit scurees, cmts and
availability; theories of the Demand’for mcney.
4. Intrrnrtion Trade : The theory of comparative costs; Richardian and Hoekscher-Qhlinj the balance oT payments and the adJus-tment mechanism. T*a.de theory and ecpnomic growth and development. PCIRT I1 Ezonomic growth and dsvrl3pment :’ Meaning and meacuremnt: characteristics of underdevelopment; rate and pattern. Modern Economic Brouth. Ssurees of growth distributron and qrowth; prnblems of qrowth uf developing ec~nomios. PCIRT I11 Indian Ecznomy I Indian 5 economj oince Indepmdonce: trends
in pgpulation
19::: growth since
Pcpulation *no poverty;
general trends in national Income and related agreeqates: Planning in Inaia; Ubjertives, strategy and rate and aattern of growth; problems cf in0instr.ialisation strategy; Rgricultura: growth since Independence with Ioecial reference to toodgrains: ucemployment; nature of the prgblarll and possible Eoi.ution; Public financ.s and Economic Folicy.
ELECTRICAL ENQINEERING (Ccdm No.07)
Primary and secondary cells, Pry accumlatw-s Solar Cells, Steady statr analysis of d.c. and a.c. network; network
theorems1  nrtowrk functions,  Laplace teehniquhs,  transient. 
respone;  frequency  ~esponse;  three-phare  neworks8 
induetive 1 y coup’l ed circuits. 

Mathematical modellinq.of dynamic linear systems, transfer
functions,block diagrams; stability of control systems. Electrostatic and magnetostatic field analvsis; Maxwell’s equations. Wave equations and ‘elmtromaqnetic waves. Fasic methods at measurements, standards. error analysis.
indicating instruments, cathoderay osci1lascope, measurement of voltage: curreot; gowrr resistance, iod{ictancn. capacitance, freqi-oenc:,, time and flu:.:; electrnrlic meter-,. Vacuum based and Semiconductor del~-FS and anal:!sir of electrcinic Circu!.tr: sinqle and m8.l.l tiztage audio. avd raido
~
small signal ai-:#; large sign31 amplifiers: oscillators -alic feedhpck imal ifiero: wa.,,esh.3pl-n? circLiL% and time b,?x
g rner ators,
mu1.t3. ,/ibrators and digita1
circuIts:
;,<,motiu1
1c.:-:

and drmod~!la.t~ori c.ir-cl-!its ‘:!-.aiismis.;ion %ineat a~rdin. -a
I
ztnG  il.H.  irequGrir-ie?. .YFr,?  and Hairln communication. 
G~w~er-?.i:.~mizf  9.m.  t.  and  Ir,Jrque in rr.tatirsc machine.  cct.-..-
and  Gqcneratrir  ,._t-,ara~teristr,_~of  d.c.  s:,nchranol.is  ;nd 

itidiiction -nachines e~i.!.IVM 1enIr c~r-u ita: crimrnu k .+.c irm starters: phaser-diagram. Isrsse5I reg!) lation; :?ewer transformers. Modelling of transmission 11ni.s. stead:. , state and tt-ansient
.ctz~bii1.t;). SLITQE? phenomena 3fid in%i:.Iat.ion coord ..n +tion;
protective device:. and ochL+m?-+for power-.system eau: rme-.t.
Cun.dersion of a,.<. to d.c. and d.c. to a,c. cont,–ol:sif arid
uncontrolled power-. speed coctr-ol techniquas for dri-;..:.
Section CI : Seneral Principles: .’ i1 Ph:esicei Gecyraphy
ii> Human geography ii1i1Economic qaogriphy !LV! Cartoqraphv !v! Daveiopmrnt of geographical t.hcupbt. Sectinn 0: Ssographv Gf C-hs Wor!..3: (ij World landfcr-ms, cliea+-as,SCIJS x.d vcgetatrun. !ii: Natural regions of the wor!d !iii)WGrld popi~lstirn. distrlbutlon md growth: raeoi mankind and int+i-nat:cra: migrati-ins: zultural rsalme Gf world.
(ivl Wnrld agricultue, fishinn an& fr.-ectry rrnerals
enrrpy rssoiwces: world industrmc.
fv) RYgsonal stud!: 0′ Pfrica. 5mctr,:-r.ast &L* 5.W. $5

Rnglo-Qmsrsra. U.S.S.3. and China.
Section C : Gelgraphs of India
( il Phuniuqraphy; <:1i!nater ,;oils end veqetztion.
I.ii! Irr-iCat-ioo and aqrici~lture;fnrestv and fisheries.
iriz )Mir?erals atid ~r.ergyresm’zee.

(iv)
Industries and industrial dsve!opmcnt

(v)
Ponulation s:rd settlements

OEOLWJ (Cod. NO. 09)
PCIRT I
(a) Physical G@qlogy : Solar system and the Earth Crioin,
P~A and internal constitution nf rarth. Weat-hering,
Geolngical work of river lrhe. glacier, wind 5ez a~d
groundwater. Vn1canoiis-types dis tribu tim. geoloqical
etfect.e and pradiicts: Eert.hqua4ss-distribution causes and
effects. Elemental-v ideac about pessynclbnei. is@r,;3sv srd
mouctain buildiny,’ c-ntinenta? drift, SeJ*lZCr-c3rzsdinq’ and
placr tectonics.
!bj Geomorphology ; I?asic concerrts ~f geomo-ph.llogy. Norns:
c./cle .zt erasic?. dr-ninaqi usttrrns. Lnnr?:m-ms rm-med bv
,i:z, w~ndand w;a+?*.
!c) Btructura.! and Field Ecology : Clincmetfw csmE)aEE and its
use. Primary and secendiu-v. structures, Repressntz>tiine.:
altitude: slape: strirc 2nd diD. Eftectc of topcrgrapr.:. or*

-.
nut-crop5. Folds. Fsc;l*C-uncanformities-and .JQints -thisr description, c?assiticati@n, rscognitien in the field sr.< their rfferta an rxtcr’ops. Criteria ?or the dstc*-%inztlm~,i: the order of ecpe?-positinn in the field. Neppes end Geolocjical windms. Elementary ideas of gcol~gic=l survF,* and mapping.
PRRT XI
(a) Crystal largraphy :Crystalline and emQrphous rubst.incosj.
crystal, its definition and morphological characteristics;

elements of crystal structure. Laws of Cryrtallorgrapn;?Symmetry elements of crystals belonging .to nwmal elaEs of seven Crystal Systms. Crystal habitm and twinning.
(b)
Mineralogy : Fl-anciples of optics. Behaviour of liph? through Isotropic. and anisotropic substances. .Petro:ogical microscupr; construction and working of Nicol Prism,. Birefringence: Pleochroism? extinction. Phvsical, chemical and cptica? promerties of more cgmmon rnckforming minerals r.)f following grmps; quartz. fsidspar, mica, amphlbole. pyroxene, olivine. garnet, chiloFite and carbonate.

(c)
Economic Geology : Ore, 0r.z mineral and qanpue, actline of the PrncesseE of tarmation and cl’assiiication c?.: ore deposits. Srinf study ai mode of occurrence. orgin. distribbt;.cn Ibn India) and economic IJS~S of the fellaking; Geld; ores o iron, mmgnanese ctiromiiam, copper. al.minium, lead and =ice mica, gypsum, magnesite and kysnite. diammd:

coal and !3e%role.~m.
PRRT I11
Petrolopy
!a) Igncmre Petroiogy : Maqama-its composiior and ratc.re,
Crystnlli::ation of Magma. differentiation and asslmiiatdor .
Powen’s r.:+cion p-inciple. . Te::ture and structure of i.zneoiis
rocks. Mode 0;. occ.1rrrence and mineraiog:n of iq?reousrock:,.
Classification and varieties of igneous rocks.
t b) Scdimentary Petrolngy : Sedimentar!# proce%s and
products. An outline classification ot sedimentary rock€.
Important primary sedimentary atructc~.rrs ibedding crQss

bedding, graded bedding. ripple marks, sole rtructures. parting lineation). Residual deposit: their mode of fnrmation. ch~rctsristics and important types. Classic deposits. their classification, miner31 composition and texture. Elementary k.now!edge of .the orx~in ~nd characteristics rjf nciarfi arenitec, drknsss end gre-wackec. siliceous and .:alcnreous depnsits of chemical and oryan.ic origin. (c! Yetamcrpnic F’etrolo~y: Def:nition, ager?i:E 8, types o.f metamorphisms. d istinyulshinq character-; 0.f metamornh’:: roci:s. Zones, grade.; nf meternorpt,ir-3 rnct-5. Te.:tiir-e and structirre of metamnrphic rocis. 3i-15.i5c.T cI.~sc.~:5icati~7n
c7f metamct-phic u-o~L:?,, dezcrication
Br~st ~~?t_i-cti~a~171,: zi qLl.artlzite, ~l?.tt:. %ct?lzt..;PO~.YZ. marb!? .irid tizt-tlf,?lz.
PART IV
(a) F’alaenntnlt,q\/ : fossils. cc.ndidtionn ?c,r rntcrnbent. types of pre.z-ervat.inn mc? uaec,. Drna.6 m.-lr-pl.io!opical features and geologic.al distrihutinn nf bcachiopodr. bivalves (lanellibrao-rhes! , gaatrc?pc!ds. cephalopcds. b.rLlobi t?r, echinoj.ds and crjrals. G brief stc!c;y of Eondwana 71.2ra and Siwalik mammals. (b! Stratigraphy : Fundamental laws of stra%igraphy. Classifica.tion of the stratified rock5 into groups. %,:sterna and series etc. .mdclassifcation of geologic time intc eras, periods and epochs. an outline Geology of India and a brief
stud;. of the +allowing systems with respect to their distribution. lithology. fossil interest and economic Lmport.+vce. if any. Dharwar, Windhyan, Gondwana .% S~waliL.
INDIAN HISTORY (Code Mo. 10
Section ‘G
1.

L.
..
._. .
4.
5.

6.

5.
The Mrrghal Empire (1556–170-7!. MvShaf. pality: agrarian relations, art. at-chltecture and CLiltLire Lnder the Mughals.

6.
Beginning of E!.!ropean commerce.

7.
The Maratha !f.inqdcm and Confederacy. Sectifin C

1.
The deline of the MciohaI ErnFire. thr? <butcnomou:: with special reference to Pengal. kysore md Punj.3.h.

2.
The East India Company and the Eengal Nawsbs. .T. Hritish Ecmom2.r Imzact in India.

LAW (Code No. 11)
L. Qarninic+r>.ti~,o
!L~.w :
1. Nature and Scrpe oi Rdm;nirtrative La.rr.
i1. De1eqated !Legi5IatL;zn: !1.) Rs di’$::tinqi.iished frcm Adrnin::t–at..-,c. power (ii!Factors lea..rfiiig to it3 growth. (iii! FiestrL:tintc c.n delegatizr-8.
iii.Control Judirial and Legislative
iv.
Principles of natural justice and tairnec-a

v.
Ombudsman and CVC

vi. Public undertakings
3.7

vii. Administrativm agencies and tribunals
-l Constitutional Law of India I Salient feautres of the rndian Constitution; Preamblri Directive Principles of State policf; Fundamental Rights: !&dement31 Cctties. Par1 iament President and his powers; Union and State; Judiciary; Emergency provisions: Amendment to the Conrititution.
3.
Law nf,Contract : General Principle!: of the Cantract offer, sccentafica consideritions; cap:acity to contract. Breach of contract, Quasi-contract (Ss.1 to 75 of the Indiarr Confract Act. 1872).

4.
International Law ? ‘Natwe, De’ei’inition, sources c+ International Law,Vis a Via .Mr*nicigal !-aw. State Recogni tirm and United Natmns Dr)anisacion, ieternational CoCirt of Justice, i.! M C!ia!-re* end H4~rna1-Rights.

3. Torrs and Cr.ilneE kfiritim of T~rtand Grlrne! Nst~r-~ and Extr!;t of Tortius and Criminsl L-ability. L’icar:Lo~tn Liability and State L.iabil’.tc. Princi9:es of Jaint Lidbri;t>, Oenera.1 Defences and Exceptions under law cf Torti sn3 Crribs.
MCITHEMATICE (Code No. 12)
Algebra : Sets, relations, equivalence relstiono. "ieturz.’. numbers, integers Ratiunal numbers, Real and complex r:u?iF;e-s, division algorithm, greatest cmmon divisor, polynsrnra i s. division algcrrifhm, aerivations, Inteqral.rationa1, rod?.and complex roots of a pol:~nomial, Relation between rooks and
Coefficients, rmpeated foots, el.cnent8ry symmetric functions, Oroupr, rings fields and their elementary properties. Matrices: Addition and multiplication elementary row and
column opertion,  rank determinants,  inverse,  solutions  of 
system of linear equations. 
Calculus  :  Real  numbers,  order  completeqesa  property, 

standard fucntions, limits, continuity, properfies ~f continuous functions in closed intervals, differentiability, Mean value Theorem. Taylors Theorm, Maxima anti ?lir?Ima. Appliation to cut-ves-tangent normal properties, C!rvh:t.ire, asymptotes double points points of inflexion and trar:?-r.q. Drfinit.on nf a definite intnqral of cnntinueur firr:ticJn as the lrmt of a ‘sum, fundamental theorem of integral I;alculus. rnethode of integration, recti+ication quadrature, volums end surface of solids ef revnlution. Partial differentiation and its applicsrion. Simple Tsst. of convergence of series of porltivcr terms, alternirwq series and absolute convergence. Dif+ehntisl Equations: First order di+ferenr.-al equations. Sinqular solutions geometrical interpretations, linesr differential equarions with constant. c0cf:icients. Geometry ; final.ptic Geometry of etra:ght lines and conic; rsferred tm Cartesian and polar Cew-dinates; thrr.5 dimensional geometry for planes, rtrainght lines, zhphers, Cone ma Cylinder. Mechanics I Concept of particle, lmnlna, rigid body! dieplacment, force, mass, weight, concept of scalar and vector quantities, Vector Algebra, Combination arid
equilibrium of Copalanar fwces, Newton’s Lows of motion motion of a particle in a straight line; Simple Harmonic notion, projectile, circular motion, motion under central. farces (inverse square lnwl, escape velocity.
MECHCINICCIL ENGLNEERINQ (Cod. NO. 13)
Statics : Simple applications cf equilibrium equations :
Dynamics :.himple applicatfens 09 equations ot motion. Simple
haracnic motion. work energy, power.
Theory of Machines I 5impla examples of ?.inks and mechanism.
Classification of gears. standards gear tc!cth pr!JfiIe$?
Classificatian at trearrns. fmctinn of fly whEe1. types at
governmrc;. Static and Jyamic balancing. Simple eranples of

I.
vibration of bars. Whirlin9 of shafts.
Mechanic= ?I+ Solids : Stress, strain, Hcok’s L~W. elastic
modulii, bending mn,mnts and shearing foce diaprams for
beams. simple bending and torsion .~fbeams sprjnts,
thin wa Lled cylinders Mechanical praperties and meter…r r:
testipg.
Manufacturing Science : Mechanics af metal cutting. tc.21
life. economics of machining. cutting tool materir,ls. Biisic
machining procssses, t;’pes at machine tools, transfe? 1:-nes,
shearing, drawing, spinning, roll ing forging, b::tritsion.
Different types of casting and welding methods.
Praduction f’lanagRment : Rsthod and time study, motion economy

and work space design, operation and flow process charts.
Product design and cost selection of manufacturinq process.
Break even anal:(cl:s. Site selection, p!.ant layout.. Matorials
handliqq, select?.on of equrpment for jr2.b shcrp and ma55
production Schadt.!i ing .despatching routing.
Thermodynamics : Heat. work 3qd temperature. Firs: and =ecord
laws af thermod,:namics Carhot, RanC.ine, Cltt~ and 5iere1
Cycles.

Fluid Mechanic5 : Hydrostatics continuity ectuatior,.
Hernoul lia tlierirbiri. FIaw thrc?c!i;h pipes. cliszhlarqe
meescirsment.. Lan:inar 3.71 Tiur!xlent. flow, Concept Q? boundary/
1dyer.
Heat Transfer : One dhenrionai s-tesciy 2t;it.e consuction
through walls &d c *-der=. F:ns. k::cepk nf thet-;n-,1
boundat-:/ 1a;rer. :leat trarsfer ccuffI.c::i sr-: t c.zrrbl?r;d he :+ ::

I
transtar , coeff st. He.?? ei:cS?.nqers
I
Energy conversion : Comprsfciun <and %par’,.. igriit:.:~~engines.
PHILOSPHY (Code No.14)
i. Logic -symbclic I-oaic sylloc~ism and fallacies,
mathematics1 Logic, Truth Functinnal Logic.

ii. Histot-y ef Indian EthLcs : Source, Types. Mesning of
nharma: Ethiccc-and t1etaph:ysi~::~: 3nd Karma and Freewill;
Karma and 5yana:

iii. History nf Mestern Ethics: Moral Et.anderds ~~idgement.
Order an6 prGgrezs : EthiTs and Ematrvisn: 3etrrm;nism and
Freewi 1:: Crime and F’.ir.is.r!meint !ndiv1ji.ia1. and Srci.etr.
LV I iiisi:gt-,y of P!Tilnzph:—‘-el-n : ;!-,d!..3.n i~t-thodo?: 1ndla.n

XCA.~
Heterdn::.
FHYSICS (Code No. 15)
2. Waves L Oeillations L Simple harmmic motion. travelling C Stationary waves, supe*pcsition of waves, Beats. fcrced oscillationa, Damped oscillations, Resonahce, sound haves,
Vibrations  of air columns,  strings  and  rods.  Ultrrsonrc 
waves and their applications Doppler effec t. 
3. Optics  : Matrix  method in paca::ial  optics:  thin  iem 

formulae nodal planes, systems of two thin lenses, rnromatic and spherical aberration, Optical instrumentsI E;#ep.eces, nature and propagarinn of Light, Int4ference divisor: cr.f wavefront, Division of amplitude, Simple inte-fermetsrc. diffraction -Fraunhoter and Frcenel. Grntinys. Rescl\.inq power of optical mstruments, Payleigh criterion, Folari:ation, Prodcnctim and betecticn 0.f polarized 1..qht. Ra;)leigh Scatter-i.ng, Ramsn Scetkwivq Lsssrs and iho3.r appl’ications .
4.
Thermal Physics :Thermometry law5 of thermedynamirz. *ear. engines, Entrop tnermodynamic potentials and Fla>:w:?ll~’.= relations. Van dcr Waals’ equatim ot State, ‘:!-L?~TI! constants. Joule-ihnmson effect. Phass transition, Trsi?aocrt phenomenon, heat conduction and sgeciiic heat ia sollde. Kinetic theory af Gases, ideal gas equation , W=>:ws.l! ‘ -velocity dj.strihution9 Equipartition of Energy, Elear fret-path, Brownian Motion black-body radiation Plank’s Law.

5.
Electricity and magnetism I Electric charge, Fields and potentials. Coulomb’s law. Bauss Law dapacitiance, Dielectrics. Ohm s Law, Kirchoof’s Laws. Magentic field. ampere’s Law. Faraday’s Law of Electromagnetic induction,

Lenz’s Law. Alternating Currents. LCR Circuits, Sari-& Parallel resonance Q-toctw, ThermocLectric eftects and their applications. electromagnetic Waves. Motion of charged particles in electric and magnetic fields Partic1u accelerrtcrr, ‘den de Graff. generator, Ciclotron, Betatron, Mass Spectrometer, kk11 effect. ilia, Para and ferro magnetism.

6.
Modern Physics t Sohr s theory of Hydrogen atom, ODkiical and X-ray spectra, PhOtOelQCtf.iC effect. Compton effect, wave nature of matter and Wave-Farticle dual itv, Netural ‘and rrtificia: redig-:.ctiv:ty, alp5s9 bet.. .and qamma radration. chain decay, Fluclear fission and fue_ion. Elener!tnr :. particles and their elassifieatrm.

3. Electrot~icz: ‘:CICTL!IZ tubas-diade a~dtriode. 0-ma –t,.re materials, p-n ciodee and t,rmsir+ors. cir=i.rits for rectificsticn, amp! ifiration.and oscillations. Lcgic pe.-:.ec.
POLIIICfiL SCIENCE (Code No. 16)
Section ‘A’ iThcory1 1, (a)The Skate-Savercignty; Taeor-ias of Suvsre;.;int:;. (b)Thewie$ of the r3riqin.of tbc Skates (%ari%i cor:tract
(b) Democracy E:ectroal Theorim of
Histori ca!-Erolutianary  and Plarristr . 
(c)Thcories  of  the  functions  of  the  State  :Liberal 
Welfare and Socialist). 
2.(a)  Concepts -Rights, Propertr,  Liberty equality,  .Justice 

process;
representations: public opinion, freedom of speech, the role of the Fress: Farties and Pressure Groups.
(c) Political Theories -:Liberalism: Early ‘ s6.~.zial.i~m: Marxian Socialims Fascims.
(d! Theories af Development and Undzr Development Liberal and Maf-::i;t. Section F (Eovernment!
1.
GOVERNMENT -Covstit.utlun ard constitut.iona1 Governrmnt:
Parliamentary and Presidenti31 Government Federa i and Unitar-:/
GovFrnment: Ste.!e and Laca? l3;r’vernment Cabire.* Govcrnment:
Bureaurr.3cy .

2.
INDIA -(a) cclonialism and Naticoalisn in 1ndi.a; t?:.
nEtional 11heration rnovelnent ard cmstitea. trionaI dsvel.oprneri t. ,
!b! The Indian constitutior:. Fvndc2sent-*! F:iqbts? Dir<?c+.i.;e
Principles of Stst? PI .ip;: Lee,-L’;:3ttlrs.: E:.icc!-t,i:i,/~.
Judiciary. 3ncluc:ling 2udicia Review: i:% Rulp rli Law.
c) Federa.lism, incli.irjiTiq Crntr-. –
Farliarnentarv Syiitsrn ir, i<idia.

(d) Ii-illan Federalism compared and coptr–ar-t–.d w:. i:.h federalism in the IJSP ICriiada, ci~!.st~-ali;.. PIiqer.,~aand FT.?ajei~d. Republic nf Ser-mar?;. and t.he &SR.
PSYCHOLOQY (Cod. NO. 17)
Scope and method%. Subject matter.
1:
2.
Methods, Experimental methods, Field studies.. c.linica1 and
case methods. Characteristics of psychological stuides.

3.
Physiulagxal Basis. Strdcturr and functions of the
nervous system. Structure snd functions of the endocrine
system.

4.
QcvrLopment cf Behaviolir. Genetic Mechanism
Environmental factars, pro-8th and mntc!ra tior. ae!evan t
experimental studies.

9. Cognitive procesgsss !A; Perceptim, Perceptual pmcess
Perceptual organisation. Perception of farm, cnlour, lopth
and time Ferclptual constancy. role of motivation, s~!r:al
and cultural factore in percebiim.
&. Cagni +~veprocrcsss iii: !.earn iqa. Learning procsss.
Learn inp theafies. c: assiical cmdi timing. fipewt
conditionmg-cognitive theories. Perceptual iear.;inz.
Learning and nct:.iatian. verbal lewning. Motor :i.i.rning.
LearninQ and motivation.

7.
Cognitivc Processcse :iii 1 Pememwriny Peasurerr-: ‘c cf
rsmemberipg, .-short~tsrr melncry . Long term ;hesgry.
Forgetting. thewries of forqattiny.

8.
Coqnitivs Prcrcssses (iv1 Thinking. Develapment of
thinking. Language and thought. Images. Concept formation.
Problem solving.

9.
Intelligence. nature of intsllipence. thwries of
intelligence. Measurement of intelligence. Intelligence
and creativity.

10.
Notivation. Needs, drives and motives. Clarsificatirm
of Motives. Meao.arsrent cf motives. theo~iesof motivatiol.:.

11.
Personality. Nature of per-smal ity. Trait and Cy?e
appraoches. Ei.ologira1 and socio-culture1 determinants G?
personality. Personality assessement techniques and tests.

12.
Coping Behaviour. Coping inochmisms. coping kith
frustration and stress. conflicts.
L3. httitudrr. Nature of attitude=. theorieu of 4ttititcles
measorrent of attitudes. chsngr of attitudes.

14.
Communication. Types cf communication. cnnmunic;ts.v
proEess. ComnunJ ration network. listortim of Ccsmunictim,

15.
Applications of psychology in Industry. Educetior: an.:
Comrunity .

Concepts: race and culture; human evolution; phas-s, nf culture; culture change culture contact aczcc! tciration: cultural relativicm society; pcoup status. role: pf’:r:Ary, secondary and reference groups: cornmucity and as*ioci.itinn; social structure irnd social or-ganization; structure and funct-ions objective facts; norms; values and belief systems: sanctions deviance; socio-cultural processes-assimilnti~n, integration cooperation competition and cor?flict, sccial
Demography Institutions: Kinship systrcn and kinsnip usages; rules of residenc and descent! marriage and family; economic systems of simple arid complex societies-barter and ceremmial exchange, market economyf political institutions in cimplc and complex SocistieR; religion in simple and Qcmplex societies; magic: religion and science. fract.icsr ana Oiganisations, Sixail Stratifiratim: Caste class and estate. Communities: village, torn, city region types of society tribal aprarian, industrlai, post-industrial. Constitutional provisions regarding scheduled castes and scheduled tribes.
ZOoiOGY (Cod. No. 19)
1.
Cell structure and functign: Structure of an animal cell, nature and function gf cell crganel:ss, mitosis and rE’t-rsis, chrom@somes and genes, laws of inhrri5ance mutation.

2.
General survey and class.ificetioe of non-chorc!ates, iup to sub-classes) and chsrfites (up to orders) ci f.?!.1owing:

Protozoa,  P1atyhc::minthes,Pa-if era’, Ca1srtterata, 
kchemin the5 .  Annglidia,  Arthropoda  Mollc!sca, 
Echinodermata and chordata. 

2. Structure, Repraluction and life histcry of tne foliowing types :
CnnceSs. Monocytres, P!acmnd:um, Psrameriur,Eycon, Hydra, Obelia, Faseiola, Teenib, Ascaris, Nerais, Ph.zretima. Leech, Prawn scorpion , mckroach. a bivalve, a snail, Ba1anaQlQSSUS, an ascidian, Amphiqxus.
4.
Comparative anatomy of vertrbratms: Integument

5.
Physiology: Chemical composition of protoplasm. nature and function of enzymesi* colloids and hydrogen-ix concentration biolapical cxidation. Elementary physiology .of digestion, excretion, rasp:ratic?n, blood, mechanism of circulation with special reference to man; nerve irnpdlse conduction and transmission across synaptrc junction.

6.
Embroyoloqy : Gametogensis, Ferti 1 ization , C?ec+qe gastrulation; Early development and meta-morphogensi; o’ frog I Aocidian and retrcqressive metamorphosis. Nector.:. ; development of foetal membranes in chick and npmmals. ‘7. Evcllutiona Origin af lite. Principles and suicie-::es c;S evolution, speciation, mutation snd isolation.

~ndOSkrlctOn,  locomotory  Qrgans,  digestive  system, 
respiratory  system,  heart  and  circulatory  system, 
urfnogrnital system 8nd senrr mganr. 

9. Ecology: Biotic and abiotic factors: ca*cept ecosystem, food chain and energy flaw: adaptation c;f aour.t;c and desert’ tauna , parasitism arm srabiosrs. Factoi cal>?:;rs environmental pgl lution and it3 preventian. Endrqr!srsd species Chronobioloyy and cireadium rhythum.
9. Economic Zoology -beneficial and harmful irlsF!c:s.
.:
STATISTICS ( COdS N0.20)
1. Probability: (25 percent weight):
Classical and axiomatic definitions of probability, simple throrems on probability with examples, conditional probability, statistical independence Bayrrs thearem, Discrete and cintinuous random variables probrblity mass function and probablitf densit;# functicn, cumulative distributions function, joint marginal and conditional probability distri-butions of two variables moments, moments generating function chegichev’s inequality, Binomial, Poisson, Hypergeometric, Negative Binomial, Uniform, e::ponentlal, 3amna, beta. nwmal and bivariate norma? probability distributions csnverzence in probability weak law of larqv members, rimpie ton ot central limit theorem.
11. Statistical Methods ! 29 percent weiqht):
Compilation classiCicatig. tabulation and diagramtic represontation of statisf~cal data, measures at central tendency, dispersion, ckewnese and kirrtosis measures o’f arsctciatisn and cnntingency corelation and linear regresiicn involvi~gtwo variables, Torrelation ratio, c>rve fitting.
Concept ~f a ramom sample and statistics samo?ipg distributims of X, X , T and F statistics. their properties, estimation and tests of signiticance based on them. Order statistics amd their sampling digtributims in case 01′ uniform md exponential parent distribution.
111. Statistical Inferencs! < 23 percent weight):
Theory ot estimation, unbiaredness, consistency, etticieney, sufficiency, Crammer-Rao Lowar bound? best linear unbiased ertimstcs, methrrds cf estimation,, methods 09 moments, maviriim like1 it?ood, least squares,minimum X properties Q+ maximum likelihoed estimators (without proof;, simple prablems at tonstructing confidence intervals.
Testing of hrpothesis, simpie snd composite hypothes!.s, statistical trrts, two kirds ot errir, optimal crit…cal regions for simple hypothesis concsming one parant:t.>r. likelihood ratio tests, tert~ ?w the parameters of bibnr: is i, Poisson, uniftrm, exponential and normal distributions. l:ki-. square test sign teat. rim tpst medii;rr. ts5t? Wilsoxor: t.e:;t rank correlation-met3cdr.
IV. Sampling Tqsor;f acd LJesi~-,nf Experiments !Zf. 3s :ye?.* weight1 :
Principles af srmplinq, 7-smes and samp1ir.q ‘miti:. sampling and mm sampling w-crs, e.im.ple random zaf.:p:ir.,cq stratified samp). ina, =luster sampl.i.ng. systesatic ramplrnr!. ratio and reqressisn estime+s, deaizning of sample zurve:’? pith reference t.7 recent lrrge Ecsi? survey in India..
CInalysis cf v~riancewith ecual number of gb3erv?.:::.k-g5 per cell in one, twd acd three way claasifica:;a:,s, transfarmations .ta stabilize variance. Princi p!a3 cf experimental design, completely radomired dacign, Sandrmizsd block design, Latiq square design, missing pl~t technique, tactorial experiments with confounding in 2n design balancer! incomplete block designs.
Clnimal Humbandry I
1.
Genoral I 1mport.anee of liuestock in Agricu?ture, Relationraip between plant and CInimal Husbandry. Mi::ed farming livestock and mxlk production statistics.

2.
Gwetics: Elements of genztics and breeding 9s aoplied to improvwtent of animals. Breeds of indigenous snd exotic cattle. buffaloes, goats, shceps, Pip5 and porrltr..~ar.d t.ieir potentional of milk, egg5, meat and wool produetim. -. Nutrition: Clnssffication @ffeeds, feedLng sta!-?a!-do

.J.
computation uf ration and mining of ratro::s. canaar\.a:icn o+ feeds and ?odder.
4. Management: management .cf 1ivsstock IFreQnant ana milking cows. young stock). 1iwstxX i-ricords. Grincigles of clean mrlk DrddUCtiOn, econaries of livestbclt farming Livestock nousinq .
Veterinary Seiencml
1.
Mrjor Contagious diseases affecting cattle and draught animals. poultry and pigs.

2.
Clrtiticial insenination fertility and sterility.

3.
Veterinary hygiene with ,reference to wstar air and habitation.

4.
Principles gf immunisation and vaccination.

5.
Description. c-rmptoms, diagn@sls and treatment iif the following diseases of.

(a) Cattle. Anthrax, Foot amd mouth disea3e. Heamorrhagic septic3eme3 Kind..erpest H1acb: qi!ar ter. T:./ inpanit1c-DJ. ?. rrhoe?.
~
Pneumonis, TI>ber-r1_(1[1515. JohnE5 and diseases of new
disea~~

born calf.
[b! Pnult.r:,: Coc.:idiosis. Fi;rniC.het. Frwl Fr?::, Avian 1PI.ikOSiZ.

fiarck5 Diseas.?r_
(c) Sw1.n~: Ewine .fevs~. hc;g chalera.
6. !a) Fni-,mia u<si.d for brllinq anmais.
(b) Drugs ~1.secifcr doplng of race hcrces 3.nd the techni.nLie5 of detection. !c! DrI.ugs used t.: trwnqui J 3.2e wild anim.:.ls SB lye?1. as ?!-,?in irl captivit,/. !d! Zluarantine $nf-a.tcir& pp?v+lent ?n iin;jz.’3 ,nil snr-c.3.d ar.d
improvements th?r’?~ii. Dairy Science:
1. 5kudy of milt… cornpcr-‘;.tlon, ph/?-lc3: properties and tcmd va1uF.
2.
Qh-iality cmtrni ct mi.1b: commm t.erts. ?ega! ztandat-be.

3.
Utensils and eqvipment arid their cieanina.

4.
Organizaticn of Dairy. @r-oc?sszng of mili. and distribution.

5.
Manufactvre of India? ind’igenms milk products.

6.
Simple dairy aperations.

7.
Hicro-organisms found in milk and dairy products.

8.
Diseases tranzmitted throtcgh milk to man.

PUBLIC ADMINISTRClTION (Code No.22)
1.
Introduction: Meaning, scope and significance e t public administration; Private and Public Administration; Evolution of Public Administration as a discipline.

2.
Theories and Principles of Administration: Scientific Management: Bureasucrntic Model: Classical Thgory: Human Relations Theory: Behaviourai Clpproach; Systems Flppwaach. The Principles of Hierarchy; Unity nf Command; %er a* Con tro 1 ; Authority and ResponsIbi 1 1ty : Caord3.?atinn: Delegation; Supervision; Line and Staff.

3.
Administrative Behaviour: Decision Making Leaderchic ther?riss; Ccmmunioation, Mctivation.

4.
PerEcnne! Rdmrnistration: Role gf Civil Serdiee in deve1opin? saciety : PDsition C Ias=A f icatton; !=ecru1i.wnt; Training; Prometion; Fay and Service Condition, Neutrality and Anonymity.

5.
Financial Pdministration: Concept o+ Pudget: FCr’WJlStiOn and execstion of budget; Accounts and qudit.

e. Contrcl zver administration: Legislative E::eevtive and Judicial Control, Citizen and 6ldmznistrntion.
7.
Comparative Administraton: Salient Fcgatures of +dminhtrative systems in U.S.A.,U.S.S.R. Great ?3rit.=in and France.

8.
, Cmtral ~dminirtratim in Indial British legacy? constitutional context of Indian adminrotrrtion; The President3 The Prime Winister as Real Executive. Central Secretariat, Cabinet Ejecretrrlit, Planning Commission, Financq Cimmissim, Comptrollsr and Auditor Generdl c,f India: Major patterns of Public Enterprises.

Y. Civil Service in India: Recruitment of All India and Central Services; Union Public Service Commission; Training of ICIS and IPS; Qencralists and specialists: Relations wlth the Political Executive.
10. State, Distr:ct and Local ddmulistration: Sovernor Chisf Minister; Secretaciat; Chief Secretary; DirEctorates: Roie 01 District Collectnr in revenue. law ano ordpr and develoment adminrstratim: Fmchaayati 4aj; Li-ban local qocet-nment: llain features, Structhre and problem-areas.
PFIRT B -MCIIN EXMINATION
The main Examinatran is inkerulgd to assess ths oversli intellectual traits snd depth of understanding of candidates rather than merely the ranFe of their intorination and. inemor:.. Sutficient choice of questions would be al. awed t3 tk candidates in the questron papers. The scope of the syllabus for the aptional suujrst papers for the emmination is brcadly of the honours degree level i.e. a level higher than the bachelors degrre and lower than the masters degrsr In the case of EriDineering and law the level corresponds to the bachelors degree.
COMPULSORY 8lJSJECTS
ENBLISH MD INDInN LANWMES
The aim of ttle paper is to test the candidate’s ability to read and understand serious. discursive prose, and to expresrt his idear clearly and correctly in English/Indian language concerned.
?he pattern of question would be broadly as follows: English –
(i)
ComDrechcnsion of given paEsages.

(ii)
Precis Writing.

(iii)Usqe and Vocrbulary.
(iv)
Short Essa… Indian Language –

(i)
?omprehension of given passages. !ii) Precis Writing.

( iii)Usaqe and ‘Jocabularv. (Iv) Shcrt Essay.
(v) Translation from English to the Indian langitaqa ar.
v ics-versa.
Note 1: The papers en Indian languages and Enq?ilah will oe
of Masriculation nr equivalent standard and will be 0′:
qualitging nature only. The marks obtained in these paprrrc
will not be eount@dfor ranking.

Note 2: The candidates will have to answer the English and
Indian Languages papers in English and the respective Indian Languagc(exwpt where translaiion is involved 1.
QENERCIL STIJDIES
General Studies Faper I and Pap~rI1 wail cavw the following areas of knowledge –
(1)
Modern History of India and Indian Culture.

(2)
Current events of national and international importance.

(3)Statistical analysi5, graphs and diagrams:

PRPER I1
(1) Indian polity:

(2: In’dian economv and GeopraDhy nf India; and
(3) The role and impact ct+ sciencs ~pgtechrrolrgy rn the development of India.
In Paper I, Plodern Histarv of India arid indian CuItur-E will cover the broad history of the Cairntry from about tho middle of the nineteenth century and wculd .alza i:-,cJ!.td.i questions on Gandhi, Tagore and Nehru. The pert rir1A:zriy t statistical analysis, graph6 and diagrams will include exerciues to test the candidate’s ability to drrw cocmoii sensm conslurions from information presented in statistical graphical or diagrammatical form and to point nut deficiencies, limitations or inconsistenciec theraii.
In Paper I1 the part relating to Indian Polity, will include questions on the political SYStm in .Ir?dia. Sn. ‘the part pevtaining to the Indian Economy and Geography of Irndia, questions wibl be put on planning in India and the phy*aical economic and social geography of India. In the third part relating to the rile and impact of science and technoloqy LF. <he devalopment o+ India, questions will be asked to test, the candidate s awareness at the rmie and impact o? sciencr, and technology in India; emphasiz will be or! applied alrpectr.
OPTIONAL SUBJECTS
MRICULTURE
Ecology and its ralevance to man. natural resources.thair
management and conservoticn .?%yeica! 3nd scrci&\lenvironment


3s factors of crop distribution and prcd-irtIs~.Ciirniti,~
elements as fsr-tori of crop qrorth, impact of changing
environmn-t on crapping pcri-tet-n AS indicators of
cm.lironiner;t=.EnviranmcntBl poi :ut.inn and ~sscci:#tad hazarrls
to crops, animals anc: humans.
Cropping patterns in dlffernrlt. aqra climatic zmez r;f trr
country -1moact of hiqh yieleing and %hart duratiin v3-iet.i~~
on shift= in crwprrSng patterns Concepts cf multiple
cropping, mu1tis.torey< relay and inter-cropping and t.heir
importance in relation to rood production.Packagr of
practices tor production of important cereals, ~IJ~~RS, oilseed fibre, sugar and COamRrCidl crop8 grown during Kturif and Rabi seasons in dittrrmt regions ot the country .
Important features scope and progation of various types of forestry plantations, such as,crtension/eocial fore8try.agro forestry and natural forests.
Weds their characteristics, dissemination and as9ocietion with various crops: their multiplicat ons; cultural, biological and chemical control of weeds.
Processes and factors of soil formation; lassification of Indian soils including modern concepts; Hinerai and organic constituents of soils and their role in maintaining soil productivity. Problem soils, extent and distribution in India and their reclamation. Essential plant nutrients and ather, beneficial elements in soils and plants; their occurrence, factors affecting their distribution, functions and cycling in soils.SymbYotic and non-symbiotic nitrogen fixation,
Principles of soil fertility and its evaluation ?or judicia1 tertiliser use.
Scdl conservation planning on water shed basis, Erosion and runoff management in hilly, foot hills and valley land*<: proces8rr and factors affecting them. Dryland agriculture and its problems. Technology for stabilising agriculture. production in Painfed agriculture area
Watmr use e7tigApncy Am rehtion to crop production -.criteria for rchmdulfna irriQationr,ways and means of reducing run-off loerss of irrigation water, Drainage ot water-logged soils.
F4rr management meope faportance and characteristics,
m

planning and budgeting. Economics of different types farming systems ..
flarketinp 8nd pricing of 8gricultural inputs and outputs, price fluctuations and their cost; role of co-operatives in 8gricultural economy, types and svstsms of farming 8nd factors affecting them.
Agrrcultaral axtension, its importance and role, mthode of evaluation of extension programmes, socio-economic survey and status of big, small and marginal farmer9 snd lan.&Iess agricultural labourers3 the farm mechanization and its role in agricultural production and rur3*! employment.Training programmes for extension workerc,: lab to lmc: programmci.
PAPER -I1
Hered tY and variation.Mende s 1aw ot inheritance, Chromosomal theory of rnheri tance, Cytoplasmic
inheri’)lance,Se*:  linhed,aea  inf Iuence  and  se::  limited 
characters.Spontaneous  and  irducsd  mutuatio n.Ouan titative 
characters. 

Origin Jnd domestication 3f field crcp.Morphology ostterns of variations in varieties and related species of important field crops.Causes and utilization of variations in crop improvement.
f3pplications of the prin’Liples of plant breeding to the improvement of major tieid crapq;methods of breeding of self and cross pollinated crops Introduction, selection,
:bridization. Heterosis and its exploitation,Male sterility and self incornpatability utilization of mutation and polyploidy i.n breeding.
Seed technology and importance;production~pt-oc~~ssingand testing of seeds of crop p1ants:Rol~ of national and state seed rcrg;iri.isat ions in production, processing and :narket.ing of improved 5eed5.
PhySiOlo~~Jand its sigr,ificance in agrirctl tiire: nature, physical properties and chemical cnnstitrrtion of protoplasm; imbibition surface tension, diffuslrm and
~
Osmosis.Absorption and translocation of ~stertransprr.3tion and water economy. Eniymes .snd plant pigments:photos~~nthesi4-modern cbncepts
and  factors  ai’fet~I:inn  the  pr?cess,aerobir:  and  anoeribic 
respiratim, 
Growth  and  deve1opiiwrlt  ;  phot;,  periodinns  and 

,vernalizatrcn.Au:<im. ha,rmanes and sther pian% regulators and t.heir mechanism of aiticns anit itnpcrrtnnce in agricc!ltut-e.
c1imatic reqaLrements arb cu1ti~v a-ti an 03.f majnr frcIits, plants and vegct.gab!e crnps: the pai:l:.sgp c.f practicer. and it..? scientific basic5 for the sarns.Handling and marketing pi-oblems of fruits ancf vegetaDIes;Frrnc.ipal nethods (Jf preservation, important fI-CI itB and vegetab’Les products, processing techniques and equipment .Rcle of fr-uit and vegetable Ln human nutritiun: landscape and f lori-culture including raising of ornamental plants and design and layout of lawns and gardens.
Diseases and pests of fimld vegetable, orchard anc! plantation crops of India and 65.asures to coritrol these.Causes and classificaiun of plsrt disoases;Princi~1.~s of plant disease .Imtrol includ :ng exclusion eradication, immunization and’ protection, Bio:ogiLca1 controls of perts arid liseasesgintegrated management n: peRtc and diseases.Ppstic5 des znd tlwir formu:ations! p?ant protectior? equipment, their care an3 maintenance.
Storage pests of cearels and pulses,hygiene of 14:orec.e qoduwns,preser\atiom and remedrr measures. Food pt-oB:itct.im and ci’rl=wnpti!m t!-ends in 1naia.Natic-a 1 dnd internatioria1 +ma sciliCie5 .Pr@criremen t ,distr! ;-C!+ Ior:
t=fprocessing and production ccnstr~i;rt~,Rela~i~n triad productior ta national diatery pzttr5l-n ,Inajor def icienries I;’ calorie and protein.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND VETERINARY

SCIENCE
1.  Animal  Nutrition 
Energy  sources,energy,metabnlism  and  requirements  tor 
maintenance  and  production  of  milk ,crat,i?ggs  and 
work.Eval.u+tion of  feeds  as sources of energy. 

1.1 Advanced studies in Nutrition-protein-sources Of protein,metabolism and synthesls, protein quantity and quality in relrt :…on to rcquirements.Energy protein ratios in ratioi.
1.2 Rdva-Iced studies in Nutrition-minerals-so~lrces, functions, reqliirements and their rrlationship o? the basic mineral nutrients including trace elements.
1.3 Vitamins, Horrncnes and Growth Stimulating, substances. Sources ‘unctionr,requirements and inter-relationship with minerala.
1.4 Fdvanc@d Ruminant Nutrition-Dairy Cattle-Nutrients and their retabGlj.s,i, 4th rotarsnes to milk production and its compositjon. Nutrient requirements fi>r ralves,heifers dr:r and ail:..ing Csws of feeding
and buffaIce.~.l-Fmit.~~’i.~r.~ rarieus
S’f.;terns.
1.5.Advanced Non-RUMINPNT Nur;tim Fnu1try.-Nutrients and C.hSir metjlbu!ism with refcrrnce to poultry, meot and egg prnr’uction. tJutri~nt~ requirsments snd feed furmu lation and broilerr at jifferent bge5.
1.. b Ad;.anced Ntm-rum inant NutrItion Swine. -Nutrients and their metatslssm ritt-special reference to grcrth and quali+y of meat product1.m. Nutrient rsg~rirenants and feed formulatiun tor baby-growing and finiabinp pigs.
1.7 Rdvanced Applied Animal Nutriticp.- criti.caal review and evelultiarl of feeeing ~periments,dig@stibility and balance studies.Feeding starrdaFds and measures of feed ennrgy.Nutrition requirements for growth, maintenance and preduction Palancad rations.
2 himal Physiology I
2.1 Growth and Animal ProduFtion.-Prenata1 and pcstnatal growth, maturation,growth curves, measl!re3~afgrnwt’h factors aifeeting growth, conformation, bedy consositifin. meat quality.
2.2 Milk Productim and Repriduction and Digestton.-Curren? status of hormonal cmtrol of mamirary,develcpmrnt milk secretion md milk ejection. comwsii.ion of mi?+ of C~WSand
buffaloes.  Msie  and  female rsprnduction  organ..  their 
components  and  sunct-ian.  T.igeCt:.*-re  organs .  and  their 
functions. 

2.2 Environmental Physiolcgy .-P!lvc lolqgical r.+lat?.nna .:nrJ their regulation3 m~chanrsns at rdaptror , s?,jj t–x-.mzm+:?.l factors &nu reguiL:’o-y nechanism inwlued ::i an: n.7′ behaviour, methsds of control 1.ing clin..-krc srresc.
2.4 Semen qijality, PrePervation and Grtif LL:L<.: 1nsaminaticn.-Components of eemer, composition of PFerrnatcrrJa chemical and physical properties of ejaculated semen. :act:.:.-% affecting semen in v~voend in vitro, Factors affactino sermr preservaticn compositisn of diluents.sperm ccnccnt:-n…+on Yransport gf dliuted semm.Doep Freezing technrruec ;? m-.-&s: sheep and goatsl swine and poultry.
3.LiVRStOCk Production and Management:
3.l Commercial Dairy Farminq-Comparison oq>dair:* far mirq in India with advanced, countries. Dairying undeec mi:.ed farmino and as a specialised farming, economic dairy farming, starting of a dairy farm. Capital and land rcq;iirement. organisation of the dairy farm. Procurement. of goodr: opportunities in dairy +armicg, factors drtermhing the efficiency of dairy animal ,Herd recording, budgeting, coEt of milk production; pricing policy : Personnel hawtagemrnt.
3.2 Feeding practices of dairy cattle.-Developing Practica: and Economic ration for dairy cattle; supply oV greens throughout the year field and fodder rsqt::,rements -.I+ Dairy Farm,Feeding regime5 for day and yoiing stock anfj ac!lls. heifers and breeding animals; new t,-sndr in feeding *mung and adult stock; Feeding recwds.
3.3 General Problems of sheep, goat., pigs and poiil-:r~ management.
3.4
Feeding of =mimela unber dr@uSht corditions.
4.Milk Tmehnology:

4.1
Organization of rural milk prccurment, c!~llectir.,snrl transport of raw milk.

4.2 Quality, testing and grading raa mil!.,Quality Ytcrap grade of whole nilk.Skimmed milk and cream.
4.3 Processing, packaginp,stcring distributing marketing defects and their contrml, and ntrtritive properties of ttn following mi1ks: Parteurizsd ,etandxedhed toned, doiablt-tonbed, steri1ired, toned, double tonned ,stccri1iz4, homogenized, reconstituted, recombined, filed and f1avoureO milks.
4.4 Preparation of cultured milks, cultures ard theit-management. Vitamin D. soft curd acidified and other spocial milks.
4.3 Legal starrddar-ds.Sani tabion requirement for clean and safe milk and for the milk plant equipment.
PRPER I1
1.Genetics and Animal breeding ;Probabili ty applied to Hendelian inheritance Hardy Weiberg Law. . Ccncspt and measurement of inbreeding and heterozygosity . Wright’s approach in contrast to Malecot’s Estimation of Parameters and measurement3. Fishers theiren of natural selectian,polvmorphioA. Polygenic’ systems and Znheritance of quantitative traits. Causua: components cf uariation Biometrical Inadsls and co vzriancr between relatives. The theory af Pathooef+ic:.ent appl isd to quantitative genetic analysis. Hcritabil it;#Rcpeatati?ity and aelection mooelr.
1.1 Pcpulatinn, Genetics i?.pplied to Fnimal Prerding .-
Population vc.individira1 pcpulstion size and factors changing it. Gene numbers.. .and their estimatinn in farm animals, gene .frequency and zygutic frequency and forcss changing them, mean B~IJvariance approach to equilibrium under different situations, srlbdiuison of phenotypic variance: ertitna?Lm a? alditi.de, non-additive Senstic arid envircnkmntal vrriancos in Animal pupulatj.cn. Fend=! LB~and blending inheritance.Grw,sfic nature ~f dif termcss between species, races, Dresds an3 nt.hcr sub-scecif ic Brcuprng and the grouping and the crigln of graup differences. Ressmbl ances between re1atives.
1.2 Br-erdrng systems. Heritability repeahbilrty, genetics and environmental correlitions, methods of estimation and the
precision mf estimates of animil dats.Review OC biometriwl rclstiohs between . relatives. Mating systems,’ inbreeding, outbreeding and uses Phen.c.lc::rpi c assnrtive mating aids tc selections.Fami1: struct.iwe GT. animal populatior. LX~ er non-random matinru systems. Breeding for threshold trai ts, selection inder , it= precision. Genrra: end -:p~:i.tier. cambin’ing ability, choice 09 effective bre+din,P p:.~rrr..
Differen’t types dnd mbthods of cslrctior. t kip
~
sffect:ven@S%. and limj tations, sslrcti~n indirss ccr::+rl rtim 63f selection in retrospect; crvaluatlon of penet:.c \?aLPZ through selcrtron ,cor-alrted response in 1,i1,;I& 1 e::perimmtations.
Approach to n!5ti.matiofi of gerier-il and spec -r_ ?:7;t?ir. :?q
r…

ability, Dia!le+.e.,fractimal diali.?’f..? c,-oszes, , -,-.coc~! reammt se1ccti.m: inbreed in9 and h.:dt-i:atim.
2. Health and Hypiene.-f3na:omy nf 0:; ind Fawl. Histlogical technique, freezing, paraffin enbefjms etc. Preparst.ion an,r staining of bloocl films.
2.1 Common histclcqica! stains, Embrvclagy pi P COW
2.2 Physiolngy of blond snd its c~r-c~!Lat.i,-.n.respirstiqp; excretion, Endorrice glands in health snd d:.si?a,as.
2.3 General kcorledgs of pharmrrology an+ t!ie–ape.!trcs =t: drugs.
2.4 Vety-Hygiene with respect of wate’s, air and habitztl~n
2.5 Mort common cattle and poultry dissa-5, their mode cpf infmetion, prevention and t.rratment etc. Immunity, General Principles and Problems of meat inspection Jurisprudence Q* Vet practice.
2.6
Milk Hygiene.

3.
Milk. Product Technology.-SeIection of raq -materials assembling, production , processing, storing, distr:biit.ir*g and marketing milk oroducts such a5 Eutter,Ohee, whoa, Channa,Cheese; Condenssd evapOrat&d, dried rvilr and baby foods; Ice cream and Ku1fi:by 3roduets?by pcoc:icC.g, butter milk lactose ,and casein. Testing, Erading, .iudqing milk products-!SI Jnd figmad specifications, Irpel rtwrlards, qualit] control nutri+i.:w properties, Prckaging p?-r:a?eeing and operatima1 control C@sts..

4.
Meat Hygiene.

4.1 Zunnosis Dis@ar,es tranemxtted from animals 😮 man.
0.2 Duties end role of veterinarians in a sl+u*.!eter house to provide .neat that is produzed mdor ::jeal h:.girr,ir conditims
4.3, By-products frem slaughter houses anrj thejr eronoini c utiliration.
4.4 Metbods of czllaction, g-eservati@,i and prncassinp G< hormonal a Lands for medicina: use.
3. Ertmneion .
3.1. Extension Ditfarent sethods adopted to edi.cate farmers under rural conditions.
5.2. Utilisation of fallen animais for protit-exrmtio,n education etc.
5.3. Define Trysem-0ifter-t possibilities and ?bethods to
provide  self-employment  to  educated  youth  under  rural 
conditions. 
5.4  Cross  bregding  as  a method of  upgrading  the  local 
eattlr. 

MTHROPOLOOY.
PWER I
FOMDCITION OF CINTHROPOLOOY
Section I is compu1sor.i Csr.didatec may offer either SectionII-a ar 11-b. Each Section :i.d.I&II) carries 15:) marks.
SECTION I
I. Meaning and scope of Anthropology and it5 main branches. (1) social-cultut-31 Anthropology ; (21 Physical hthroplogy; (3; Rr.~rolcqjcal Anthropology; (3jlinguistrc Anthropolagy;(S) Rpplied Anthropology.
I1.Community and Society Inrtitutians. grc.up anj associatiorr;culture and civilization; bsnd and tribe.
111. Marriage: The pmblems of universal definiticn; incest and prohibited categurieo; preferentis? forms of marriage: marriage paymerite; the family as the corner 3tone.of human society; universality and the family, dunctions of the family! diverse forms ot family-nuclear. extended, joint etc; Stability and change in the family.
IV.
Kinship: Deucent, . resldmer,:alliance, kins, term ad kinship behaviour, Lineage and .el an

V.
Economic tlnthropoloqy: Rea.ning and scope: mpdes of ewchange;barter and ceremonial exchange; reciprocity and redistribution; market and trade. VI Political Anthropology; Mranirlg and scope;T7s locus arid power and the functions of Leqitimate authot-it? in different societies Oitference between State and Stateless politrcal systems, katim-building crocesses in new State, lew an.:. justicr in s.impler rocietisr .

VII. brigins of re1iqions:snrmism and anrm=tism, D.i*fw-ew:s between rcJigims and magic. ‘i’l)tcm?.=rn and -:rtoo.
VI II. Fie1dwork and f1~Idwari: tradit;an= in Pqtbrcpa?ngv
BECTION 11-A
1.Foundrtionc Of the thwy of organic eva1:-\tiop L~~r..!;i3l?\, Darwinism and the Synthetic, theci-y: Human sml.:tim: bioloqical and cultursi drmensions, Micro-nvclution.
2.
The Or-Qer Primate. A cumpwrative studv:o+ Primaxs ~izh gpecial reference to the anthnropoFd apes and man.

3.
Fossil evidence for-human evolution: Dry ophti~~~~a. Ramapithews. Australoprtkecinee. Homo ere: he (Pirhecanthropinesl,Homosapiens ncanderthalsnsia and !-!sac sapicns.

4.Genctic~:definition. The mendelisn principles ~:~-d it3 application to human populations.
5. Racial differentiation of ,Man and bases ot racial classification-morphol~ical, seriological and genetic. Role QC hmrmdity and t#nvfronncnt ih the formation .>f racer.
6. The erfscts of nutrition,inbreeding and hybridization.
SECTION 11-8
1.
Technique. method, and methodolog? distinguished.

2.
Meaning of evolution biological and SOC~O-CIJ? tural. the basis asurpticns of 19th. cen twy evolcl tioni nm, "Th?" comparative met3od. Contemporary trends in avolutiin.?.;y studies.

5. Diffusion and diffusionism -Pmer:can dintrLbuti.>nism ani historical ethnology Qf thr Enrmac ‘speil:ir.g ethnologists. .t!:.e attack on the "the" comparative methcd ‘bv diffusiooiEts 3Iii Franz Boss. the nature, puraass arc! methods cf comparixm ir. social-cultural. antnropology. Rebcli f.Ce-Bro*m, Egqnn. &cat-LGW~S
and Sarana,.
4. Patterns, basic pe-sinality construct anj mode! peraonzlity . The relevance af anthrupologicil app-oach tc n4tional character studies. Recent trends in pkyc7alT?icn! anthoropolgy.
3. Function, and cause. Malinowski’c cgntribi:C-ion to functionalism ir? mcial qnthrapolcgy. Functim and structure Redcliffe-Brown. Firth, Fortes and Nadnl.
6.
Structwaliem in linqdstics and in social anthrspolog;, Lev.i-StrauP5 and Leach in viewing 50Chl structure as a model the -strueturalrst method in the study af my.-,h. New EthnmraDhy and Yormal semantic analysis.

7.
Norms and Values. Values as a catwory of anthropological

description. Values of anthrcpologist and antropolqy as a source of valums. Cultural relativism and the issue of universal values.
8. Sociil njlthropoloqy and history. Scisntitic and humanistic studies distinguished. R critical examination of the plea tor the unit:! of method of the nature snrl racial sciences. Ths nature and logic -a? anthropologicr! tield work method and its autonomy.
INDIFIN RNTHROPOLOQY
Palaeolithic, Hesolithie. Neolithic, PrDtohistoricfInaus civi1i:ationi dimensions cf Indian culture. Distributron and elements in
racial and l~ngu~stic Indian
POpUlatiQn

The baaiz c+ Indim socia?.c-yetzm:’Isrnr A!hram Purusharaths, Caste, Joint family..
The growth of Indian 2nthrGDology. Distinctiveness rrf anthr@Dologicil ContriDuticn in the stud*/. of. tribri end peasant eectiom of the Indian population. The basic concepts vsed Great tradition and little tra.di+on; Sacred ccaple:: . Universalizaticn and parochia1i;ation: Sanskriti:ation and Werternzzation -Dsminamt caste. Tribe-caste continuum, Nature-Yan-Spirit complex.
Ethnographic profiles ot Indian tribes; racial linguistic

and socia-economic characteristic. Problems of tribal peoplerelirnd-alienationp indebtednsss, ‘lack of educational facilities, shiftinbg-cultiva+ron, migration, forests and tribalr unemplovment aprlcultural labour. Special problems of hunting and food-qatherng and other minor tribes.
The problems of  culture-contact;  imnpact of urbanization and 
industrializaticn  depQpul&tiQn,  regioralism,  ecaromic  and 
phycholopical frustrations. 

History of tribal. adm: nietratinn. The eonrtiti.itiona1 safeqirards for the Sctsa5uled Tribe=. Policies, plans proqrammes of ?ribal development 3rd their impl.emrntations. The Fssponse of the tribal people to the gcksrnrent measure3 for them. The. differimt appro.3ches tG tribe1 p-oblems. The roIe O: anthropcloqy ir tribal development.
The cmstitutiznal provisrons regarding the scheduled caste. Social dis~bilitiessuffered by the scfieduled rratr and the soeic-economic problmnce rrc4 by them.
I=siies re1 ating ta wtiona! ?ntagra.tim.
PWER I
1.
Microbiolog: :Viruses, bactria, plasnidc –stri;c+ure an.j reproduction. General account 09 infsctior: zinc! ir!mrnolcqy, Microbes in agriculture. industry Cmedicin~. and air, soil and water. Control of pollution using micro-urganisrs

2.
Pathology : Important plant diseases in. Indin cair6ed by viruses, bacteria,mycoplaema, fungi and nematodes. Kodes of

‘infection, diusemination, phys1olos:r and parasitism. and
mtMs of control.Mechanism ot action at biocFdes. Fungal
toxins.
5. Cryptogams I Structure and rcpraduction from evel,Jtionsry aspect, and ecology and economic importance of algct, fungi. bryophytes and ptcridophytes. Principal distrit.;, tion in. India.
4.
Phancroqams:, Clnatomy of wood, sieccndary 3ro.ith finatomv of C3 and C4 plants, stomata1 types Embryology. barriers to sexual incom,platibilit:/. Seed structure, 7pomixis and. polyeabrynny. Polvr?alogy and its applications. Compsrinion of systems of clasification of sngioqaerms. MEdern trends in biosystrms~ies. Taxanomie and &cOnOm;tc impor’l;.nio of Cycadacesce, Pinaceae. Gnetaies ?lagno1 is ceae, He.:uncu lrerar . Cruciferas. Rosrceae, Lepuminosaa, EupParbiaciae. tTalvsce+.a. Dipteracarpaceae, Umbslliforae, ASCl€pladaCes2, Verbaveceae: Solanrceae. Rubiscsae, cricurbitacese Composrtnr. Grrrnsneas, Palame, Liliaceoe, Musaceae. and 0rchidac-e.

5.
Morphagenesis : Papar-ity 5:#mmetry and totirotency . Differentiation and dedifferentintian of cells and grgans. Factors m? morplmpenesis. Methmc:agp, and dpplications n.i cell, tissues, organ and protapi <.it rul twec frc?m vrqetati VE and ieproductive partz. Somatic kSrid3.

PAPER I1
1. Cell Biology: Scope and perspective. general knowledge cf modrrn tool. and techniques Ln the study of cytoLr;py.
Protaryotic and wkaryotic cells -rtructural and ’, ultrastructural details. Functions of org~mellrs including mmbranrss. Detailed study of mitor is and meicvsis. Numerical and structural vhriatians in C~rcmosome and thrir significanc&. Study of palyt@ne and lampbrush chrornoscaes -structure, behaviour and cytological significance.
2.
Genetics and Evolutions: Derelovment c:f genetics a~dorins concevt. Structure and role of nucleic acids in p*mte:.qs sythesis md reproduction. Genetic code and repul atio:, n f gene erprassion. Sene amp?ificaCv:n. Mutation and ev evoluti-an.,Hultiplq factcrs, linLs.:n and crossing over. Methods ot genemaping, SCY ch.~-mccoser and ze::-l inked inheritance. H.;lestsri ?it?#. it5 significavce in piant breed ing . Cy top1 ac-mic inhet-it+!.lca.. Elrments c.1 human Genetics. Stanoard deviation and Chi -sn:xre anslys-1. 5a-w transfer in micro-crganirmi. Gecetxc eng:neerir:rJ. rJrg+.qii evolution -evidence, neehenism rnd theorizs.

3.
Physiology and Gioche~stry: DeFailed st1:dy a? wete-relations. Mineral nL!tritinn and imitransgnrt. tiine:-al deficiencies. PhQtce;mthcPis -mr’=banism and imporranre.

I
photosystems I t II, phntorespira tion Sss~irstian and termentaticn. Nitrogrr! fixation sni nitr-sqen m~t9baJj-sm. Protein svstbesfe. En~:~n;c5. Importance of seconjsrf metabolites. Pigmgnts a= p03toreceptore. photoperiodism. flowering. Growth indices, grawth movemefl ts. Senescence. Growth rubstrqces -their chemical nature, vole and applications in agrihot-ticulture. Aqrochemicalr, Stress physiology. Vernalization Fruit and seed phyriology dormancy, storage and germination of reed. Perthecocar’phy, fruit ripming.
4. Eco~Q~J~~ factors. Concept and dynamic oi
Ecological community, succession. Concept of biospheres. Con~ervat-.oii of ecosystems. Pollution and its control. Forsst t.,pcs c.f India. Rfwestation. deforestation and social fcl..,str:. . Enda,ngered plants.
5. Ecencmic Botany : Origin of cultivated plant%. S*.~KI.!.!I plants as sources of food, fodder- and forage, fatty ,Di:s7 rood .and timber, fiber, paper meher, bwsraqes, a!rC?nc!. drugsr nar.cotics, rosins aiii g’me, e=.ent.~a! OL!+. .Jye.i, mucilage, insecticides snd pest.icrdss. Plant indiz abir::. Ornamen~alplants. Energy plrntetior~.
CHEMISTRY
PAPER I
1. 6tamic srructure and chemical bonding: %tanturn !COT ?. Heisenbrr-g s unsertainty prin=ip:e, Schrodinger wave equati-on (time inaspzndentj. Inty-pt-statinn of the wave fa.!?ctirn, particic iC d cno-dfnenrionai biJ:’, quantus n*-mbs!-s, k:/d-cg*:;-atom wave :JPcticns.Shapes i)f E p,and d ,orbi:a 1I.lo!^:: c :.F? d ; Lattice enery;: Pm-n-Haba-FSIJ~I~~ d;pclr .*c?;~.rt,
c:.siw. rule, characteriitirs of im3c compounds9 e:ectroneg;+: fyity differeflces. Covalent bond and its general charsctat-.l:+tics : valence bond approach. Concept of rescnance and re:sonance energy. Electronic configuraticrn of HZt, HZ, N2, 02, FZ, N0,CO and HF molecules in terms of molecular orb’tal. 8pproach. 8igms and pibondc. Bond order, bond’strongth & bond length.
2. Thermodynamics-: WorW, heat and energy. FLrgt law cf thermodynamics. Ent.halpy + heat capazity . Selakionihip between Cp and Cv. Laws Qf thermcchcristry. Llrchoff’z equation. Spontaneous and non-spontaneous chsngeo, second lsw of thermodynamics. Er,tropv changes in gases tor rrlversiblr
and  irreversible  processes.  Third  law of  thr?rmcdynamics. 
Free  enerrjy,  variations  of  ?ree  energy  of  a  ga~wit3 
temperature,  pressure  snd  vulums.  Gibbr.  – Helmholtz 

equation. Chemical potential. Thernodvnamsc criteria for eqdilibrium. Frse energy chmge i:i chcmica I rsactiuii x.? equilibrium corstant. Ee+ect nf te:aprretitr–. L prczsiire
chemical equilibri?m. Calcu?~tlona+ equi!rt?riiim il.>nitai>’a from thermodynamic meosuremenls.
3.
Solid State : Fwes c.f solids, law 6f .constsrrc? of interfacial angles. Crystal systems anti crystal classes (crystallographi groups!. Dcsiqnation of crystal 1’z-c~~. latice structure and uqit cell. Laws c!+ rational ipji,:e=. Bragg’a law. Xray diffrac+.im try ::-….stals. Qe:fEr-t:., 2:: cryetals. Elemmtatry stud!. of liqwe crystals.

4.
Chemical kj.netic= -Order and molscularity of a re.*ctioG. Rate equation5 tdifferential integratd forms) c.t zrre, first and second order reactions. Half life gf a reaction. Effect of temperature, pressure and catalysts on reaction rates. Collision theory of reaction rates of biomalecular

reactions.  Absolutc  reaction  rate  theory:  Kinetics  09 
polymerisation and .pboto-chemica? react ions. 
5.Elrctrochemiotry.  Limitaticni  Cf  Arrhenius  theory  of 

dissociation, Debye-Huckel thmt-y of Qt-mg electrolytes ard its quantitative treatsont. I: 1ectro:ytic conductance theory and theor? of activitv co-rf f icien ts. Derivscion of 1imitincj laws for various equilibria and tranrport prooerties 0f electrolyte solutions.
6.Canccntrstion celI s 1iql id junction p=tsqtie1 appi:cat iQT! of o.m.f. messi.’rcmenti c?:: f.Je? c~lls
7. Phct3,r:he’l)iBtr:t:-Ikscr.zt.inm in+ llght. :anbmrr-Bsor-‘s law. Laws cf phOt5Chem’J.~itT:. nuanturn ef f.izir?ncr. Reasocs f=r high acd 1c.r quantpm ?ieldc. Phcjtn-alectr:~ collr.
Y. Genet-?.. Chesistrv cf ‘1’ blci-.k olementi:
(a1Elrctrtm i c cmltlqur.5tio~, intrgd~ct to tnecriar nf

iZn bonding is tranaiticn m=*s.: cmiiplews. C:-vst41 fie;,?’hesr;. and its aadificzticna; ..ap~licatiansc;? t5e thhecrriee IT..
tag?
explanstior ct m.qnc?+iGm and c:ectroni.c ac!rctr.z af mrt.4:
camplexes.
(b)Me+-a? CarbmYle,: Cv~lopentadiencl,3lcfin ad acsty:e*lr
complexes.

(cl Compwnds with metal-metal band-. amd metal rtnm c!usti?r?
9.
Gmera! Chemistry of f’ b:c:k elsmsntr: L.3nth~nib~sme. actinides: Separation, Oxidstion etatue, magnetic 2nd spectral prcpertier.

10.
Reactions in ncm-aqueeus solvsnts (liquid ainrnonia and sulphur: dicxidel.

Reaction mechanisms .: Geveral metheds (both, kinetic and nonkinetic) ot study @fmechanisms of arpsnic rear:,tims illustrated by examples. Formation and stability d reac2zvr inte<-inedia+es, (carbocations, carbanions, free carberies, nitrenei
redi~313~ and benzynes 1. Snl and SnZ mechanisms -E1.E and ElcB eliminations-cis ape. trans-addition ta. cxbm tc; =srbm dm.!l;le morhc…
hcr-r!s-i zn of addition tn carbon-uygen dcwble b~!-iC=-Mi rhael add2 tior: -addition to confugsted c.i:-.bnr.-cri-bon davb:rz %mils -sr’nmat1 . electrophilic rrld nucleophi!xc sutctFC-utrtms -al!-:!: c :nI trenzylic subetituticrrs.
2.
Perlcyclic reactions: clasaifi :ati7n3 and gxarplrs. -elementary study 09 idoudward -+iof:’aar i rsries of cericyc:.i.: reactions.

3.
Chemisgrv of the following !%-me reaction%: a?dol condensation, Claisen candensation, Eieckmann recrzticn i, Perkin reactinn Reire-Tieaann reaction, ten-.izzara reaction.

4.
Polymeric Systems:

(a) Physical Chemistry of polymws; End grcup ar.c,lysie, Sedimentation, Light Scatterin2 a& Viscizsity of p:!lymers.
(bl Polyethylene, Polystytene, Polyvinvl chloride, Zieqler
Natta Catalysis, Nylon. Terylena.

(e) Inorganic Polymeric Systems; Phosphonitric halids compounds: Silicones: Borazines.

Friedel Craft reaction , RstGmmatsky reaction, puizbcol-pinacolone. Wagner -Meemein and Bcckmann rearrangementsI and their mechanism -u60t of the tolldwinq reager?ts in organic synthesis : NBS, dibovane, Nii-I irluid ammonia.
5.
Photochemical rractions of organic and incjrpanic compounds : tyoes of reactions and examples and sy:?thetic uses -MeChcdE used in etructure determination; Pr:.nciples and applications of UV -visible, IR lH, NMR and mass spectra for structure aeterninatx& ‘Gf simple crgsni c an3 inorganic molecules.

6.
Wolecirl ar Structural detrrminatians : Principles and Asplicationi ta simple Urqanic md In-organic Molecules.

(1) Rntrr.inn&: cpectra af cia:.orni; mr:leculesi infrared a.nd
Faman!,     iwtnci: ciijctitutian and rctatirlnal ccnrstant:. 1:ii) .’Jibv~tio~a~ c?;diatcrnic linear ovmmetr-c,
spectra linear asymmetr,ic and bent triatorii ieo!ccula-! Iintrarcd and Ranan1 .
( iii)Specificits oi the unctional gr-?~’..p.r t lnfrared and Raman1 ,
(iv)
Electrmic Spectra -si7glet snr! triplet states, conjupat.r-: aouble, A.9 uns-turated cr.rbowI compr-unds.

(v)
Nuclear llagnctic Reasoflance: Chemical shifts, spi.?-SPin coup1 ing.

(vi)
Electron Spin Resonance: Study of inerganic eampiexer and tree redicals.

CIVIL ENBINEERINB
PAPER I
(fi)Theary and Design of Structures:
(a) Theory
Principles of superposition, reciprocal thearern: unsymmetrical bending Determinate and indetersinatr structures; simule an7d space frames; degrees of freedom; virtual work; energ;. t.heor-em: deflection of trusses; redundrnt frames, thr.?e-mosiEpt equation, slope deflection and moms?nt distribut1c:i nrth.;a.;: column analogy;. Energy method, s?pt-o::iaa’ce and w:iterica’. methods.
Mowing Qads -Sheslrinq force and Bending moment .Jiitc;rims, influence lines for simplk 2nd cnntinuous beams and frim~-s. Analysis of determinate and indet:-.mmirrate arches: s!>andrei qraeed arch.
Matrix methods of analysis8 rtittness and f :. ::!::oil-L -8
-%#
matrices Elements Q? plastic analysrs
(b)Sterl Cesiqn
Factors of safety and load factor’ Design G? tepsian. compression and flexural members$ built up bemz p.;d plate girders, semi-ripid and rrgid connectims.
Demiqn ot stanchions, slab and guessted basei’; crane onc. gantry girders; roof trusses; industrial an* multi-storeyecj building, water tanks.
Plastic design of continuous frames and portals.
-421-
(c) R.C. Design
Design @f slabs, simple and continuous beams, column. footings -single and combined, raft foundations, rlevatd water tanks, encased beams and columns, ultimata load design.
Methods and eustwms of prestressing; anchorages; loirses in prestress. Dcsign of prestressed girders, ultimat@ load design.
(8) Fiuic Mechanics ant! Hydrauli:~ Engineering. Dyna.mics Qf fluid fl3w -Equations of continuity: energy and mcmentsz. Ecrnou! lis theorem. crvitatinn velocity potential and steam function; rotational and irretatianal flow. ?ree Jnd fc?r=rd vertices. flow net.
Dimcnsiorai anri!~sri and its application trr practical prnblsms. Viscou’e tiow -Flak >?twe=n static and moving perellel p la tee
.. .
flow through .circular tubes. film lubrieatlon, velocit: . distrihutian in Laminar .and tilrbulent flow; boundary layer.
Iacomprrssib?e ?Leu chmugh pipes Laminar and turbulent fliu critical velucit./. Icsses, Starnton diagram, Hydraulx and energy grade lines: siphmc;pips networks. Forcer 3n pim bends.
Ccmpressible flow -Adiabatic end iSenthr0DlC flow, subsonic and supersonic velocity: Mach number chcck waves; ktcr Hammer.
Open chmnel flow -Uniferm and non-uniform flow, bkt hydrau?ic cross-section. Specific energv and critical depth gradually varied flow; classificetion of surface protilrr;
control sections; atanding wave flume) SurQrs8nd wavms. Hydraulic jump.
Design of canals -Unlined channels in alluvium; the critical tractive stress, principl2s ot sediment transport regime theories, lined channels; hydraulic desig:? and cost analysis; drainage .behind lining.
Canal structures -Designs Jf regulation. warri; CrmS drainage and communication works -cross regulotors, heat? regulator canal falls aqueeucts, metering flumes, astc. Cam I out lets.
Diversion Heedworke-Frinciples of oesign @fdift’.zren+.parts on impermeable aid pcrrnmblr focndations: k:F.r.sla’.; theory;Energy dissipation, sed inent e:!=I vsion.
Dams-Dsripn  of  rigid dams,  earth &me:  Forces  =c*!.ng  ?.. 
dams;  stability analysis. 
Design of  spilways. 
Wells and Tube Wells. 
CC)  Soil  Mecnanics  and  Foundatiorl  Eqiqesrr,ng: 1. 

Wectianics- Origin and Ciassification of 30?.1s; A:.+.w-bur.j
limits, void ratio; moisture cnntnnt5; perv-aeaki iitv:

IabGratOry and field tests, Seepqe acd tlow net?, f ! 3% cndcv-hydraulic structures. uplift and quick SA-~::mcit;=:. Unconfined and direct shear tests: ‘triax ia: t-:s+* earth pressure theories, stability of slopes; Tbcries c.f scii cohsolidation, rate of settlement. Total and stfecbvk stress analysis, pressure distribution in 5OilFsj Boussi~.esque and Wasterguard theorrcs. -1 stabilization.
Foundation Enginccring-  haring capacity of  footings, pilm 
and  walls;  design  of  retaining  walls,  sheet  iiles. and 
caissons. 
PAPER 11. 

Note; fi candidate shall answer auestions only from sny two parts.
PART A
Building constructions:
Building rrsterialc rnd !3onstruc:r.ions-timbri-. tone, brick, sand surlbi, mortar. concrete, paint:? and varnishes, plastics, etc.
Detailino of MI li, flor.v-s, rc?o+s,ceiii?qs, staircase., doors and windows. Finishing CJ~ bi.:iicing-p:as+erfng, pointing, painting. stc. Use 3f 5u.1.13ing cgdes. Ventilrticn, air ccnGitionirig, lighting an,:! accousti=s.
Bui?ding estimates and spcc’i+icstisns. Construction Schcdul.mg-PERT snd CPY methods PART B
Railways end HigWays Engineering.
(a) Railways-Permanent way ballast. sireper; chairs and fastenings; poi^ t= and crcssings di f f erenc tynes of turn
outs, croBo-over setting out of pcints. Maintenance of track-super elsvatipp, ;reep of rain, ruling gradients. crack resistance. trartrve efforts, curve
resistanceI Station yards and machinery; station buildings; platform sidings: turn tables. Signals and interlocking, level c:rossim~g.
(b)Roads and Runways-Classification o? roads, planning geometric dmsign. Design ~t flexible and rigid pkvements; sub-basus and wcarinq surf aces.
Traffic enginering and traffic e-urveys: intersections roac: signs; signals and markings. PMT c ‘
Water Resources Engineering
Hydrology-Hydrologic cycle; preziDitAtion. evaporation-transpiration ad in?iltratim hydrograpi:s; units hydragraph= Flood estimation and treouenc:, .
Planning for water Resources-8r%s%Y avd surtece water resources; surface fleras. projects
Single AI?~ n~uIti.vurpos~ storage capacity, res~rvoir~ac’scserv0.i:. sittzr.q.; flom routing Benefit. cgst ~-sti@. ::enara1 nrinciplrs cf optimisation.
Water Requirements for Crcps-Ous.:it7 of irrigaticn water-. cansumpYive use of water, water dspth and frrc*.nenq 5: irr1gation;duty of water, Irrigation metheas
??I!
efficiencies.
Distribution system fcr caPa1. irrigation-Determiri~~.~nn.f required channel capacity; chalinrl losses..d:Fgnmer t of main and drstributory channels.
WaterlogQing-its causes and contro’l, design of drainags oysiemi soil salinity’.
River training-Principles and Methods. Storage Works-Types of dam!is(includinp earth dams), and thoir
ehrrrctmristies, principles of design, criteria for stability. Foundation treatment;Jointe and gallcries Control of clRepagr.
Spillways- Different type sand their suitability energy diosipatinn. Spillway crest gates. PART D
Sanitation and Water Supp:;.: Sanitation-site and orientaticn of buildings ventilation and damp proof course;house drainase; conservancy and water borne system of Waste disposal sanitary appliances latrines and urinals.
Disposal of sanitary sewage industrial waste, storm se&age- separate and combined system. Flow throup!i sewers. design or sewersr sewer appertenancss man-holes, inlets, jur-cticns. syphon, ejection etc.
Sewer treatment-workino princinles; units, c:h.a.mbers: sedimentation hnk ctc. "Activated Sludge procEss; se3tLc tank; disposal nt slildse.
Rural sanitation; Envirom&ntal polluticn and crc.~lop…
Water supp::/-Estintatim of water rosou.rce5: qsour.il water hydraulics; pradictrng demand of Nater, Impurities of water Physical chemicsl ar;d bacteriological analysis. water bm-ne diseases.
Intake of water-Pumping and gravity scherer-:. bhtar treatment-Frinciplss of setlinq, coapulation, floxulation and sedimentation, s?ow, ‘ rapid and pressure f’iiters! softening; removal of taste, odour and salinity.
Water Distribution-Layouts, storage; hydraulic p:iprliner, pipe fitting; pumping station and their operatims.
CORMERCE AND CICCOUNTCINCY
PCIPER I.
ACCWNTINa AND FINANCE
Part I: Accounting. Auditing and Taxation: FIcceunting el’: a financial information system-Impact of bchavioural sci er,ces Methods of accounting of changing price levels with particular reference to current Purchasing Pawnr (CFP) Accounting -advanced .problems o+ company a.cco!;n:s -Amalgama tion absorption and rec@nstructior! a+ conpa’zes Accounting of holding compmies-urluation ot star-as and goodwill. Contmllership functions -. Prcpcrt’f contrcl leGal and management .
Important provisionc of the Income Tax Act. 176I.-D~fici ticp- Charge ot income tax-Exempticns Depreciation and I nvoctmrmt allowance-Simple problems of computation of income vnder the various heads qnd determinatfon of nssessable. income-Income-tax authoritLes.
Nature ar:d functions of Cost-keeoun ting-Cos t classification-Techniques ot segregating scmi*~ariahln CQst5 into fixed and variable components -Job costing-FIFO and weighted averaqe methods of calculating equ:\al.mt unit= rt production-Reconcil.tation of co%t and financial acrorlnts-tnar~inal Costing-Costvolume-profit realtionship: i.!lgebric fornulae and Oraphiea1 reprereptation-Shutdbwn point-Techniques of cost control and cost reductron budgetary
contra1 flesible budgets Standard costing and vacirnc. analysis-RsrFonsibsli ty recounting-bases of charging overheads and their inherent fallacy-Coating for pricing
decision.

Significance of the attest fuccticl? Programnmg the audit work.-Valuat.ion and vei-iticatim of as-iets: fixed, vsgsting and current assets-Vcrificaticn Gf liabilities-Audit af limited c~mpan;es-appointmenr 0tatu5, pmusre, dutiea anr: liabilities of the audi tcr-&ditor’E report-kudr t of share rzpiLcai and transfer e.’ sharGz-Spdiai points in ;:.he audit z? IsanL-inq arid ihsurance canps?ies. Pzrt I1 : Sueineea Finance and Fiilanclrl institL!tiot-+s.
Csncevt ar’ig CEO~F uf financia1 Manapmen :-*y:.nan=i* i goals of c:lt-poret-ons-C:-,z.i tal !xdr;etir!Z; Ru lcc or ?pa.? txmb and Discounted cash f!OY c-fgr-t~inty in
rp.rrEr.-~ar-.-irc~!-i;orlc-i~q investment decisions-Der~.?ni aq XI .>ptima; caprt.7.:. crrurtc;re-Wu:ghteU .n.rrraye cost I+ :x.o:ta: w!j t3s contr-dwrsy suvoundiny chr +!!odigl ia~:. snr! Biller-mcoi!. . Socrzec-of rnioirg shcw-5-termt itrtsrmsdi~wand long-t~i.s: finance-Role of pub1ic and convertable debentures-NGrrs SIG quidelines reqarding debt-equity r~~tius-Determ;nents cf an optimal dividmd pol ic;~-o?txinis.inq moi??Is of Jacss E irS;.rtrsr snd Jobn Lintner-Fcrma of dividsird pa:.ment-Etruc tws 3f working capital’ and the variabie of:’c.!rtir.q the level of diffsnence of componen’ts-Cash flow ‘appraacn of forecasting working WPibl needs-Profzles of working capital.jn Indian industries-Grcdit management and credit .policy-Cansideration of tar in relPtzon
to financial  plsnninq and  cash flow  st&temcnts. 
Organisation  and  deficiencies  of  Indiar,  Money  Market 
structure  of  assets  and  lisbilities of  commercial  bank a-
Achievements  and fai ?!ires af national isation-Regional  rural 

bsnks-Recommendations of the Tandon IF .i.1 study grottp on foilowing of kank credit, 1976 and tlielr revision h;’ +he Chore (K.B. ! Committee, 1979–FIn aass:isment of the mone+ar” and credit policies o+ the Reserve Pariv. of Indie-Const.ituents of the Indian Capital Markpt–Fc!n~ticriB and warC,i.-.g of 911 ~-India term fkn5ncial institutions ;ICPI, IFC: PPIC’I 3nd
IRCI ) -inve.;tment po!!.cies of the I..~fsI!?sc~.r=tnc=.Corpnratron of India and the Unit Trxist cf Indl3-Fre5en.k stat9 m+ stoc! e::changes and thN?:Li- reqi.ilat an.
Fr@vis:ion gf the FJegotiab e In:t.~-v!n.nec>tsart , :c?.!!.
C.rossin3s and endorsements witii part:.ri..!i ac T?fr?v-e.;?ce t:i statutory protE?ction t.r, thv c nq and cGllerriny b:L~iLr-r?. -Salient, pravisr~~p ACT:.. t+it!i
of the rlwii.1.30F;e~~;.!la.tinr, l’rne reuard to chartering. r.nd of tecli 3.
s~:.r?er~/i.einn :eai.:?a+ion
P4FER I1

Organisstion Theor.) And Ind~~stir~
Re1ation5 Part I : OrganisAtior. Theory.
Nature and concept of Orpanlaat on -Crganiraticn (?oalc: Frimary and secondary goals, Singlz and multipl P t;oala. endsemeans chain-Displacement. succession ,expans ior: and
mu1tip1ication of 9oaI5-For m3I 0rgani5ation : ty pe.Str ctc!re–Line and Staff, functional matrix, and project-informal
arplinirrtion-tunctiono and Limitations.
Evolution of organisation theory: Classical Neo-clasei~al

and system approach-Bureaucracy;  Nature and basis u+  Pcwer 
sources  ot.  Power,  power  structure  and  politico-
Organ iaationa 1  behaviour  as  a  dynamic  s~stern:  techr. ica 1 

social and power systems- intrrrc!latinns and interacti.ms-Dercepticn-Stitus system: Theoretical and smp f 2-ical foundation of Phiilow, Hcgreqore, Herzberg, Lik:Wt, $,’room. Fortsr ana Lpw\ecl adam and Fcumsn Modcl:s of mot’%vation. M@ra1s am.! produckiviCy-Lezdergni p: Theories ?.ne =tyies-Management c+ conf1let= in argar!FSatiQn-i’t-nnsaetional Analysis-.Tipnif icancv of ciltdre ta organisations I-imits of rstionalj,t)g-sizn-H-?arch approach. Organisatic:%3l change adapta+ionI jr-owkfi and devslopment- Organrsat scnal control and sffectivrr..aus. Part 1T: Inoustrial Relations:
Naturr and r-zuoe of I~~.:atri~?
industrLa.1 r5latiot-s labour in Iwlie and its comnitment-i’hewies df uniaclisn-Trade union mo.%rent in Ic~dia-Circwr:h and 5.t:ri.iL+ire–Hc?P of qut’.’;dg leadership–Wcr%ers education and r.t:ier ur.b’sl=!na -CnI 1ecti:re bargair.inq -aoproaches cim-rjitiofis. Limitztians znd :.ts ef fectivencss in Indian mndi ti@ns-Wcr’..er~ participation in management: ohi!%c.ph:, rati~Oa:a, grsc+:t dsy state of af?ai*z-ond itr fuhrs prospects.
Preventim and settlement of industrial disputes in Crrdia: preveptlvc measures, settlement machinery and other m3asures in practice -Industrial relations in public enterprises-fibsenteeism and labour turnover in India induetries-Celative
wages and wage differentials: waqe pollcy in Icdia-the Bonus issiie-international Labour Oi-ganisa.tion and India-Role of perconne1 de9artment in the or3anisation-E :.:ecutive development, persunnel pcliciss? persorqel ac.fit and personnel research.
ECONIMICS

PAPER I
1.
The Framewc:’rl. of an Economy : National Tncome Fc-coi.int.ing

2.
Economic c.hoice: Consi.rmi+r beha.vitxrI pr.2cIi.~.(:p!-bfhavlm;i$r and mark.et tnrmc.

5. Investment decision5 and determination af i.r,cilrme ar,d employment. ms.cr o-econnrnic inlr?de!s of i!Icorne. a.i?itr-itwt_i.on 3ng 3rowt.h.
4. Fanl.:ing     end nf C.entr-;.l banklrz
@b~r?cti~fs instr-~ucr~fnta and Credit p~lirliesin a planned de\.,eInoin3 economy
5.
Types of t.a!,res and +.heir impacts on the ecorom’i. The impacts of the size and the content cf budt3ets. C)bJecti,v,es and Instruments of budgetary and fiscal policy In ii planned developing economy.

6.
Internatianal trsde. Tar-iffs. The rate of e!:chanqe: The

balance     of pa;rments. Internatioval m.nne+ary and banking ins.titutions.
PWER 11
1. The Indian Econornyr :aiding principles ~f Indian economic policy-P1 dnned growth and distributive jus tdce-Er .,d icakian of
poverty.
The institutional framework .>f the Indian sxnnmv. -federal qovernmental structure-ngricultrual and ‘industrial sectors-public and private sectors. National income-its sectora? and rsgional dtstribution Extent and incidence of poverty.
2. Agricul tura: Production: . c\gricu1tc:ral Pol icy
Land reformsI Technological change. Selatimship w-th the Industrial Sector.
3. Indr-strial Production: Industrlol policy. Public and private sectors. Regiorml , distributmn control of monos=?&sz anc
monopolistic practices.
4.
Priciny policies for apricrnltural and industrial or:tpllts. Procurement and Public Distribution.

5.
Budgetary trends and fiscal policy.

6.
Monetary and credit trends and policy-Banking and other financial institutions.

7.
Foreign k-ede and the balance of payments.

8.    
Indian Planning Objectives,. strategy, experience and problems.

ELECTRIC& ENQINEERINO

PAPER I
Network:
Steady state analysis of d.c. and s.c: networks, PEtWCrk theorems. Matri:: algebra. network functions trsrlsient response trequzncy resconse, Laplace trar.sform, Fcurier series and Fourier transform, frequorcy spectral pole-err, concept, elementary network ey nthesis. Stacics and ?lagr.ctics:
Clnalysjis of e:ectrostatic and magnntastatic fields-: ‘-aplace and PQiS5On Equation, sclrition of boundary value problems. Maxwell’5 equations, electromagnetic waye procaq.:’::gn, pround and space wwcs, praiaqatior, betwesi: eaVt.1 s+..aLicp and satellites.
Measurements:
Basic methods of measr;rements, standards errcr ana.lys1.-… indicating instruments cathode ray oscilloocane: meassuremerit of vcltage currert.power, resistancc. iadcctancr:. capacitance, time, frequanc) and tlux, sL;I..:tronic ~~et-*-% Electronics:
Vacuum and ramiconductor devicE-i: eqlaivaien* c: rrilit% $ramiotor parameters, determination of cwrent an.: vcltaqe gain input and output lrnpedances biasing techniqirc, si::gle, and aulti-stage, audio and radio sn+ll 3igna.l and large signal amplltiers and their analysis: feedback arnplificrs.arr;!
oscillators: wave shaping circuits and time base generators;
analysis of ditferent types of multivibrator and their uses:
digital circuits.
Electrical machines:

Beneration of c.m.t.-r.m.f. and tcrqur in rotatlng machines; motor and generatgr charact@ristice o? d. c. synchronous and induction machines equivalent circuftr, Cormutntion parallel operation; phasor diagram and equivalent circuits ot Dower transtoraer, determination of performance and e?ficiecy, autotransfcrmsrr. 3-phase tra.nsformerc.
PCIPER I1 SECTION A
Control sritema
Mathematical mndellirig of dynamic linear control systems, blcck diagrams anc! signal flcw graphs. transi-ent response steady stite er’lror, stability. frequency response techniaucs, root-locus techniques series coroensatim. Industrial Electronics
Principles ahd desiqn of single phase and poJyphase
rectifier..  controlled  rectification.  smoathfng  tilters; 
regulated  power supplies speed  control circuits fm -drivers, 
inverters.  a.c.  to d.c.  conversicn,  Choppers:  timers and 

welding circuits.
-TION B IHmavy currents)
Electrica1 Mach ines
Induction Machines–Rotating magnetic field. Polv phase mortor; principle of operation, hasor diagram: Torque! slip characterstic. Equivalent circuit and determination of its parameters, circle diagram. starters, speed control. Double cape motor; Induction generator; Theory; Phasor diagrem, charaeteristici rnd application Gf single phase motors. Application of twc-phase 1aductioP motor. Synshronous Machines–e.m.f . equatizr! phiror ar.d circls diagrams; operation nn infinite hca; s:/nchr-m;zinp power. operating charact.crstic and ps-fcr-(r.ai-.c+ l?v differmt methods; cuddin short circuit and s.nal:;si~ of mascilLograat.2 determine machine resctanres and time cmstrnts. motr characteristics and performance methoes ;Jf startirg ap)rlications. Special Mashincs–Gmvlidyne epd matadvns aperating cheracteristics and tneir +pmlicationi. Power Systems and Prection–General layout and ecoromics of different types. of power station: 535trlOad, peakload snd pumped-storage plants; Econoricc or’ rli?teront systems of
d.c. and a.c. power ditribution. Trvsmiasion line paremeter calculation; concept of 0.M.Q. chwt, medium and long transmission line: Insulators, Voltage distribution in .i string of insulators and grading; Environmental effects on insulators. Fault calculatian by symmetrical cemponents: load flow analysis and economic operation, steady state and transient. stability: Switch-gear Methods of arc rsxtinction; Restriking and recovery voltage: Testing of circuit breaker, Protective relays; prc:ective gchemes for power system equipment: C.T. and P.T. Surges in tranrmission lines; Travelling waves and protection.
Ut.ili5ation–indiiStrial drives electric moxors for various drives and estimates of their rating. Ee:laviccr of motors
during  starting  accoleration,  braking  and  raversing 
operation:  Schemes a:  sened control fny d.c.  ard  inductien 
motore. 

Economic ehd ot-er 3sGert.s of aifferont 5ysk~z zf rail traction 3 rnrch.mics of kt-ain movement wd rs+.iroetCm c: power and ewrry rsq~~1.rements at
and motor r?+:ing charac"cr\gtics tr-action mukzr-i D-.E!zcC-ric afi.3 inductiun hastxq .
SECTION C (Light current)
Communication Systeme–Ocneration ana detecticn c+ amp1itude–f t-eqilency-phase–and pulse-nodule te eiqna 1 s using oscillators modulatore and demGdulatQrs. Coinparison of modirlatec! 5;*sste!nc, nmise, 3rohlesr chmi?el eff iei@nc:r sampling theorem. cciind e~dvision bradcast transmitting ma recievinp 52"jtem, antefinas, feeders and rocei.ring circuits, transmiesicm line at audio radio .and ultra high frequencies. Microwaves –Electromagnetic wave in .guided media, wave guide components cavity resonators,. microwava tubes and
solid-state devicesa microwave .generators and arplificrs, f ilterr microwave measuring teChfl’iqUQS, microwave radiation pattern, commLinication aKd antenna systems. Radio aids to navieation.
D.C. Amplifiers–0irsct cmpled amplifiers. aiftcwence amplifiers. choppers and malag comolrtation.
PAPER I
Principles of Geography–Section CI: Physical Gt?oqr:.p+f–
1. Geomorphology–Origin an4 evolution at the .:w+.h’s crust: earth movements and plate tectcnics, -1o:car.icrli rocks weathering and erosion c/cie of erasiun–Dwid and penck,
I fluvial. glacial anb marine end karst landforns: rc.i?,*;enated and no1ycyclic lsndfarms.
ii. Climatolmg;*–The atmosphere, its strucC.ure and composition; temperature humiditv, precipitat on, pessure ?.nd
winds;  jet  stream,  sir  masses and  fronts;  cyclones  aild 
related  pheromana;  cl imatic  claacif icatio+i–Koeppun  rr.d 
Thorthwalt; groundwater and hydrolopicdl evcls. 

kii. Soils and Vegetation–S@il yoneris. cllssificntion an distribution; Biotic sueces%ionn and mdior hiatic regions c.f the world with special reference to ecologicn! aeprcts of savanna and monsoon forest biornes. Lv. Oce8nopnphy–Ocean bottom relief; salinity, currants and tides; ocmah depositn and coral reefs; marine resources–
biotic mineral, and enerqy resources and their utiliration.
V. Ecosystem–Ecosystem concept, inter-relations of mmrgy flows, *-%t.er circulation, geomorphic proqesses, biotic communities and soils: land cacabilitv: Man s impact on the ecosystem. q 1 oba.1 ecoioqical imbalances.
.Sectran B Yiimarr ar?d Economic Gzoqraphy.
i. ftevelnpmnnt of Geographical Thought-Contributions of EurrJpearr md arab Gsograobers. determinism and possibillsn: regional concsot-: =yst..zin ;rpFrnach, aod~ls and theory: qiranitita tive and behavzoura1 revolutims in mograohy. it. Hnmar. c?f mar; and races @+ mankind:
O~iJ~t-aDhv–E-~ergenca cirltnra! evn!..!+.~ur r?f mc; Frjor cultural renlrn= ~f t$t? world: i.>terri-7-!.’?;1~I miqratios, GRSL rr,d g?esen,l:.: wurlc! pop41atior. di+tribution and qrwth: demog raehi c transitIan anQ world population problem5.
iii. Settlement Oeojraqhy–ConceDta of rural dna urban settlements: Originns cf i!rmmisation: Gural settlments patterns; cencra: place t.heary: ranksize and primate titv distributions; rip,? classifications: wban spheres of in? luecce and the r!.!i-al urban fringe; the Internal 3itructut-e of citicF–khcc-Lrs and c’usr, cultural comparisons; prsblems of urban growth in the world.
iv. Political Geography–Concepts af nation and ratate; frontiers boundaries and buffer rcnes; concept of hewland and rimlrnd; federalism, political rtgions of the world; world geopolitics, resources, developments and -intumr?ional
po1itics.
V. Ecanomic Geography–World economic levelopment–measurement and problems; worId res@urres.their distribution and global problems: world energy crisis the limits to growth: wnpld 39ricci1ture–t.! po1oay and wcr1d aqricu1ti-ira 1. r-eyians: thecr-.; ,of qricLiltcira.1 1ocat.iw. di-6.f…!rion o+ immovstion and agricLi.1 tur-al. efficiency: world fuod and nutrition prohlnms; world industry–thear:/ of IocAtioo o-indctstries, wor-14 inrfu5t:i~l patrerns and proSlems: vlcrld oi trade–theory snd wcrld patterns.
PAFER I1
GEOGRAPHY OF INDIA
Fhysical Gspect.s—Gsn 1ogrca1 bistnr.. physiog ra.,h:/ and drainage ;;vst:ems: origin and mechanix of the Indian rnmonon identificati.on rind distrubtion pf drnught and flaoa Drone area-,: soils ?rsd veget.tion; :?.nd capabilitr: orhemes of natural, phy5ioaraphic. drain?qe, a.nd climate reginna 1 iz-aticn. Human &nect-,–Gene5is af et!iinic/raciaL diversities: tribal a!reas snd their problems: +:be r@lscf Isngv3ge. rel-.qim and culture .in the forination c?f reqion; hx itorica.1 pe!-:;q3z,=ti./$s on unity and d.i.,,ersity: populztien dist.ributi.on, den<;it,,, arin growth, populsticn prnblevs and policies.
Resources Conservation end utilisation r!f lhnd mineral, water, biotic and marine resoc!rcee-: ma<, and. environment–ecological problems and their management.. Agricul ture–The irif ranstructure, irregation power fartilirers, and seeds; institutional factors—?and holdings, tenure, consolidation and land reforms. agricultural ef f iclency and producti~JitrI intensit:; nF cropping. cro~ cambinations and aaricl.ll tural reaion.3.1isatim. oreen re.volution dry zone aqricxl tvre end aqrirxltursi !and itre policy, 4r,@rland nvt;-iti.or.; R*.ir?l eronomv–~nim~! husbandry. social fat-r.s.ilr:’ ai:d housahold industr;. . Indl_.stry—clistnry cf i.ndi.istr? a?. develoment factor: of localisation: stud:! of nii:eral based, sgro-based and forest based indu5.tr-ie5, 1 r,di! t,-ia1 dec.entpa1i 2at.i.cn a.id 1ndcistr131
ii-Jentif i.ca.tion nf backws,rA areas and rur3I. inc,lst.ria !,i~<5t~~nj Transport and ?rG.ee—5 kud;, of t:le networi: nf r~~2aLjw?.?~, rnilweL/s, +.riw~’/s and waterwa/s, ci\mpet;t.io!i md czmp1imen+.at-3. C-: in reui on^ ! c,mty : passenger and ‘cninmodlt., flows, intra a.nd interreqlonal trade and the role of rural ,iiark.et ciintre=. SettIementL–F?u~1 +et. t. 14mEnt_ pattr;r79: L’t-3+ID d,ve 1I)pment Iyr !r,d1a.: Ceriscir ccncepts rJf ~.!-nai-sredr;. .iurict::i-rn.l ant5 hcirarchical patil~rnsof Indian cit~es. city rsgiznr and the
rur~l.-urban ?ri;iqe:  into-nal  stru~ctur-eof  Indian  citiec:  t:>wr 
phnning,  sliims  3rd  vrb.3r  5’ai~si.ng: n?tion+l  ~.irnanrsat.~nri 
PO1.ic:. . 

Kegiondl Developnnznt and P?aninq–+e#?ional policies in Ind3.an Five Years Plan: experiences of repzanal plarninq in India, multi-level plaqning stat.^. district ar,d block level planning . Centre-state re1ations and the consti tutiona 1
-44111-
framework. for mu 1ti-1eve1 pIann ing . Regiona1isation for
planning for matropolitan regions; tribal and hill areas.
drought prone sr-23.5 cumma.nd areas and river basins: reqional
disparties in development in India.
FoIiticaI. As pect—Geog raphica1 basis of In d L an feder3 1ism.
state t-eorganicat~on: regicrnal and

conscio~~sne~s nationa I integration. tPe international bnundary a? India and >-elate,? issuec: India +p$i geopolitics of thP Indian 0cea.n area.
GEOLOGY
FlSFER I
I General !lea1 . Georni.yt-phology. Strt-i.ctc!ral Ge~loq;/. Fa1s.ecritic 1nu:: arid riaDh.! )
CjtrP?i~
I. Genera! Genloq;, :
EnErrJy in r~latinnt.o Geo-dvnamic activities. Clt-igiii and ;ntet-:ot-c.f tke E?.rth. Da-t.ln? t3.t rock,s b,? ‘.’at-i~?l-‘s method5 and a,;? of the Earth. Volcanc!es–ca~se%-a~drroducts: vc1canic be:L t-,. Earthquater -.-ca.I-!ses :I geo1cyic:?, 1 eP .fect ?.rd d>.stributior~: rilat.ion to volcanic belts. Gea-:.cnclincc er.6 t.hr;ir cisssification. Island arc=. deep Be? trenc9es znd mid-ocean ridges, sea+ loor spreading and
late tectonir.-r lzostr3cy Moi.!ntains—trpes and crigir.
~
Brisf ideas a.bnl.it continental driff, Drigin of continents ard oce;lhs. Radio+ctivity and its application to qeoloqical probiems.
ii.Olonorphology:
Basic concepts and significance. komorphic processes and parameters. Gemorphiecvcles and their interpretation.
Rmlief  Vestures;  topography and it%relation to  struetares 
and lithology.  Major-landforms Drainage systems.  Geomrphlc 
features of  Indian subcont;nent. 
iii.St-ructural Geology : 

Stress and strein ellipsoid. and rock deformcation. Mechanics o+ folding and faulting. Linear and planer structure-. and their genetic significcnce. Petret=cbric analysis, its graphic representation and apDlication ‘tc geological problems. Tectonic framework of India.
iv. Pa:aeontology.:
Ficro, and Macro-fossils, nodes of preservation and utility of fossils GerreraI idsa about classificahcn and nomsnclatnAre. Clrqanic e*rOiUt:Cr\ and the bearr p of palaeonto!ogical studies on it.
Mor=;hcloq:r class~ficat<on anb geolqicai I*.istorv including evolutionnr.~ treics of hrachiopods. br w 31 re5 gastropod+. aaonoids, trilobit.es, echinoids and coaraln.
Principa: groups of vertebrates and their mai-morphological characters. Veptebrates lifE! throaph .A ;WP ; dinosac.rr; Siwaifk vsrtebraree Detailed study Gf t?::-:;es, elephants and man, Gondwsrla flm-a and its importance.
Tyoes ot micrgtcrssils anU their significrnce hitk special reference to petroleum exploration.
v. Stratigraphy:
Principles of Stratigraphy, Stratiqraphi,: classif.ication 3rd nomenclature. Standerd stratigraphica: scale. Detailed r;tudr. of various geological s:fstems ot Indian subcontinent. Boundary problems in stratiprsphy . Correlation nf ‘:he major Indian formations Fith tkir world equivalents. Fir octline of the stratigraphy of ~.ar.ioi; geol@glCa~.s syc-items in their type-areas. Brief sti.idv F,? C?.imate5 and Igr-?ot.i+ ectivities in Indian cubcoptinent durifiq 5eolo3iial past, F’sl aegeographic recunstr-i-!ct.icnc,
PGFER I1
(fr:gstal Ioqraph I  Mineraloqy ,  Fatroloq:/  and  Ecimamic 
GeolLqy) 
i*  cry 5 tal1ogra:1hy : 
Crystalline  and non-crystal line  substances.  Special 

groups. L-attir’.? s:/mmetr:/. Cl3srrficatian of crystals int.2 52 classes 0.’ s/dinetry. International system af cryst?! lographi,: iiotation. Use of stereoprsphic pr-cje#:tronj ts represent cr-ystal symmery. Twinning and twin law.;. Crystal irregci.1.irities. Application of %-Fia:/ for r:rys+a! studies.
ii. Opetical Mineralogy
Genera1 orinciples of optics. isotr-opism and anisotmoism, can~pptsof optical indicatrix. Pleochroi=m: inteference c@In!irsand extinction. Optic orientation in crystals. Dispersion, optical accessories.
iii. Hinerrlopyr
Elements of crystal chemistry–types of boundieqs, loqic radil-coordination, number ioomorphrrm polymorphism b psudoncorphism. Structural classification mf silicates. Detai1ed study Qf rock-f arming minera1s–their physrcal., chemical md optical properties, snd Lises, if any. Stucv If the alteritiun prqducts of these minerals.
iv. Petrology:
Magma, its generation, nature and composition. Si;.apl+ phase diagrams of bsnary and ternat-.. system, and tneir significance. Eowen’s Reaction Principle. Wagmrlc differentiatinn: assimiletiun. Text#-ires and strucrurE:a, rnd their petvogenetic siqnificmce. Clessificat.i@nof i.gner.Jus rocks. Petrography ?.mi Fetraqenrsis of impcrtant rcck-t.. pa.: of Indir: grmites 2nd granites charnackiter a-a charnockites. Ikccanbrsa: t3.
Prors~?.jses nt farmation uf sedimentary rc;kj. Diaqenesis and lithitication. TeYturSS and structArer! and their sicnificancr. Classificaticn af sediment:ary rocks, elastic and nan-clrstic. Heavy minerals &na their signiricance. Elementary concept of dspositiona! environmerts, sedimentary tacies and r>rnvenanCe. Petrography of common rock types.
Variable of metamorphism. Types of metamm-phisr. Metamorphic gredes, zones and facies. ACF,AKF and CIEM diagrams. Textures, structures wd nomenclature of metamorphic rocks. Petrography and petrogenesic of important rock typec.
V. Economic Genlogy:
Concept of ore, ore mineral and gangue: tenor of ores. Processes of formation of mineral deposits. Comiw? forms and structures of ~intdeposits. Classificat.ion of ore depositec. Cuntral of ore ,deposition Metallaginitic epochs. Sttudy of importent niet.al 1 1.c and non-me+.al lic deposLts? 01.1 arid natural qss fields. w~d coal fields of India. Mineral wea!.th of India. Miner.?1 eiznomi cc, Vational Miner-a1 Po1ir:i. Conszrvation and !.:.tilrs-ltion of minerals.
vi. Applied ljec lag: :
EssFtrhtial: of propectinq and exploration techrii.quec.. Principal methe?% !J? mininr:. lsamplzng are–drsc,srrlq 3n.j benefi.caticn. Ppplication of Eenloqy in Engineering lwr-k::..
Elements  of  so3.l  and  groi2iidrater- 1?eoi.o3::  3.n~ 
geochemistry~  IJee  of aerial.  phofTgraphs  11, qcn!ogirsl 
investiq6t.ion. 

HISTORY

PCIPER I
SECTION FI History of India (Down tc A.D. 750!
i. The Indcrs Civilis3tion
Origins: Extent, characteristic features. ma.jor cities,
Trade and contracts, causes of decline, Survival and
continuity.

-445-
ii.The Vedic age
Vedic literature Geographical area known to Ve,dic texts. Differences and similarities between Indus civilisation end Vedic culture. Political. social and economic patterns. Major religious ideas and rituals.
iii.The Pre-Maurya Period
Religious movements (Jainism, Budhism and other sects). Social ad economic conditions. Republic and Growth bf Magadha irperialism.
iv. The Yaurya Empire
Sour.cos. Rioe, ertent. Jnd fall of the empire Administration; Social and EconomLc Conditims. khoka’ s policy and reforms. Art.
v. The Fxt-Maurva Per?.oe (200 B.C -330 cI.C.)
Principal dynasties in Northern and Souzhern Thdia. Economy. and Society: SansRrit, PreCrit sfii Tmil, Psligion !Rise of Maharana and theistic cults j. CIrt !Gar,dhara. Msthura and other s&ools!. contacts with tantra: %:.a. vj.. The Gupta CIqe
Rise and tall of the Gupta Empire,. the Vakaiakas. Rdministrhtion

saciety , @conom-/, litsraturs, srt ar:G
religion. Contacts with South East ash.
vi’i. Post-Gupta Period (C. 5C0 -750 P.Dl.

Pu6hyabhiatis. The Maukharis. The later Gup’-ir%. Harshavardhana and his timer. Chaluk.ta3 nf Badmi. The Pallaveo, society, administration and art. The Arat, amquest.
viii. General review of science 2nd technology. education and learning.
SECTION B

MEDIEVAL INDIR

INDIA: 75’3 G.D. kn 1200 A.D.
I. Falitica.1 the Rajp~tt~
and Social conditrons: their- polit,; and social Land ~-t.ri~cti\re, imp:!ct an
s+.rs!c:ture, a.nd its Society .
11. Trade and C:immerce.
111. Art. F’zligiam .md Philcsoph;!: Sankar~cha.ry3.
IV.
Maritime Actlvltiec: cnntsct-, with thpv Fr3bs, M~ut.!!sl cul tura.1 impacts.

V.
Rashtrakutas. their role in ~istor\;–C~ntributionto art and cv.ltvre. ?he chola Em@ire Local Self -Gnvet-nment. feattires of the Tn~ian villaqe system:’ Scciety. aconom:,, ar-t and learnrng in the South.

VI. Indian Snriety on the eve cf Mahmctd of Ghaznj.’~ Campaigns; Al.-Ei rt.rvi ‘5 observations.
TNDIG : 1200 -17h5
VII. Found.tion of t’he Pelhi Su1taqa.t~ In Northern India: Cause5 and circumstances: ~tsimpact on the Indian society.
VIII. -Khilji Imperialism, eignificance and implications. Administrative and economic regula’tion and their impact on State and the people.
IX. New Orientation of state policies and administrative
principles under Muhammed bin Tuahlug; Religious pa! icv and public wort.s of Firui Shah
X. Disl-.teqration of the Deihi Sultanate: causes and its effects on the I~dranDnlity and society.
XI. NS~CITPaqd character of state: political ideas and rnstitutiens. Rgrrrrian strctcture $.nd rr-.lat_lonc,; growth oi urban cen.rre5. trade and ccmnerce. conditirm ilf articans and
Xt 11. The Vi,ta;~nsgar Empire: its ?riqn and growth. contrrbuti.cm tci art. lrrpratu.-e and ctrl~ti.~re,socicl and econcmic r_ondit.j.one z:,ston z+ adnnistrati,anI brea).up nt the
If
.ija:l-aqar Empire.
XI’./. Soc,r,:cs of History: inport.wn+ Chronicles. Inscriptions and Trave 1 let-5 ArcorunCli. k"). Es.t;.!,l ichmcl.vt of Mvgha! Empire 2.n Nort’iern India: politi.c>l and social conditions ;n li;ndcic,tan on tne e\e af Fabur’s inva%ion: %bur and HLl.ma:li.in. Establishmept of the Porti-lqcte F. cantml in the Indi-.n ccsean. its political and economic ccnsequences.
XVI. Sur Administratlon, poi itica.1. revenue and miljtat-y adm-nistration .
XVI I. Expansian of the Mugha1 Empire under F\k.bar; political unification: new concept of monarchy under Akbar: Akbar’s re1igio-pol itica!. outlook.:. Felations with the non-llusl ims.
XVIII. Grcwth af regional languages and literature during the medieval period. Development of art and architecture. YIX. Political lr!eas and Institutions: Nature o+ the Wugha!
~
State, Land Re.venae administration The M~tghalState? Lan4 Revenue administration: The Mansabdari and the Jagirdari sy.=temc_. the land stri!cti!re and the role of Zamind?rr. agrarian relatinnc. the military arganisation I
XX. ALlrang2eh’ 3 reli3ioi!s pol ic:! :. e::pansinn of the Mi.!qha.l Empire in Decrsr?: Rsvol tc. aginst Rur_7n:~=eb–Characr-.;?ran.3 c’cmseuuences . YYI. Growth of c.rrban c:enfres: indvat!-ial. econorn" -1.1rb.31 and r!:.ral : Fore Lqn Trade and Commerce. The Mt.cghaL2 and the European tradinz ccmpanie.;.
XXII. Hindi.i-VLts1 im relations; trends ,?f integt-aticn: composite c~i1ti.t.~~
(16th tr! 13th centuriss).
XXIII. R1.c-e of Shib-aJi. his confllct with tne M\.~ghals: admin stration :.> Shiv3.ji. s::pansian of the M3.ratha power {under the Feshwss (1707 -. 17k.L) : Y?ratha politics1 str-i-icji.ir+, I.\nder +he First Three Feshw?:s: Chauth and S,irdF?sh,n*.t!hi: . Third Battle of panipat. c:auSec 2nd effects: emergence of the Maratha confederacy. its ztructure and role.
XXIV. Disintegration of the Mcfghal E.mpire. Emergence of the new Regional State.
PCIPER I1
SECTION A
Modern India
(1757-1947)
. ..
1.
Historical Forces and Factors which led to the ‘Sritirh conquest of India with sperial reference to Bengal, Maharashtra and Sind, Resistance of Indian Powers and causer of their failure.

2.
Evolution of British Paramountcy over princ@ls. States.

3.
Stages of colonialism and changes in finministrative structrre and policies. Revenue, Gudicial anfJ Social and Educational and their linkage with British colrmial interests

4.
British economic pcjlicirs and theii-impact: –Commereia! rsetion of. aqriculture, Rural i:it%btedns+s, Grawtl, of agricultural labaur, Destruction 09 hane.;craf+ induztries. Drain of wealth, Growth of modern znlustry and rise of a capitalist class. activities of the Chriitran Missions.

5.
Ef ?crts at regeneration of Indian society—Socia-rcligicue movements; Social, religious po:itical and ecmomic, ideas of t9e reformors and their vision Qf future; nature and lirnitatien of 19th Century "Renaissanct:"; csiP.te mw-caents in general with special reference t~ SouW inlis JFI:Maharastra: tribal revglts, specially in Central ar.d Eastsm Indie.

6.
Civil rebellions. Reuolt If 1857, Civil Rsbejlims and pcasaont Revolts with special reference .to Ivdigo revolt, Deccan riots and Mrnplia Uprising.

7.
Rise and growth of Indian National Movement:–Social basis of Indian nationalism policies, Programme of the earlr nationslists anj militant revolutionary group terrorists Rise. and Growth of commcrnalism: Emergence of Gandhiji in Indian pol itics inif his techniques of mass mobil j.sation: Nan–Cooperation. CL’iil Disobedience and Oui t India Movements: Trade Uninn ?+id psacsnt movements. State tz! people movements. Rise and growth of Left-wing within t.he Conaress- the iG3n3re53 roc~a.lists arid Communist:; Pt-itish officis.1. rrspmnee tn F!~t~.rtnal.~lobc?ment. Qttitvde nf the Congr-sss ti\ Con’I-trtr.!tion.: 1hange5. 1W7-1955; Indian N,?.+iona; Army I Mval Mcrtlns,, of 1944. The F’;~rtit.i~)nof Ir?dj,3n and Achievemevt af r.-eedom.

SECTION B WORLD HISTORY (1509 -1959)
A. Feographica1. Discoveries-Decline of feudal>.sm: Eeginnina of Capitalism. Renaissance and Reformation in Eurnpe. The New absoIute’monarchies-Emergence of the Nation sit.?te. Commercial Fevolution in Western Eurnpcz-Wercantilism, Growth of Farlismentarv in.iti.tution in England
~
The Thirty Yeare’War. Its significance in European !+istor-;.
Ascendancy of Fr.mce.
F The emergence of a scientific view of the World. The Age
of En1ightement.
The American Revolution- its significance.

The French’ Revolution and Napoleonic Era 11789–1815j.Its
significance in World History.

The gronth at liberalism and Democracy 1.n Western
Europe(1813-19141.
Scientific and Technological background to the industrial
Revolutiuon-stapes of the industrial revolution <n Europe.
Socialist and Labcur Movements in Europe.

C. Consolodation of Large Nstion St+tes– The Unification OP
Itlay-The tourrdina of the Sarman Ernpire.
The American Civil Wr.
C~lonialism and Imperialism in Asia end Africa in the 19th
and 20th centuries.
China .and the Western Pawers.
Modernisation of .lan~.nand Its emergence as d grz+t power.
The European Rcwers avd ths Jttaman Empire .! 1615;-14141.
The First World Wr -The Economic and secial impact of the
War -Ths Peace of Paris, 1919.

0. The Russia9 FievoIl.!tion, 1717 -Ecor.raic= and Socis?
Reconstruction in Soviet Unim.
Rise of Nationalist Movements in Indonesia, Chine 3.14 indo
china.
Rise and e5tab:ishment of communism in China.
Clrakenirrg in tho Arab Worid -Struqle for fresdom ano ?f?:*:arm
~J-I Eqypt -Emergence of Moaern Turkey under b:amr1 Cl+~r_!irk –


The Rise of Clrab nationalism.
World. Depression of 1929 -32.
The New Deal of Franklin D. Roosevelt..

Totalitarianism in Europe -Fascism in Italy -Nazism zn
Germany.

Rise of Malitari5m in Japan.
Origins and impatt of Second World War.

LAW
Pf3PER I
Conskituional Law: Con?ti tcitional Law: Freamb1e:Directiv.z Frinciplec: Fi.indementa1 Riqhts Judiciary: Centre and Sta.k.e F:sl.~.ti.on%: Distributim of Le3i.slatrve Powers: Freaident and h.ic; Power= Protection to C1.vi 1 Ser*-,.?nts? Amendment of the ccnstilli!tion. I1 Administrative Law:
1.
Natitre and Scope of Adminlstratiye Law.

2.
Delegated Le3iclation.

(i) as distinavished from Administrative Power.
(ii)
Factors leiding tn its growth. iiii)Pestra.ints :m delegation.

S.
Control Judi.cia1 and Le3islative.

4.
Principles of natural Jvstice and Fairness.

5.
Dmbuismen anj CVC.

6.
Fruhlic Undertakings

7.
Administrative agencies and tribunala.

111. International Law:
fi. (a! Nature and Sources of International Law.

(b) Relation between International Law and Mcimicipal ILaw;
(c)Subject of International Law; States; RecogsnLtion of States ansd Government: International Legal Personality; Individual<.
(d! Jurisdictioh and jurisidictional Immunity: Acquisition o+ sovereipnty over Territory Law at the Sea. International Rivers; Air-craft and space Vehicle?:
immunities  of  Stater  representative;  International 
Organisatio n and their agents. 
(01  State  rsPponsibility; !Tor tious  Contr.actua1I 
nationalis(f)  ation space exp?oration). Protrctian of 1nrJividc.sl  – 3.nd  Graups:aliens, 

National1ty , Natur3i isa tion : Stetelessnecs: Extradition and Asylum: and Human Sight..j and sri f’doterminstron.
(gl Treatier
8. Settlement of Diioiites:
(a)
hicabie Settlement of disnutes (b! The VPJ aivl the Set+lrmer.k af disputes.

C.
warand Neutralit:.#:

(a)
Nature of the Wa? and Self-defence collective Reswnribilitv and Regional Fects.

(5)
Geneva ccr.ention and orctarol nn the L3wn sf Ya;. !c) ConcEpt of Neutralit.

(d)
Neutraiftv after the 9N Charter.

D.
Charter of the UN:

Purpose and Prindplcr; organs; admisrion of States; the question of the micro and mini-states. Voting .procedure And Security Council, UN peace keeping operations.
PAPER I1
1. law of Crimes:
a. Indian Penal Code:
(5)
Definition,:, Jurisdiction.

(b)
General E;xceptions to Criminal Liability.
(c! Joint and Constructive Liabilrty (secs.34. lla. 149).
(d? Uffences aqainst Public traiiqaalit:,.
(e!Offences .z,gainst human body.

(f)
Offences anainst property.

(g)
Attempt.

P.
Socio Econnm~c Uffences:

Danqerot.!s Dr-tvq’: Act, 2950. Arms Fct. Prevention nf Corruption 4cC. Preventinn of Food Adulteration 4ct. FERA.
COFF PEA. 
!a)  Men5 Reas, 
(b! Mandatory ininimuin $ent.evces 
C.  Punishments: 
(a) Theories cf  pi-inishment.. 
(b) Types nf  pr!r,ishment  in the  Indian Penal Code. 
(c! Substit.!ite  for  imprisonment-probation  relerrse  siter  A:.!? 
admonition  a.nd  restrirtion  in -favonr  of  young  a?Fenders 
(c-ec.56il and cec. 361 Cr.F’.C) 

2. Criminal Proc?dure code:
(1). Freliminarv consideration -Extent. Applicabilitr Definition etc.
(2)
Constitution of Courts.

(5)
Power of Courts.

(4)    
(a) Poliers, Powers and arrest, search, arid seizure of property.

(b)
Prevention of Crimer. ,

(5)    
Duty of Public la) To assist police and magistrate. (b). To give information about certain ef?ences.

(6)Rights nf arrested persons !a) T.Y know Qrounds of arrest
(b)
Bail

(c)
T? be produced before the magistrate yitkmt oelay

(d)
Detentim at not more than 24′ hour8 withuut judicial

scrutiny.
(el Tg consult legal practitioner
(f; To tie examrned bv kh? medical practitroner.

(7)    
Consequences uf ncn-cnmpliance with the Pravisions relatinb to arrest.

(8)
Process to compel sppearances (dl Summons

(b)
Warrant of ‘arre5t
(c! Proclaimation and attachment

(d)
Other rules .rcgardirg processes 19) Processes of compel prcduction of things

(a)
Summons

(b)
Search
(cJ Forfeiture

(10)
Consequences of irregularities br illegalities f’Tin search.

(11)
Information to police; their powers ta investigate.

(12)
Jurisdiction of the Courts in inquiry and trial.

(13)
Conditions requisite for initiation of proceedings,

(14)
Complaint.? to magistrates and commencement o+ proceedings before magistrates.

(15)
Charge.

(16)
Type of trial5

(a)
Before Cnurts of Sessions
(b! Warrant Iases b? magistrates

(i)Cases instituted on po1i.c.e report
(li)Cases instituted otherwise than nn a nolice report, ( iiij Ccnclusinn of the trial.
( c! Si.!mmor.s cases: !a! Procedure for trial by magistrates (b! Si.imrnar:/ trials
<17) Evidence in Inquiries and Trials
(19)
Genera.1 prcvisions as to inquiries and trials:

(J)
Feriod of limitation (Chapter Irb! !b! fii-1trefoi.d acquit and aatrefeid csnvirt (c! Princinle of estoppel !d) Compounding of offences (el Withdrawal from Prosecution

(f)
Pardon to an accomplice
(gl Legal aid to accused at State expense

(h)
Courts to be opened

(19) Bail
(20)
Ju&gement

(21)
Aposal.
(221 Reference Revision and Transter.

(23)
Maimtenance of wivco, children and parent%

3. Mercantile Law:
General principles of Law of Contract Ssctian 1 to 75 dt the Indian Contract CIct,1872, Law of .ind:mnity; Guarantee Bailment; Pledge and CIgency.
Law of Sale of Goods, Law of partnerchip and Negotiable instruments and Banking, (General Principles with special reference to lndian Law)
Literature ot the ful lowing languages Note (i!A candidgte nay be raquir-cd !:o answer ~omror sl 1 the Puest:.ons in the language cone.zt-ned. Note fix;-lm regard to the lanpueqes included, :5 the Eighth Schedul to -CSnstitution, the scripts riil he the same as indicated io S@ction11 18) ot Appendix I relating to the Main Examination. Note (iii!-Candidates should note that the querticre not required to be answered an a specific language wil!. F.TZ to be answered in the language medium indicated by them far answering papers on General Studies and Optional . Sibjects.
PCIPER I
(a! Origin and development of the lmgciage in, nutline. (b! Significsnt ‘enturec of the qrammer of the Iangc!qge. Rhetoricc , Frosody .
2. Literary Histor? and Literary crit.icism-LIterar.: movements, c1ss:siCL1 backgroc!nd : Sacio-Cu1 t.i.i.ra1 inf 1l!encez I
Orig1.n and devel.opmer, gznres iqclcldiiig drama, novel short-story, e5say.
3.     Shnrt Ec-ra.:.-in Arabic.
PAPER I1
This paper will require first-hand reading of the text5 prescribed and will he designed to te5t the candidates’s critical abillt~…
1.
1mrat.i-i Oais: His M3nllaqah:
" Bifaa. Nabk..i mim Zik.ra Ha.ribin Wa Manzili" (Complete’,,

2.
Zohair Kin Abi Cvlma: His Mau1laqah:-"A min Riufa3
dimna’tnn Lain TaC~.~lea.mi"iCemplete) .

5.     Hassap Fi.n 1.habit: The fol.lowing five Oasaid frnm his
Ciwan:     From Oasidah Na.1 to Oa5ids.h IV and the G!a.r,idah: "Lillahi. Darct isdabatin NadamtLihL!m+YaLrman bij lilaeqa."
4.     Uma Pin Abi Rabiah: 5 Ghazals from his Diwan:
(i)     Falamma tawaqafna wa 5dlldmtu oshraqat + Wiujudhu.rn Zahahal Husnu an tataquanna. (Complete).
and
modern
of modern
11tcrar,.’
trend:?:
.:
(iil Laita Hindan anjazanta ma taidu + Wa 6haft anfusona
mimma tajidu (Complete).
(iii)Katahtu ilaiki mir? ba-ladi + Kitabs muwallahin
Kamadi (Completo!..

(iv) Amin aali Numin ar:ta ghaadin famubkiru phadata ghadia am
raaihum fzmuhajjrru [Complete).
Ivl Qaalali Feeh3 fiteequn Maqaalan + Fajarat Mirma
Yaqooluddumoou. (Comolstrl

5. Farazdaq: The follawing 4 &said frcm his Diwen:
!i! "Haazal . Lazi tasrifui Bethaarr Watatahu" in praise
of Zainul FIbideen Ali Bin Hc!sra:n.

(ii: "Zarrat Sakeenah atlaihan anab:-.?. hihim in praise
of Umsr Bin CI. Gzlz.
(iii)"\Ja Kcomin tanamul adliyaf ahan" in praise cf SJSE~

Pin a;-aae. (Cmoletei

(iv)     "Wa atl-asa assaalinwa maakano sahitan" in oraise of the Walf".
6.     Bashhar Bin Mard. The fo-llcruirrg two Qscaid f-om hie Oiwarr:
(i)     "Izos balaghar raaiul mashwarata fastain + .Pifaai
Nasee hinaw Naseobato haa2:lm.c. (tamvl e te> . Khalilaiya min Kaaoin aeenae akhoetunma i\llsa darahi ir-n.?? Kareem nuinu (Complete).
7.    
CIbu Nawas: First three Qasaid from the Diwan:

8.
Shaquii The following five Qasaic: from his Diwan ‘Al-Shauqiyal"

rn
(1)     "Ghaaba Bolwm" (Complete)
(ii)."Eaneesatum Saarat illa masjidi" (Complete!.
(iii)"Ashloo hs.wak,i Liman yaloomu fayaozaru" (Complete!.
(iv’)  "Salaamun  min  sabaa  Paradaa  araqqu"  (Nakbatu 
Dima.shk.1.  (Complete). 
"Salaamun  Nee1  yaa  Ghandi  -Wa  hazar  Zahr-u  min 
indi"  (Complete). 
Aathora: 

1 Ibnul Fluqaff: "k.aIia1a Wa Dimna" exc 1udinq Muqsddamah: Chapter I : Complete "61-6sad wa-al. thaur-" .
7
-kl.-Jahiz: Ai-E’ay3.n Wat Tab in : VII Edit.& h,, Abdul Sa1.m Mohd.. Haroon. Cair~.,. Egypt from pp. ^I.lto $35.

Ibn KhalJun: his Muqaddamah: 73′ paaes’ pert ai:: from the firrt chapter. From "41 fss.Ln-h:. sasdic minal k.ritaat;il awal" to "tda m.17 Fl!.rilrgih1 a.1 jabri.iwa1 tnuq 3.b 1a" 4 Plahmud Timur: :<tory. "Rmmi Mutawa! J i"fram his hoot "Cladla:-
Earil"
5 Ts~tYiqAl–Hsl-im: Prarna "Sinnul muntahiraa" from his boo:
"Mxrahiyatu Tab tiqal Iiakirn".
Nate: Candidcates will be requlred to answer s.oma
questions carryir,q not less than 25 per cent. mark:,-, in F+r2,blc:
also.

ASSAMESE
PAPER I
Part 1 I-avgiiage !a! Hi5t.o-y oi the c;:-i.gin and development of the fbsanese language -i,ts position among Indo-6rys.n language period in
its HistrJr~.!
I
!h) Morp%ology of the language-prefi.:es and cuff i::es–post position.:-dFclension and conjugation. The r-oictnd c-!c,te!n in the langui:.qe wi’rh refe-enc? to Qld !ndo-Aryan.
(c) Dialect:~.l divergence-,.-the Standar:: Cnloai~ii.: 2i.A the
h.’amriipi d 7.. 3 1ect i n ps.rtiCIA1ar.
Part I:: !-.LtCr?.i-:lHistar:, and Lrtarary Criticism.
Frinci2lei: nf critic:.Sm–di fierent literary

‘i~t~~ary forms-development of trli f,:>t-ms in Gzsamese. Periods in the l.itersr;/ histsr:, from the earliest kr2:nnLnqs Lo maxlerri ti.:neE ui.ki-, their rocio-cultura; h;ril,~groc~,rid. The er-0to-As E.i*mer7,e paet,r:,’-t.be CharY i itI. Fre-5-3nI.4t -adey3 Poetr./. The Siilitina-.c renei+.?nce snd the effect of the Sanb:arade\,a mnvenienr ii@orfr?:;ca.neae life and letters. ‘he heginninr; af pr’Ij2.e-a poetica.1 varietit in dr3ma 3.nd in rendering:: of the Fihagsvata-Fur3na and Bhagavadgita, and a re?.li.=,tx,: v:?r-ict.,/ .in chroniclec, c3.lled Buranj1. The post-SanCaradexi?., rjeicadencz in literature. The ccmins of the BFitish I-ul~rsand American rniszioneries. The new forms of poetry, drama, fiction, biography, essay 2nd criticism.
PAPER I1

This paper will require first hand reading of the texts prescribed and will be designed to test the candidates critical abi 1 it:! Madhava Kandali Ra.mayana Sankaradeva F;CIkmini-ha rana
~.‘Kav:~~ Mataka)
and Madhavadeva E! -i rgit. Arjuna-Bh3 j ana-Na tak.a Vaiki.irnthan+tb Sita.-Katha. Phaga.va ta-lrstha Ph.. ttachar?/n
Ecok:. 1-11
Lak.. s hm ins th Baziaroa
FB cl manat.h Enh.in
Fe janrkanta Hardalai
Fanik.amata K&:. 5 ti
RENGFILI
PFIPER I
1. Histary of the Bengsli Language:
(i)Origin, and development of the language (ii Major dialects of Bengali (ii 1 Sadhu Bhasa and Chaiita Fhasa (iv Froblerns of standardization and reform with special
reference to spellinq system .slpliabet 3.nd tr.ms1iteration (Romani=a.t.ion;
2. Histor:. af Bengali Literature Students are expected tn be acquainted with !i! the histor:. of the Bengali ;-itarats..rrefrom the eir::.egt perlnd t-n the modern times
(ii)social and cu! tural backyroe..inc; ot L-enqa: i Literature,
(lii)Sane%ritic bacl-qroiind of ?.unaa! i lLiter;t!.ire iI+) fJe~t~:-r? nn Eenga! :-Llter-.?.tur+
Fn:lii.once
f ii1 Mcdern tvovds
~
PAPER I1
Fanalata Sen
CHINESE

PAPER I
PCIRT 1
(a)
Essay in about 500 Chinese Characters on a topica: subjsct. 90 marks.

(b)
Render a Chinese passage (about 400 Chinese Charsctersl into English 60 markg

(c)
Translate Chinese four words Phrase 60 marks Part IIfPuestionn must be answered in Chinese ?Q marks1 (dl Histor/ and 3ajor changes cf Chinese lsnguaqe

(b)
Four Tones.

(c)
Literature and Colloquial

PWER I1 This paper wili .require’ ‘ the randidates to have 3. good knowlodge of the contemporary Chrnese Literature and rill be designed to-test the candidates Eritical ability. !I) Literary Revnlution of Hay 4th 1917
(ii)
Critise the majar literary works. tEss&s and shart stories selected from "Readings in Contemporary Chinese Literature" Volumes I1 and 111 Yale University). (aj ,Hu Shih -:-"Ten’tative suggestions for the Reform 09 Literatureh

(b)
Lu Hum I-"Kung I-Chi" "The true story of Clh 0"

(c)
Ping Hoin :-"Letters to my young Readers"

(d)
Chu Tza-chin9     :-"The Rear View"

(a)Lao She :-"Hei Bal Li" "Rickshaw Boy"
(f )Ma0 Tun:-"Chwun Tran" ( Qucrtions fram the paper may be answered in English )
PCIPER I
Detailed etridy cf .* literary sgs (1?th cenfui-y) The paper wili cc$w?f the study af English Literature from 1798 tg 1900 with soecsa: ratrrencs ta the works QT Wordswort*. Coleridge, Shelley, Keatz, Limb, Uclzlitt, Thackeray .D~ckms,Tenrysm. RniJrrt Sr~wnivp. Gmnld. Georqs Eliot. Cab-lvle. Ruskin Pater Evidence zf f.rst-hmd readrnp i-ill be rcqcliroc!. Tha pace-rill be designed to test rlot 3~1~ knorledOe n+
the c:.mc!idatec the author-s pri3crlbed but a:so thrLr understanarng of the main 1itwar:f trcrldr durinq the peri.cJd. Questions having bearing on the rjccial ail cul$L-rral bacbgrmnd of the perioc; may be inc:ludrd.
PCIPER 1.1
This paper will reqi!irb fit-st-hand reading z* t-hr text prescribed and will be desipned to test the candidate’p criticai aaility.
1.     Shakespeare cls you like it:Henry 1V Part I & 11 :Hamlet, tkrc Tempest
-466-

2. Milton  Faradire  Lost 
‘Ir.  Jane Clust.en  Emma 
4. Wordsworth  The Fre1Me 
5. Pi.cLcna  David Cnpperfield 
.’2.  George €lint.  Middlemarch 
7. Hardr  ,l~~.dethe Clhscure 
s.  Ye*.t5  Ea.~ter191.6 
The Secand 
r3nmi.ng:  Py?antiurn 

A Pr*.yer f@r r4y Daughter Lsda and the Ywm
5′. El?c?t :     The Waste Lsnd The Rainbrrw
FRENCH
PFIPER I
Main trends in French literature
(a)
Classicism

(b)
The Romantic Movement

(c)
Evolution of the Novel in the 19th and ZCth Centuries (UptO 19401.

(d)
New dimensions in French.. Poetry in the ‘second half of the 19th century !from Baudelairs onwards). le) History and literary criticism as new literary form in the 19th century Candidates are expected to have a goed hnwledge af the soeic-historical background of tne period Note :-Tfiere will be twq questions in cart I1 one of which must be answered in Ccrnch ai-d one mi.:’ be answer-cd in English.

This paper will require firzt hand ras!dznp ai the text prescribed and ‘ wili bp designed tz test the candidatel critical milit:*.
1.
Robelais Ln Tiers Livre

2.
Corneille (a! Ls Cid

ibIFolyeuctc
3. Racina

.4. MOliQV?     In) Le Tartuffs (b! L’Pvars
PV. Voltaire !a) Candide

(b$ Zadig
6.
Roussesu Le Oontraot Socia?

7.
Victor Hugo (a1 Les Contemplations IbJ Les Chatiments

8.
Saint Exujery Vol de.Niut

9.
Malraux La Condition Humaine

10.
Apolinaire Alcools.
Note:-Buer,tion?e. from the paper should be answered in French.

PAPER I P4RT A
1.
Essay to be written in German (90 marks)

2.    
Translation from English into German (60 ma.rb.e! I t50 marl c-). FQRT 0 The paper rill wver the study of German Literatvre frm la*) to 1939 with swrial reterenee to the reureEentati’,e mthorg of tho most impc-trnt epochc duriog this perind. ‘:h:..: peper should exposi? th4r critical undcrstandinq of thee3 : .LterLir’t events and their social relevance.

The candidates rii11 hc\e to hare the . kn.dw!edge 0.f th? following 1it.ersI:y epochs-and their respective writers,
1.
Classical flqe. Gaethe, Schiler.

2.
Romantic Pgr with special refer,en.ce to Mine.

3.
The poetica; Readism: the wmrks of heller. Fontans, C.F.
Meyer.

4.
Naturalism :Hauptmann.

5.
Literature after.1949: Boll; Brmcht.
Note:-tdb questions will have to be answered out of which
one must k In German.

PAPER I1
The  candidate is expected  to have  a first-hand  b.r80w:;cz~e af 
the  original fext wid  should be  in a positicn  to  ~~;?~?r~rot 
the  reor-?centptive  workc,  of  the  German  author.;.  The 

candidate nust h3ve rear! the fol lowing text in German ,
1. Poems: by the representative poets cf the Romant:t.c period :Eichendor-f. Yci.r,e Eirent.ano ard 1Jnland Iand Goet.h’s p~entrow Sti-!rin-LW d-I)r.3nq perind .
PAPER I

PAPT 1
(a)
Hisrory of GuJerati Lafiqcrage with specla! t-r t-?ri>ce tc
New Indo-4ryan 1.e.: lsst one thousard yea<.
!b) Significant features of the grammer of the languaae.

(c)
Major dialects/varieties of the language.
FART I1

(a)
Literary History-Fre-Narsingh and Fost, Narsingk.
Literature. Fandfit Yu3. Gandhi Yltg and Post–Independence
period.
(Dl Literar:, r:riticism :-Deve!apmcnt of Gujarati Critic.ism-

the
Cn
iri
the
PAPER I1
This  paper  wi!!  require first-hand  reading  of  the  te%.:%s 
prescrihed  and *%ill  tie  designed  to  tert  the  r.ani?idat.ec 
critical abilit.,. 

1.     Fremanand 1.Nalekhyan Ed. bv Magnabhai D~ai Na; jivan Prak.ashan Mavdir. Ahmedabad-14 @I-an:. other Editinn.
2.     Kunvarbainuram Mameu Ruri Ed. by Magnabhai Desai, Navjivan Prhkac-han Mandir, Ahmedabad-14 or an.: other edition.
2.     Shamal 1. Madan Mohan Ed. by Dr. H.C. Bhayani or any other Edition.
3.     Narmad 1. Nwmadhu Padya Mandir Ed. by
V.M. Bhrtt.
4.     6ovcrdhandrsm i.,Saraswvatichandrs Vol. I Q I1 Tripathi.
3.     K.M. Munshi 1. @uja+at .Nav Nath Pub. Gurjai-Qranth Patna Yaryalaya, Clhmedabnd.
2.     Kaka-Yichashi-Pub. clo above.
6.     Nanalal 1. lndu Kunar Vo?. 1
2. Vishvagceta
7.    
Kant: 1. Purvalrp

8.    
Bandhij;: 1. CItmakatha

2.     Manpal f?rabhat

9.    
Ramnarayan 1. Divrephnivatc, Vol .1 Pathak.

2.     Flrvaclhin r’avya Jahityafla Vahem
HINDI 
PAPER I 
1. Histar:. of Hindi Language. ti) Grammatical and Lexica; *eatur.ee, of Apabhransa, and early Hindi. (ii) Evolution of Rvadhi Snd Braj Bh*a as literary during the PIedieval period (Lii) Evolutioir of Khari Soli Hindi. 3% LitcrWy  Arahat’..i Languzqe Language 

during the 19th century.
(iv)
Standardization of Hindi Langage with Devanagri Script.

(v)
Development of Hindi as Rastra Fhasa during the Freedom
Strugg1e.
(vi! Development of Hindi as official language of Indian
Union since Indeomdence.

(vii) Major Diali.cts of Hindi and their inter-re1 ationship.
(viii! Significant grammatical features of stand+rrj Hindi.
2.History of H2.n-lJ. Literature
(3.) Ch.ief char..r:teri~ti=s of thr major period,: ~.fHlndl
Literattire: viz. Adi C::sl Fhakti Kal, Niti kal. Ehartendu Kal

~
arid Dwivcxli Kal, etc. ,’
,ii) Signific3rgt. featlures crf the main I,iter3r? trends an’? tendencies i.n Pladerv Hindi:’diz. !Zhtia:?:-acf Rahar:.’avad. Fragati’Jad. F’rn.;,xj\/ad. R(s:;,i. Kavita? i\lax:i b’ahani. Aiia~iitaetc. i.iii) Rise af Nr,fel and F’ealisfn in Modern Hrndi.
(2.v) A brief hi=tory of theatre and dra.ma in Hindi.
(v) Thcarics n1 ?.itera!-). criticism in H~ndiand Ma.jr:i-Pindl literary critic-;I (vi j. Origin snd development of Iltorar:, 3enr~rin blindi.
PAPER I1
This pa.per k;il.l require first-hand reading of the text prescribed and will be designed to test the candidate’s critical ability. C:GAIR:C:ARIR GRGNTHAVGLI by Shyam Sunder Das(2OO Stanzas from the beginning)
SURDAS:BHRCIPlARA BEET SAAR (200Stmzaa from the beginning
only)
TULSIDAS: RAMCHMITMANAS inygdhybkand only). KAVITAVALI
(uttarakamd only)
BHQRATENDU HAR ISHCHQNDRA :ANDHER NAEAR I
PREM CHAND :QODAH, MANSCSROVM(9HRG EK)

JCIYASHANYER "PRASAD" CHANDRR QUPTP, KAWCIYANI (Chinta,
Shradha, Lajja & ida only).
RAMCH!INDRP SHUKLR; CHINTAMfiNI(PfIHILABHAG rlV Essay from the
beginning)
SURYAkANT TRIPATHI NIHALA; &NfiW:KCI(Sarof Smriti.Ramki Shakti
Pooja onl:t!.

5.H. VATSYCIYfiNAGYEYA: SHEGHCIF Er. JEEVfiWI(TWO PARTS) . GAJANAN MAUHAV MUKTXSODH: CHPND YA MUKH TERM HEIfAndhere men only).
KANNADh
PWER I
Section 1 History of Kannada Language. What is lanpuage? Cl’assificatian of ianguage: General characteristic of Dravidian lan’guaqes: Comparative and contrastive features of Kannada and other Dravidian lanquages:. Ksnnada Aiphabet: Scme salienf features of Kannada Grammer;qender number, case verbs, tense and pronouns. Chronological stwes of Kannada language; influence of other languages on Kannada, Language Borrowing and Semantic changes; Iiannada Language and its
dialects, Literary and colloquial style of Kannada. Section 11-History of Kannada Literature The iiteratures Jf the loth, 12th. 16th, 17th, 19th and LSth centuries are to be studied against their social religious and political backgrounds. And the following literar;, forms of Kannada with reference to their origin. development and achievement have to be critically studied on the basis of the poets listed belnw : Campu : Fampa Ranna. I’J+./asena. Harihara Jsmma. Andyya, Tirn ma1a;yya and Sodak.esari.
Vacana : 
Devar- das.imat,::ra,  Paz,ava  and  his  cnntempnrariec 
Tontadasiddhal inga.. 
Rag., 1e: 
Harihara~  Sri~ivasa’navaratri’  Kuvempu  citrangada  and 
Sriramayandaralcinam 
Satpadi: 

Raghavanka, K!-invdendu. Camarssa. C-:umaravyasa. Toravenarahari
-Laksmisa and Viru~akasapandita.
Sangatya:
Deparajasi~umay~~.n?a Naniunda., Ranakar-gavar-ni Honamma.

~
Frose:
Sivai.:oti Camcidaraya Harihara, TirumalaryaI Kempcinarayana and Muddana.
Section 111-Poetics The functional diTferancer of poetics and criticism. Definitions and aims of poctry;Enunciation of thesis of the various c-rhools of Poetry; Alankara Riti, Vat.rokti Raga, Phvani and Aucitya, Definition and discusrion of Raoasutra of Pharats; Diqcuscim gf the number of Rasa. Aesthetic experience the nature Of genius, theary af inspiratinn, 1ma3ery, pevchical distance of fundamental principles. Imagery, psychical distance .af fundamental pcincigle= ct criticism the quaIitifiEations of a Sahrsdaya end the critic. ..%hdrecent forma of Kannada literature. Section T!.J -Cu1turrI History nf Karnatok Karnntak culture apa&t Indian backgrot-lnd; Clntiquit-! of Kornatak .a1kitrej & bray acquaintancr of rhe +o;lowirrg rfy~ast-ia~of h:wns.tgk: CSIL~~YASd Sadmri and Kalyano. Rastrakvtas: Foyaalas ard Vi!ayanag<ir.: Kings. Relzgiiaus Ilo-ements in Karnetak, Sac!ai canditions. Act and 4rrhitectlIF!?. Freedom Wr,.eaent in i:arnatak. Unificatioc c~fKarnatak.
PCWER  I 
The  papep- will  reouire.  first-hand  reading  o.f  the  text 
Frescribed  and  will  be deeignl?d t’o  test  the  candidate’s 
eriticz1  biZIty  . 
Section 1 

Old Kannada:(Halagannda) hdiiuranasangraha: L: Eundappa: Vikramarjunavijaya (Cantos 9 nnd’i0 1
Section I1 Middle Kannada: (N. Dugannada) Rasavannanavara ‘;acanaqalu Dr. L. Basavaraju. Published by Gita Pool: House. Mysore-1. Pasavai-ajdevara Ragale: Edited by
T.S. Venk.annaij ah. Harisca,ndra C:.a.ya sanyraha : Edited b:,
T.S.  Venkannaijah  and  A.R.  Kr.ishna=astri. 
lJdyogaparvasangr,~.ha:  Edited  bv  T.S.  Shamaraa  Far3marthiI 
(Vacanas  of  Sarvanjiha Edited  b::  Dr .  L.  BacavarajLI  Gita 

Huctse. Mysore. ( 1 to IV )Cantos).
9h~.ratesavaibhava~an3r~ha Section IIi Modern Yannada:(Horagannada! Poetr:i :Kann-lda Vav~ta: Edited by !3 V . 5rik an thaiah . C ann;?da–Kavyazangrha : Or. U.4. Rnantha Murth; Nati.onal Bank:. Trust. oi India. Sa.nkramana Hoca Kavya: Edited by Candrazek.har-a Patil and others, Novel: Malegala! 1i Madumagalo: li.uvempi-i Cammanadcidi: Sivaram
ran ta I Ah3rtipi.:ra,: 1J.R . FSn a.n tam?..! rthy . Short Stor;/ : C::ar:n?dada Atrynttsma Sanns k:athe galu: Editrxl hy K. Nsrnshimha.rmc!rthy.
~
t4atak.a-Drama: 9.–sthaman : B.M. Sri Beragek.ors1 C:i..i.;empu
Essay : Hossganada Frabhanda Sankalana:
Edited by Goruru Ramaswamy Ayyirngar.
Section IV
Folk: literature :Earatiya-hadu Ed.by Cannamal lappa and other.
Jivanajokali (Part 111) garatiyar garime). Edited try Dr.

M.S. Sumkapur Belgaganva-j illeya : Janspada-ka the galu: Edited by T.S. F‘ajappa. Nammasuttina gadcgalu: Edited by
Sudhakara. Nammaopatugslu 8 Edited by Ragow ( Rame Oowda).
KCISMIRI
PCIPER I
l(a)Origin and Development of the Kashimiri Language:
(i)Early Stages (Before La1 Ded):
(ii.1. La1 Ded and After; ‘(iii)
Influence of Sanskrit and Persian.
(b)
Structural features of the Kashrniri Language :

(1)
Sound Patternc-e

(ii)Morphological iormatjon:
(iiilsentence Structure.

(c) Dialects/Varistsons of the Casbmiri Language :

2. Literary History and Criticism :
(a Llterary traditions and a~vemcnta; folk and classicisl
background: Shaivrsm. Rishi Cult; Sufism: Devotional Verse;
Lrricism Particularly L.0; (L) Mcsnavi Narrative.

(b) soeio-cultural inf 1i:ences;SoCial ,-political verse
(ineludirrq the Progresive! and the contemporary’development.

3. Development @fgenrerz
:i) Uaskh Phruk Vastum:!Shakr; Ladee Shah; Marriyffi Lo,I;
Manoavi Leelaa; Naat, Gbazal, Aazaad Nxm, Rubaa’y. Tukh
Opera Sonnet.

(ii) Paa’thu’r’ Naatukh; Plfseaunii; Haquaalu; Tanqueed Mizah
and Tanz.

This paper will be requlre first-hand readlny of the next
prescribed and will be designed to test the candidate i
critical ability.
1.LAL DED fCultura?)

academy) 2.NOOR NAGMA of Yund Rishi (C.R.) 3.Shamas Faqir: Ljelectios (C.A. 1 4.Gulrese of Maqbool Kraalawaa.ri (C.G. > 5.SODANl–TSGRETHof Parmanand
f :ran Partmnand’s Complete Work-,
published by C.A.) (can.1
b. CUITYAAT-I-NF~DIM fC.0. 7.RASUL MIR (Selzctions, published by C.F.!
8.MAHJOOE( Selecticlns put!1ished by C.A. 1 q AAZACID !8e1cctionB 1
I
10.PZ ICHI Kaa ’ shit-i Nazamu 1i.a’ ZYUCKAR’SHI.JR PFSAANU
12.KAA’ SHUR NASF; 13.SUYYA br Ali Mohd. lone 14.TSHAAY by Noti La1 kemu
19. D.0.-DDAG by Ak:.htar Mohiud-Din 16.UKHDO: R.by Bmsi Nirdosh 17.MYIJL by G.N. Gauhar
10. LAVU’TAPRAVU by Amin Ka.mFl
19. F‘QTA LAAHAAN PARBATH by Hari Krishan Kaul. 20.MANIKAPMAN by Muzaffar Aa:im
21. MARSIY (Edited by Shahid Badagami).
PCIPER I
(all. The early phase.of Plal3yalam and its characteristics as
evidenced  bv  the  racmstruction of  proto-South  Dravidian 
Languaaes.  The  six  characteristic  tsaturers  Inayaas)  as 
enumevated  by  Keralw  Pdnini  (cI.P.  Raja  Raja  VJrm%)  in 

relation tc Tamil; The critical review .If the six na!.raas in relation ta other Dravid:.ar! Langaaqer like Kannada Tull.: etc.
11. The li*gviat.ic f?+.tvrac af the works E: the paattu school iiV.e Ramscaritem md their evclertim AS reflected in the latter uo~csof his cateqory.
111. The linguistic features cf the Manipravcala schocl beginnirnj +rnm the eari) Sancieese upt@ th& f5th
r’a~v~ay~s cerrtury, &’.EQ prgst= wc1-L.s liLo 3hzann Kautalivam am! the rat-?.! inscr-iptimb. 11:. :he :inquizti= +es.C::ras of thr i?digsnolas Eehool qmpriai2q the ear!:? ‘zlk literaturz.
V. Tke iinauistic featdrec of the wcwks of Niranam posts
which inteacats elements .=? Paattu. Manfpprovaa:a nnil the
indigenous schools.

VI. The! characteristic features of the modern phase as
represebted by Krirhnagatha anc w0rV.o of Ezhuttacchna’ and
others.
(b)’Significant features of the Grammrr of the language.
The linguistic importance of Lirlaatilakam.
The contributions of indigenous grammarians like Geqorm,

Mathana, Kovunni Nedungari Pachu Muuthathc!, fi. .R. Raja Raja
Varma and Seshaqiri Frabhu.
The contributicn of European grammarians like Jn8-jph Feet.
Drummond. 6irnder.t. Frohen Meyer .
(ci The charactcristic feature nf the dialects as menticned
in Liilaatihkkamn md is commentary the caste dialects of
Malaralam and those spok.en in the Laccsdive I~landc.
&7nCalOre, Falqhsnt and Southern psrts sf the Tri..*,ndrL!m

d iJtriet.
PAR’ I1 Litrrar;. Histar-., -cri. ticl.!m etc. This comprises ki;e c-it~calstctd?, nf anrf t.heir de\eIaoments frem earl;,, to
1.. The early %iterar:: mavementa iric ;rnd Munipra.vaala.
2.
Gaatha

3.
Filippaattu

4.
Ch3mpu

5. Rttab:.atha.
6.
Thcrllai

7.
The Mahakaav-. 3 and the K:hand&kav:.,a. €3. Trends in modern poe-tr’y.

9. Development of drama. novel.. short st52ry. bioqrsph;, trarelouge and other creative prose werl..r.
PAPER I1
This paper will require first hand reading of the text
prescribed and will be designd to test the candidate’s
critical ability.
1.
hnnasan tdania Paniksr) (Kannassa Rsn~a-yaana Baalakamtam).

2.
Chersvrieri erishs.n Gaatha, quknnrni Suyaavaram! .

3.
Ezthuttaeehan [Maha Bharitam-~ar~aparam).

a. Kunchan NambiarlEalyaana Saupandhikaml
5.
Ker3ld VAraalMnyur-a SandesamY.

6.
Kumrrm F?E~ Isits). ‘?. Va?lathol (Maqdalana :lariyam).

8.
1!1 lonr 5. Parimeswars ism+(P.&nQ6lai.

9.
Chandu 6Inon ( Inau?bk hai .

10.
C.V Riman Pi’lfai IRamsra’Ja Fnhadur)!

MCIRATHI
PCIPER 1
LMJaUCIGE, HISTORY OF LIThFITURE &IUD LITERMY CRITICISSI
Section 1 :LANGUCIGE
(a)Ths origin and +evelopment of Marathi !in brGrd cL!tl:u6)
(b)The majar dialects of Marathi.

(c)
General outline ~f Marathi Erammer.
Section 11: History of Literature
The impo?tant movemer.te in the HiEtory of literaturs .~rs to
be st.udisd relating them, wherever possible, to the thusht,
currents,md the social life of the period.

(a)
From the beginnicgs to 1818, with spekinl reference to
the following movements: The Mahanubhawas, the Eheb L-i Cult,
the Pandit poets, the Shahirs.

(b) From 1818 to i960, with special reference to the
developments in the following forms: poetry,drama, the novel,
the short story.
Section 111: LITERARY CAITICISM
The follgwing problems in literary criticism are to be
studied.
Sahitvache Swarcop (The NatLire of Literature
Sahityache Prayn ian (The Function of Literature,1
Sahityanirmitichi Frakriya (The Creat~i’ie Process!.
Sahit!a Ani Sam+.:_i (Literature and Society j
Sahituachi Fhasna (The use nf Language ir: Literature).
Sahik\/atil Nava.t 3 (Mndernity in Literature!

PAPER I1
Thi.s p-3.pPr wll L req1.ii.t-e first-hand re3dincj of the text5
prescribed and will be desiqed ?:o test the cmdrdats’s
critical abilit:, .
( 1ii.:h3imbhntta:’Leer3charit.ara.’ EI;av I. 3,

(2)Tutaram, Ti:’*.aram Darashan, ArthatI Abhangvani Prasddha Tuka:,achi"!Edite,J b:~6.B. Sardar: Ft-1.b Modern Book Depot.. Pune)
(7) Moropant, Virat Farva. Sh1oC.b
(4)H.N. Apte: Fm Lakshat C’on Eheto: Vajraghat
(5) R.G. Godkari CGovindaqraj ) :Vagvaijayanti: Ekach P;/-lla (61 V.S. Khandekhar : Vayalahari, k:raunchva,dh’
(7)h.R. Deshpande(Ani1): Phagnamurti, Sangati
(8) F.S., Mardhekar: Mardhekaranchi Kavita, Pani.
(91 P.L. Derhpandc: Tuzs khm Tujpamhi Khogirbharrti .
(10)Vyankatesn Madgulltar : llandeshi Manase;. Ka1.i Al:..
ORIYA
PCIPER I
HISTORY OF LANGUAOE AND LITERATURE

PART 1 
Histor!  of  Oriya Language: 
faloripin and development of the? Language. 
(blsigniflcant  features  of  the  grammer  of  the  language 
(Phonetic=  and  Phonemics,  Oerivaticnal  and  inf lectronal 

affixes Cunjugaticn 07 verbr case inflection, Sandhi,
Striicturo of sartences!.
tc! Oriya diolecta-Wastern Oriyd~ Southern Oriya, Desia and
Dhatri ntc.
PART I1
History or i3riya Literature.
An outline stuuY Gf the history ot the literature from
earliest period to the modern times with emphasis on the
following topics.

(1) Religjcuz bachr,round of CJriye Litteritct-e.
(3)Westerri inf luencc on Oriya Literature.
(3)
Typical fo~ms of ald and medieval portry(Ch+utisz, Poi koli Choupadi, Champu, etc.)

(4)
Develnpment of Oriya Prose Literature (51 Modern trends in pockry, drama, novei, short story and literary criticism.

PAPER I1

This paper. ni!l require first hand reading of the text prescribed and will be designed to test the candidate s critical ability.
1. Jaganatha Dasa (Bhagavat, XI Khanda) 2.Dino Krushan Dasa (Rasa Kallola)
3.
Brajanat Badaiena (Samara Taranga, Chatura, Binoda!

4.
Radhanath Rai (Chflka, Bibmki)

3. .Fakir Mohan Senapti (Mamu. Fltma, Jibani, Charita. Galpa Salpanl.
6.
Goprl Chandre PrAharaja fBai Mananti Panji).

7.
Kali Charana Pattanayak fabhijana, Rik.tamati. Phatabhuin)

8.
GaJoinath Maha?ti (Paraja, Mati Matel)

0. Satchi Rantr-s.k IPallisri, Pandulipi, Kabita 1952).
10.
Sursndra Mahanti (Maralara Mrutvu, (Kruehna Chudal .

11.
Pt. Nilakantw Das (Konarke, Arya JIbanel

12.
Dr. Mayadhar Mansinha (Hearsasya, Saraswati FrkirfPlohan).

PWER I There will be tour sections: (I> (a) Origin and dmvclopment of the language ( a general outline only, from the Indo-European ta the Middle Indo-Wyan languages). Its homeland and the main characteristics.
(b) Salient features of the grammer with particulars emphasis
on Sandhi, Karska. Vibhakti, Samasa, Itthiprccaya, Apaccr ( bodhakal -pac-caya. Adhikara (Eoddhakal -. .paccaya a,nd Sankhaya f bodhrka) -paccaya..
2.
General knowledge of the history of the literstui-c. (Pitaka literature and post pitaka literature ). Princrpal forms of writings including analytical compocitions (Meiti.paC+rana, FEtakopedesa, Milindapanha1. Chronicler ( Dipavensa, Mahevansa etc.) Commntatorial expositicns Qtthakathas of Budhata, Budhaqhosa and Dhammapala), oriqin and develnpmsnt of literary penr-es inclindiny Epic, *t-.?%! Kdvya, Lyric and Rnthol.jgy.

3.
Esstsntirls of pre-guddhistic and post-Buddhistic India Culture end PhFlos.cph? with special reference ti, t1.T: four Noble TrlJthg. :Cattsri Uriyassc?ani!. Ti?akkh’ana fDi.ikktw

Ana.tta IP.~ Aniccs) 3r;d four +bhidhammi: parasaitth a!: (Citn, Cstasika, RUEZ and Nibbnna).

4.
Short assay in pali (bozied un Budhistic :hrmes onl.y(Quectinns nn Sectian !3\wd (4: to be a-swrred in palil,

PCIPER I1
Thers will be two sectiocs:
1. Genersl study of the following wor-bs:
!a! hahabaqqa
(b)
Cullavaga

(c)
Patimokkha.

(d)
Dighamkaya.

(e)
Hajihirnanakayya.

(f Samyuttanikaya. 
(0) Dhammapada. 
(h) Suttaniprta. 
ti.) ‘Jataka. 
(j1 Theraqstha 
(k) Theigatha 
(1) Dhammasanpar: 
(m) Kathavatthu 
tn) Millindapanba 
!o)Dipavansa. 
( p1 Mahavan& 
(q) Ptthasalini. 
(r1 Visuddhimapca 
(9) Pbhidh+mmatt.+msangaho 
(t) Telakatrhagatha 
(u Subodha lanka ra 
(vl Vouttobnya. 
2. Evidence of. the first-hand readinq  of  tc.e  fullowinl 
selected texts !Te:!tuai questions kill be a sked  frmn  the 
portions men+.ioned against each test): 
(1) Mahrvagga !Trhakhsndhaha only) 
(ii)Dighaniksve (Samannaphala-sutta cniyl 

(‘iii). and .litthi-
llaj ihimaFikaya IMulapariyaya-Sutta Ga8is;i. Sutta). (iy) Dhaaunapada (Yamaka Vagga mlyl
(v)
Suttanipata (Uraga Vagga only1

(vi)
Milindapanhe (Lakkhsnapanho only)
(vii.)Mahrvansa (Pethama-sangiti, Dutiya-Sangiti and Tativa-

SsngitiI.
(viii) Viculdhimagqa [Sila-nidder* only).
(ix)
Abhidhsrnmatthasan.qaho.
Ncte to item No. 2:11) Questions carrying inir,imum 25 perc-wlt
marks should be answered in Pali.

(2)
Fassagc5 for translstion and annotstion will be salectsd
only from the portions givm above within parenthesis.

PERSIAN
PWER I
(I) (a! lJrigin and devslopment ‘of the :=i;:quagr_. iin autlinei.
tbl SLjrii+.icanr-.featurec crf t.hs grsminor of the lsngwage Phetnrici Prosow.
2.
L: torary Yistwy md Literary CT?trcism-Literary inomnenta. r?aasical bachgrcund: Sacio-Cc!: xr3.l .Lr~+lc!ences and Moderr! trends; Origin 2nd devsloamsnt pi. modern 1lterarZ genrer, ivcliiding drama, novel, short story. essay.

3.
Short. Essay in Persier?.

(ikl Dastan Vizanba Manizs.
PAPER I1 
This  ~alirrwill  require first -hand  reading c;f  the  texts 
prescribed  and  will  br  designed to  test  the  candidates 
critical ability. 
1.  Firdausi. 
Shah Nama 
(i) DdstNI  Ruetam  wa  Suhrab. 

2.     Nizaami Aruzi Samarquadi. Chahar Maciala.
-,
.> .     Khay;’am, Pahaiyat (Radif Alif .Ee,DaP).
4.    
Minu-cheheri-Qasaid fRadif Lam and Plim.)

5.    
Maulana F:!.)m Masunawi( 1st Vol.1st half 1.

6.    
Sadi Shii-:,..-.i.
Gulistan

I
7.     Amir h::hL!5 t-act . Majmua-i-nawawin Irhurrau (Hadif Alif and T*!,
8.

".
10.     F?har kchhsdi. Diwan -i-Cahar! 1 Vnl.. )! 1st ha1.f:I.
11.     -rawal ZddFSh.
Yakn     Buc! \.’ale Na Bvd.
FUNJAR I
PAPER I 
1.  !a)  @ri.:in  and  development  nf  the  langua?e  -t!-.e 
deveioment  of  tanee  from voiced  aapir-ater and  older- .v&lc 
accent-the  geminates-the  interaction  of  F’unjabi  vowels  and 

tones-Consonantal mutation in Punjs.bi from Sanskrit to Frakrit and Funiabi. (bl The number -gender system-animate and inanimate-concord
-diWarent catmgories of postpositions-the notion 09 "eubj ect"and "obJ ect" in Punj abi-Gurumukhi orthography and Punjabi word formation -noun and verb pharases-Sanstmcm structure-spoken anl written styles-sentence structure in prase and poetry.
(e) Majcr dialects Pithohari. Multani Majhi,Doabi, Malwai Puadhi-the nations of dialect and idiolect -dioglossis and isoglosses-tho Validity of speech variation on the basis of social stratification .-the distinctive features with special
ref erencs tc tmea ,of the various dialects-Why 115 11 11 h"I*t,mer"and "kowe1s"interact in dialects of Punfabr?
Classics1 backgrounaiNath :gqi Sahi.
Litersr: movements: Eurmat .:?!uf i hissia and Var ‘Literrture.
Modern Trends: Ramantics and Prc)qressivo (Mohan CJinqh, Amrita FF:t-..m ,Bawa 3e..:.want,Pritrlr Sit?sh. Safeer) . Experirertrlista: (des8ir S.fililuwalia, liavinder Ravi. Silkhpal. vip Singh iiasrrt;: Clesthstes:!HarbiW bn ZZngh,Tara Sinqh , Silrhbrr Singh! .Nec-PrGgr-sssrves: (Cash apd Pntari .
Socia a!tural Influensee: 1n:’luences of English, SaiEkrit. Persian, IJrdu and Hindi an "unjahi. Origin 8 Devslomrnt of CcrnreE Epic.(Danadar;Waris Shah Mohammad, Vir SFngh.kvtar Sing3 elzad,Mohan Si~gk!.
Drsma:11.C.Nanda,  Hwcharan  Sinqh,Balwsnt  Gargi.. 
S.S.Sckhan,  L .S.Duggal) 
Novel:(VirSinqh,Nanak  Singh,Sahan  Singh  Seetal,  Jaswant 
Singh  Kanwal.K.S.buggal,S.S.Narula,  Qurdie.1  Singh,Mahan 
Kahlon 1. 

Lyrics: (Gurus. Sufis and Modern LyriStS-MohJn Singh Amrita Fritam, Shiv Ccim3r, HarbhaJan Singh).
Essays: (Puran Singh,Te~a SLnqh,GvrbaCsh Singh),
Li tecary Criticism: (3.S.SeLhon Jasbir. S.An1ciwa 1la. Attar Singh. k’ishan Singh. Hat-bhalm Singh).
Folk LiteraturrJ: Folk Songs,Folk. tales, Riddles Proverbs.
PAPER IT
This paper w:!i reqciire first -hand reading of the text: prescribed and will be designed to test .the c?ndia*tec critical ability.
1.
Sheikh Far-i-r.?: The camplete bani 3.z incli.Ided in the Ad1 Grmtha.

2.
Guru Nansk:.: Selected writings r.i Gi.!ru Nanak erititled Furti. Nanab Fsni. Ed.EIhar Jndk Srnah pcit!li.e,Iied by Pl\i,.tional Book Trust of India.

.T. Cjhah Iii!sc;;in:i..:afian
4. Warich Shah: Hrer.
S. Shah Mohammad:Jang-ama. Jang Sivghan te Fsr?.ngian.
C,. Vir Singh (Poet) :Matab: lH-!!a.rs.Fana S~.!.rs+ 9irich.

E:a19idh.3r Cham,?tk.ar .
7.
ManaC: Slngh (Novelist! :Chitta Lahu. ”av~.ttar F’apj.,El.. Miya.n do Telwaran,

8.
Gurbakch Sinph !Essavist)Zindgi d.i Ras.Manii1 dis
Pai ,Merian Abhul Yadaan.

9.
Balvant Garc~i(Dramatist): Loha kutt., Phuni-di-egg .Sultan

Razia.
10. Sant Singh Sekhon (Critic):Damyanti, sahityarath, Baca
FIsman.
RUSSIAN
PFIFER  I 
(F)  Eass?  mark.s 
(ri)Prcria  60 mark:.= 
P.Literarv  history  and  litt?r.3ry  criticism- ~it~rar:, 
movements.  Rommtism  Critical  raa:.izm?  socialis?  r?s!  ?m: 

Socio-Cultirral inf iuence and mooerq trends, C!riq:n and development of litsrary qeqrecr-i;?r:ludinq. epic. dr<am,?, noye? short story. lyric.essay.fnl1.. lit~r;.t_urr 1130 marks) ,.
Note:Thers will be tiio questions sf wh.Lch at least one will
have to
1’1 snsweredbe
Ruc=ian.
FAFER I1
1-his paper wlll reguire first-hand re:?.?inq of th.3 *te::t prec-cribej and wiil b~ desi.gned to tcz-st the c2njidates
critical  qbilit’,t= 
1=A. S.Ql.ibb:.in: !i1  Evgen;,  Onegin i I,: ) Prcnzr:  Hcr~c~ien. 
2.M.U.  Lrrmontow:Hera  of  aur  time, 
3.N.V.Gogn:  : Gear:  sbu1.s 
4.1 .S.TLi.rgenov:Fathers  md  Sons. 
5.F.M. DostcwJsk?:  Crime and Punishment. 
6.L.N.ToLstoy:Anna  Karenina. 
T.A.P.Chek.hov:(i)  Cherrv  Orchard  (i.1  War’d  I.:o  6. 
8.A.M. Gork.~y  !i!Lower-Gepth.i. 

(ii)Mother 
9.B. B.Maykovnk.y  tifYou 
(ii) Cloud in Pants. 
(iii)V.4.Lenin (iv) Good. 
10.M .Sholok.hov  (il !kite Flows the Don. 
!ii)Fate of  a Man. 
Note:  Cluestions  from  this  paper FjhcmSd  be  answered  in 
Russian. 
SCINSKR IT 

PCIPER I
There wil 1 be fol..ir- sections-
(1)(a) Origin and development of lang;i.age (from Indo-European to middle Tndo-Aryan languangesi !!hner?.i octlino on1.y).
(b) SiTnificant featLire5 of the arsmmar with particular-stress an Sandhi C.ar.al-a.Samasa and ‘:ach:.,+ !Vo.icei .
(“1 Generai I,.rinwledge ot lrtei-ary history and pr?.nciplei trends of 11ternry criticism.Ckiqin and development trmds of iiterary criticism.Urigin and devel @omen+ @t 1iterary ,geners. including eplc .drama Iprose, kavya, i\/*-icar?iJ Anthology.
(3)ESSentidlZ. ?f Ancient Indian Culture and ph1.1@5nph:! with
special     stress on: Varnashrama Vyvastha,Sans~~.aras principa1
and phi losoohical trends.
(4) Short essay in Sanskrit.
Note:Questions on sections (3) and t4)are to be answered in Sanskrit.
PWER I1
(1) General study of the followi g wr3rk:,+:
(a)
Cathopanisad.

(b)
Bhagavadgrta
( c! b.id hachari ta- ( ksvztghosha

(5) !?a?+ 1.
G.u~narac~ar-3.ts-r!3i,nrji

!t! F:-,,bodhachandro~??.~-~ Plrsr-.).
6riahna
(2) Evideiice of irrst hone readina of the fe?lcwi~gSelectE.r! te:.: ts:-
Texts for readi.ng (te::tual questions will be asked from these portions only.)
1.
Kat.hopanishad 1 Chapter 111 Valli-Verses 10 ?? IS.

2.
Bhagwatgit,a 11 Chapter (13 to 25 vevses)

5. Budhscharita Canto IllTl to 10 verses).
4.
Svapna Vasavadattarn(bthAct)..

5.
Abhijnms ShaC.untalam (4th Act. 1

6.
Meghaduta (1 to 14 cjpening verses.).

7.
hirttarjuniyam ilst ranto).

8.
Uttara R3nacharitam (3rd Act).

9.
NitishataLa (1 to 10 verses)

10.
Ir’adambari (ShuC:anasopadesha).

11.    
k..auti!va i4rthasastra.-1 Adhik.arana: FraLarana-3r’ Adhyaya tatra

entitled:Vidvaramudd~~.a~.
anviksiki~thapana and VII Prak.arana-11th Adh!/a-a ent :tlel: Gudhapurl_lsot.pattii-i. Frer-cribed edition-, R .?.k an3le. the !..al.itil~:!a. Artha~-,ntra.Pnrt I. A critical edsticn: M.?t.i!-.l Eanar-zidass. De1I-. .I935I
Note to item No..: cluestions rarr:.ring. minimum of 27 per cent mark= shai!ld te ?ri-,wer-Pd in Sanzkrit.
SINDHI

PRPER I
(11 (a) Origir and developmeqtaf the sinrlhi lanquage-different views.
(b) Significant features of the Sindhi language elementrv knowledge of the phunological and qrammatical structure of Sindhi.
(c)
Ma.jqr dialects cf the Sindhi language.

(d)
Sindhi Vocabulary-stages of its growth.

(el scripts used for Sindhi and their dev?l,p,nen%. (21 (a1 Development of Sindhi literature: Earl:. Medieval. and modern periods.
ib! Sacis-cu:tural ii7:luence on Sindhi. literatl~re In
different p’zrlGdS. 
(c)  Origion  end  development of  li’ierar\/  geners  in 
Sindhi:Foetry,  Short  story,~-~ovel,drama,  essay  critic.i%n, 
bioqaphy . 

(d) ‘Sindhi fo?i.     folk, fcl:
l~t~~~,tt~i:~:hc711a~5.songs,
tales pro ;r-rbs.
~
tatif La,.? (Selections from .Sh,ali)
2. Sami
0.1     ishinrhsnd Eewas Shalt-Rewar (F’oems)
5.Nareyan Shrsm Mask Hhina Kaabel
(F’oemr1
4.Yotchand Noorjahan (Novel) Gurbuxani Muqadame Latifi
CEssays).Rooha Rihana (Folk,Literature)
7.Ram Fanjawani     Aohe Na Aahe fNovel)
9. Assanand Mamtora Shair (Novel)
9.M .U.Ma1k ani Jiwan Chahichita (Flays) EhurKhubita Fya TJ.mk.ani (Fla~s>,
10.Tirth Pasint     Vac,an.l-a VarC:ha (Essays1 .
11.H.t.     1.Rangen Rubai:/oon
Sad*rangan1 (F0etr.l1 2.Fakhaain C’.ana (Esraya)
12.Govind Maltri Sindhi Choonda and kala C:ah.n::oon if’ctb. by RaIasing han I Sahit;/a Pk?demi) (ED). !Short Stories!,
FAPER I
l.(a> Origion anif development of Tamil languaae:
(1)
A short sketch on the major languaae families in Jodi-,: tile place of T2mrl among the Indran langi_rapes in qcneral anlj Dravidian in particular,v?rious opinions about the affiliations of Dravidian 1a.ngctagez. Geoyraphi~cai psition arrf distribution of Tamil. Etymologicai hictcry cf the worl’i Tami1;Qrigin and the, development of Tamil Script.

(2)
Major changes in sound and grammatical structuro from Proto -Dfavidien to Tamil: mz.jur ch,+.nges in the sovnd. grammatical systems and lexical items of Tamil fmm Sangam age to modern period as evidenced through various laterary and inscriotional sources.

(3)
Development of Tamil in the modern period.

1. (bl Signiticant features of the prammar ot Tamil:
(1)
-The significance of three-fold classification of Tam11

(3)
The important role pleved by varims verbal and relative participles in the structure of Tamil Sentences.

(4)
The structure of verb ahrases and noun phrases. (51 Mcrphology at nouns. verbs, adjwcti.,e and adrarba.

(6)
The sound system of Tamil, identifics+ioo of ma3imE’-and their distributim. The s!t?labic petteeps, major lsws !I-,’ sandhi.

grammar Viz.  eluttu,  cdl.& porul. 
12)  The’ structures of  vwious types  of  sentences  vir 
simple,  complex,  compound,intrrrogative,  >mperat,ivE 
equational etc. 

l.(c) Major dialects:
Languages vs dialect.
Literary dialects vs spokm dialect.*.
Varioug kind of dialacto viz, social, regx#a? sic. r-.d
their mnJnr differences.
(2)
(1) History of Tamil Literature IJangam aaeracs cF Epics). The ‘Ethicel Litoratwe. The Eakthi Litarirtt:.-s (Nayanmars and Cllwars).

The Chala period, minor poetry and modern pericd.

(2)
Literary principles (1ndigsnor.15 and western). L-.tsrary conventions of CIkam and Puram. ‘Five Thinais and their signif icancor.

(3)The impacts of vaiaus, religious, socio and poli.tLca1 conditions on the devnlomerlt of various literary movements.
(4) Major literary genres (their origin and developmsnt)tyrics,Epics.various prabandams, shnrt story. noveis.Essay anc: "elk literature.
PFIPER I1
This paper wi1.l require firat-hand reading of the te:(t.~ prescribed and Nil: be designed to test the candidate’s rritica 1 abi 1 ity.
1, Thircival iuvar
2.
lllanavodigal

3.
Kamba

4. Cek.bilar
9. Bhm-athi
6.
Pharathidasam

7.
Thir1.i Vika
&!.bal1.i

7.M.Varadaraj3ri
TELlJOU
PhPER I
(1)(a) Origin & develoment of the Tel~gii language.
(ij The place of Telugii among the lanquage famila35 0-f lndia in general and the Dravidian fami-ty in particular-Geographical positions and distribution -Etymological Histor:, through inscriptions and literary soiurcps (from the ti?qir,:rzl4g
~f  the names Telcqu, Tenuga and Andhra. 
(ii) Major changes in Sound and grammatiizal  systems  from 
prqto-Dravidian  to old Telugu. 
(iii) History  of  Teluau thrbugh the  eges  as  ev~.de~ci.;: 

to the erd of the 15th centc!ry).
(iv)
Historv of the duveloment of Telugu from th.2 16sh century to the mncdprn period.

(v)
Mndern Period: EtmLl:.tinn of Tell.!gu t.hrovgh li.n.>~.,~::t;.~ and lFterar:/ movements !like the 5.p movemen%+.etc .

(b! Signi+icmt feetiirec of the gramrmr of the lanc~.#.?ce:

(1)
Malor divisir of Teiugu sentences (Sirnpl-?.com~Iqs:: a.i:d compo@-!nd: Declarative. impsrative etc. !Equat.ior~ala’,:, nap-equational sentences.

(ii1 Word order in Telugu-Relative Order of ~ar~rl.,~ grammatic~.l categories-change of normal word order anf ,:C.?C~-modes nf f ncusG2,ng.
(iii! Use of varLnL!s participles in T~lugc!(F’erfecti’,,e Durative etc! .Nom.inalFz~.tinnsand Relativization. Reported specch!Pirect and Indirect). l’lr;-pholoq: of PJactr~s ?.nd Verb: Plctr ?:isat:.o? C..’FE on: Format.ion of fi.?ite snd non–fipi.te ,ic.rb=. F’hnnology: Phonemes and their ‘5;rtribut;on a.n? pronunciation I Sandhi processes –
(c) Major Dialects of Telugu/Varieties of. language:
Regional and social variations in Telugu-De–c?l Phonological and Grammatical characteristics of each var>.c?ty.
PAPER I1
This  paper  Wi!  1 reuire  first-hand  reading  nf  the  te:ct3 
prescribed  end  wil.1  be  de5i’Jned t.:I;  test,  the  candi.jater-
crL tIcd1 abi:itv . 
1. Nannaya  Andhrs Mahabharatarnu 

Adip-ara~darniu Pr-athmasvar,tni..!( 1 Bonk-1 –Cant,z!
2. Tikkana At idhra Mahabharatarnu
Lr.3taparv arn4.i -13 LViti;/ 3s-
V.is.arnu( 11!Eoc~!:. -11 eanto!


AIi d11r-3 Mah3,bhag avatam:-( pratP5,m.3
5.1.anthsmu-(1 Bc?@l:) ‘Jer-sec,i-l.1_0.
.-ata.ntF’o. .:,
URDU
PAPER I
(a) The corning of the Aryans in India-the development ff the Indo-Wvan through three stages-old Indc? Ctryan ((IIA). Middle Inda-Flryav (MIA) and New Inda-Rryen !NlA!-Grouping af the New Indo-Ctryarb languages-Wrsteren Hlndl and it.; dlalecte
-Khari Boli, Braj Bhasha and Har:rani-Relationshi.p of Urdu to khadi-Perso-Rrabic elements in Urdu Development of Urdu from 1200 to 1800 in the North and 1400 t0 1700 in the Deczan.
(b)
Signif isant features of Urdu Phomlogy-Morphology Syntax-Perso-Rrabi.: elements in its phonology, morphology and Syntax-its vocabulary.

(c)
Dal..harhi Urdu-its origin and development-its siqnificavt Linqu1stic fea.tL!res;

(d)
The clgnif icant features of the DaGhanl Urdu literat~tre ~L45!:1-170D1.-The two clas-aical ba.c1:gror!nd= of Grdu Literature-”errc-Arablc and Indian -Mywiavi Indian ta.l:?s-the influence i2f the Wect on Urdu q+.zners-

literattire-~~.la~~~.~.ral. Shaza! ,Mast ici%n-Rasida, Rcibai-0i.t.a. Prose, Ficrtior., Yoder-geners Ralank Verse. Frcie Vet-z-e, Novel Short 5torie:. ‘Ii-z.in3.-Lit.erary critism and E=s?a?.
PWER I1
This gaper wrll rsquire fir-st-hsnd reading af the te.:ts prescribed and 441.11 be desiGned to test the candidatz’s ability.
PROSE 1 Mir Amman, Psgh-O-H-?.har
I     r
2.
Ghalsb     F:hatl:t-e-Gh;i 1it?,

(Anj wn3n larr-.3qrd.e-e-urdu 1

3.    
Hali Muqaddama-e-Sher -0-Shairi

4.Ruswa Umra-O.-Jan CIda 5.Prem Chand Wa.rdat.
6.Abdul Kalam Azad Ghu bar-e- Y:hat1rI
7.Imtiaz Ali Tar Anar Kali.
POETRY
B.Mir     Intikhab-a-Ka 1am-e-.-Wir !Ed.Abdul Haq’j.
9.Sauda     Ciasaid (including Ha.jwiyat
10.Ghal ib     Diwan-e-Ghalib
11. Iqbal     Hal-r-Gibrail
12..Josh
Ma1ihab+di Saif-c-Sabu 1J.Firaq Gorakhpuri Huhe-e–Kainat. 14.Faiz Ka.1am-e-Fai 2 (CompIcte)
MANAQEMENT
PAPER I
The candidate shculd make a stud:/ of the development of the field nf manai,;,znent as a systematic body of knowledge and acquaint himcel f ;dequat.ely with the cnntribi-itions nf ? eadiq; authorities on ths subject. He should sti.;dy the role,functron and behaviour of e manager and relevance, nf various concept: and theories tcj tho Indian cOntei:t.Apart from these? r;ener-al. cohcepts, the csndidates should study the environment of business, and also attempt to understand the tools and techniques of decision making.
The  candidate  would  be given choice to  answer  anv  five 
questinns. 
Organ3 satlnnal Pehaviour h Management Concep ts 
Significance  of  social  psycholoqical  factors  for 

unrJerstand?.ng organisational behaviour:Fielevan~e of theories 0f mQtV .l.A tien :Cnntributi~QCIMas1ow lierz berCJ I McGregor
0f
McClelland ;ind other leading authorities, qrsearch studies ir, leadership. Management by ObJectives.Sma.11 gro1i.p and intergr?up behaviour.Appilcation of these ccncepts for cinderstani::.. n82 the manageri.$l rele.conflict and
~
conperation. work. norms and dynamics of organisatienal behav iourICl rganL5dti.ana1 ch.5.nge . Organis-at. :.on3 I Dec~.gn:Clas~.ic+1 nso-c Lsssicral and open
,terns thei?rir.5 of tion,
~5.3i1artrCr.(m11:saianE;ro
1: ien, del~gat~on aut.hop-itv aLd control.
Organisational 3t.rci.ctrure.syrtem~ arid processes, str-a.+.rgies! pOliCiCS ?i->rlobJectives, Decislon maCiri3, zommvnic3t;un and contrul . *lsna~ement information system and role q+ c,x~putet-in managenir!nt. Ec~mm,icEnvironment
Nat.~.anal Income, anslysii and its use in birsinesi foreca.stiP*..T:-ends and strucl:ure in 1ndi;n Ecanam) , Goverenmenr. programmes and polocies. Regulctcry pol icler: mone-tary. f.L%calsnd planning, and the impart c+ sc!ch nacro-
policies
01:
enterprise decision and plans-Demand analysis and
forecagting ,cost anslysis,pricing decision under differrnt mark.et etructur~s-pricing of joint products and priceI discrimin3.tion-capita1 budge ti139-app1ication5 I!nder Indian
conditions. Choice of prajects and cost benefit analysis,
choice of producticn ‘technique$.
Duantitative Mettmdg
Classical @ptiini.zstion: ma:rima and mtnima. of single and
several. variables: ,2ptimization c:nder constra.ints-
AppI. ications . ii. nBBr Programminy :Prob1em fc!rmci1atinn–
Gr3phical Salutim-Simple;: Method Dual it:.-post optir~s1ity
analysis-Qpplicat icns of integar Pro#gra.nrmlng and d:,;namic
programming -Fnt-iit~llation of Transportation and asrr_gnment
Models of linear programminq an4 methods nf coluti~~n.
‘jtatistical Metl-o9c: Meaxr-rr of C?ntr,?l tendencieE and variations-Applic~tion of Binomial. Fc,isrr~nn end v.inrrna1 fi5tribut1rjns . Tim ? 5sri,=s-Reg rc-lL:5ic3n ?r,,j C c rIez.t1nn Te6t% of Hypothesees-Decision maki.ng itnder rizb. : :~?z.I.F1nr! Trees-E::p*C ted Monc tar I’ Jj 1c!.e-(Ja1i.1.e i?f 1ii fr,rmet_ ion-app 1 i$13 ti,ln Payes Theorem to go.st_erlnr anq31ys;is.Dacision maCin3 under uncertain?). Different critErion for selec-tlnq optimnm strategies.
PFIPER I1
The candidate w~~,vld reqLlired five cuestrons
he to attempt but not mare than two qiier,tion.; from any one section
Section I-Marketin? Management
Marketing and Econanir Development-Marketing Concept and its applicability to +.he Indian economy-Major tasl.s of managemerlt in the context Of development economy-Rural and Urban marketing, their prospects and problems.
f’ ,:,
Flanning :tnd Strategy in the context of domestic and export
mark.eting-concept of mark.eting miit -Mar.ket Segmentatioo and
Product dJ fferentiatton strategies-Consumer Motivatibn and
Hehavinur-r~nnsi.?mer Eehavioural Models-Product ,Brand,
distribut is-m :
pa-tblFr: d2rt.r~butinn rycjtems, price end promot.ion.
Eecision-F lanning and control of marketing programmes-
M3rketing -esearch and Vnde 1+-% les Organisationa1 dynamics-
Marketing !rl for-matior; System. Marketing a.1-idit an4 control .
Expnrt inc9nt.ive.s and promotional strateaies-Role of
EovE? rnmer. t ., trade as513c1r’tinn and ir.divid1.1 .aI $2rgan1sation–prohlemE ;r,d pt-ospscts of export marke.ting. Section IT–Frcdc!ctix and Materials Management
Ir-cif F’rodvct;.on. from Scaraaement point of kirw. T:/pes ".f ?ls.nc\f~.cturing svstams: cont~cli_i.nu—repet:tr.ve. intercnittFr3t. Organising fpr Productinn, Lor*g range, forecast and aggre,:jst_c? F’rzdvctinn F1 anning. P1arit Pec-13n :F’ro.-ess pl~nning. plast sizp and scale of Operatlbh3. Iocatrnn of plant. la.;a~.<t physica.1 facilitikc-. Equipment replacement
of and maintevance.
F.mctinnC: of F’rnduction Planr>’ing and C:mtrcI Souting. Lnad.ing .?i..td Schedcil. ing for different types cf productinn systems. a,Lcembl:/ Line Balancing.Machine Line Ba.lanci,ng.
Pole and lmportmce of materials management. Materia? hsnrjling, Value analyFii5, Quality cnntro!. Waste ant? Scrap disposal. Make or Pcry decision,Codification, Standardisation and spare $a.rts inv.entary. Inventary ccntrnl-AEC analysis,
Economic order quaqtity,  Recorder point,  Safety stock.  Two 
Bin  systems,  Waste  menagement,DES tD purchase process  and 
procedure. 
Section  111-Financial  Management 

General tools t~f Financial 6nalysls:Rstia analysis, funds flow analysis, cnst-volume-profit analysis, cash budgeting. finantial and operating leverage.
Investment Decision: Steps. in Capital expenditurc management, cri-teria for investment apprail-a1j, ccst of capital and its application in public and private sectors, Risk analysis in investment decisions. organisa.tiona1 evaluation of capital expenditure management with special reference to India. Financing decision: Estimating the firms of financiai requirements, f tnancisl structure determinations, iapitnl market5, instit.’-\?ional mechanism far funds with Special reference tn Irld;-a. securit:/ analysis I leasing and sub-contracting. Work.ing Capital Managements: Detnrmin;rtinn the size of working capital.. mana.ging the managerial attitilde towards risk in working capital, management of cash, inventor:. and dcco~nts receivables, ef iects of inflation on worbins .srpital management. Income Determj.:iation and Distribution: Interna1 finencinq, determination of dividend palicy , implica.tion of inf 1atiena.r;) Sndencies in dethrmining the dividend policy I valuation and dividend policy. Financial managerrent in Public Sector with special reference
to rndia. 
Performance  budgeting  and  principles  of  financial 
accountin?.  Systems of management  control. 
Section-IV  Human Resource rlanagement 
Characterrstics  and  significance  of  Human  Pescurcee, 

Fersonal c,:~13cies-Manpnwer, Pal icy and Planning-Recru 1 tinent and Selection Technique-Training and Developmen t-Promotions and T-ansfers; Performance Appraisal-Job Evaluation: Ws.9~ and ss.Iat-;/ AerniniEtratinn: Employee Moral-, and Motr\ation: Conf lirt M,:nagement.: !lanaaement of Ch3nge and Developmpnt.
Industria: Relationsl Eccmomy agd Societ:,.zci Ir,dia; Worker profile or,d Wansgement ‘?t::l.es in India: Tt-sdP !_lnion!.sm in India: 1abm4r Legislltion with specis! referencr tq Ind!istrial Disputes F.ct: Fayment of Fjonf.ts Act; Trade Clnionr Act: Industria: demncrac:, and WorLrrs’ participati.on in Hanagement ‘ Col lecti.~~?Ra.rgaining: Conci; ieticc and adj ud icitj.cn : di.;cipline end Grievances Handling in Ind!.i-,tr:. .
MATHEMhTICS

FhPER-I

Any live question may he attempted out of 12 questions to be set in the paper. Linear Algebra
Vector space. bases, dimension of a finitely generated
space, linear transformations, Rank and nulity of a linear
transformation. Ca:/ley Hamil ton theoram. Eigenvalues and
Eigen vectors.
Matrix ot linear transformation. Row and i3olumn
reduction. Erhc inn form, Equivalence, Congruence and
similarity. Redl2c :ion to canonical forms.
nrthoaonal . symmetric.al sk.ew-syametiical unita.r;z. Hermmitian and sf;ew-hermi tian matrices-thei r eigenva 1 ue5. orthogonal and I.Ln itary redclrtion of quardratic md Hermitar: forms. fositi,dc* definite q~:adratI.c formc. Simu 1 t3ner)uF reduction. Calculus
Real numbe;..s, limits, continuitv. differentiabrl3,ty. Mean-value theorrm, Ts;!lorh theorem, indeterminate forms. Yaxima and Minima I Curve Tracing &/rnptotes Functions of several uariablr5? part;a: derivatives, maxima and minima. Jacobian. Defi-1 :e and indefinite int..qrals. Doubk nnrf triple integral.? f xchniques only 1. dpptrr~tionto Beta arc? Ea.mma Functions. ,4reaiI Vol.umes, Centre of gravity. Analytic Geometry of two an,l three dimensions,
First and s.?cond degree equations in two dimenainnr ir5 Cartesian and pcia -coor,?Jinates. Planes, phere, parahlnic: Ellipsoide, hypsr’mlnid of one and two sheets and their elementary prove -ties. Curves in space curvature anr’ torsion. Franet’s formulae. Diffrential Eq~mtions
Order and Degree of a diffrential equation,
dif’ferential  equation  of  first  order  and  first  degree, 
variables  seperable.  Homogeneous,  1ines.r  and  exact 
differential  equation.  Differential  equations rith  constant 

coeffcients. The complementary function and the prticular
a:.: m 3;’
integral of e", Cosa". Sin + :: . e Cos b::? e 3:i Sin bx.
Vector,  Tensor.  Statics, Dynamics and Hydrostatic2 
(i)  Ve ctors  Analysis  – Vector  filgebraI 
Differentiation  of  Vector function of  a  scalar  variable. 

Sradient, divergence and curl in Cartesian. c:/lindi-iial and spherical cnordinates and thelr physi-ca1 interpr-etation. Highei-order drriva.t%ves. Vector identi.t.ies .?nd L’ector equations. Geuss and Stokes Theorems.
(ill Tensor Analysie-Ds-finittin of .a T?n=or.
Tran5format ion of (:cm rdinates.
ant ?. arcon; .:?nccntr.:q vharLant
tensors. Gdrlition .And mi.:ti.p: 1rz.at.Lan of t.en.;nrT, contr.?.cti~~ of tenssor:: Inner product, fLind?mFr!tal tensor. schrLrtcf fel
I
rynrboI5, * c(3nvarirint d r.fferer?tFat1on GradiCR t Cc;r1 and
~
divergencs i’7 tcnaor notat,lon.
*’
(ii;? Statrcs cf ‘?:.stem of particlesl
-Etq~!ilibrl~n a work. and pntantial enzr’gy. Fritction, Common catena.r:i. F’rincipal .7f Eirtctal work.. Stabilit;! cf eqciilibrium. Eqiiilihriuili r!? forces .in three dimensions.
(iv! Dynamics-&?Tree of freedom and constrain-ts. Rectilinear motion. Simple h.qrmomlc mot-ior. rl,rtioi: 1v a plane. Projectiles. Con;trained motion. Work and energy. Motion under implusivc? forcer;. li’epler’c, lawa. Orbits L1.ndE.r central fnrres. Motion of varying mass. Notion cinder resistance.
(V)  Hydrystatics- PressLire  of  heavy  fluida. 
Equilibrium of  f;uLds  under 3iven system of  forces.  Centre 
of  pressure.  rhrust  on  tuned surfaces.  Equilibrium  of 

floating bodiss. Stability crf equilibrium and pressitre of gasses, problem-, rPlating to atmosphere.
PAPER I1

The paper will be in two sectionr. Each section will contain eight qi.ie?stion. Candidatew wil 1 ha.vo to answer any five question. Sectian A
Rlgebra, Rsal Analysis. rom@:e:.: Analysis. Fartial Differential equations. Section H
Mechanics. FYdrod?narniCE . Numerica1 C4na 1I c J.5 St~tisticsinclu-liiq prbbahil it.;/: operational Renearc$. A1geb:a
Groups. si.ib3roups. ncrmal subgrovps homomorphism a+ graups, qilotient jroups. Paslc isomarphism thearems. 5.)tow theorems. F‘erm!lt3tion Gr@ups. rayler’s theorem. Rinrjs and Ideals, Principai ideal domains, mi.que factorizatiun domi.inc and Euclidean domains. Field Extensions. Flnite fields. Real Analysis
Metric spaces. their topolo3y with special reference to Rn sequence in a mztric space’, Cauchy sequence, Completeness, Completion Conti 1ctocts functions Uniform Continuity,
Prgpertiec of continLous functions on Compact set:. Rlemann Stieltjes Integral. Improper intergrals and thier conditions of existmce. Differentiation of function of several variables. Implicit function theorem. ma::ima and minima, Absolute and Conditional Covergence of aeries of real and Complex terms, Rearrangement of series. Uniform convergence, infinite prodc!cts. Continuit y dFferentiabi11t:: and
integrabi1.itv for series, Multiple i’ntegr.als.
Complex An? lysis
FIna1.,’tis functions Cauchy ‘5 theoreme. Cauchy ‘5 integval farmctla, power aeries. T3.l lor’s serles. Singula.rlt?es Cuachr’s Re5idLie theorem .3rld Ci.ntrnLlr inteyratioti. P3rtial Di’ferential Eqi-iation
Formatian of partlal differenrla? eauations, T>;per of integraIs of partial differential eqtua-tzans cif firs? order, Charpits methods. Par%ial differentiai ec:.’aflon with constant ciief f irrmt.j. Mechanics
Genrr-nlised Coordinate%I Constraints. hGlonom:.c and
non-holononrc  systems.  !I’Alemberts’  prirm~c~pl.erand 
Langrangec  equations,  mmment of  Inertia,  Mc.tion of  rigid 
bodies in  t.wn dimension. 
tiy drod y n a.m ics 

Equation of continuity momentum and energy. Inviscid Flow Theory;-Two dimansional. matian, st.reaminq motion, Sources and Sinks.
Numeric31 And1y.5i9
Transcedental and Polynomial Equations:-Methods of tabulation, bisection, regula-falsi, secants and Newton-Rephson and order of its convergence.
In terpo l.atinn and Numerica1 dif f eren tia tion :-Polynomial interpolation with equal or uneual step size.. Spline intepolat ion-Cubic splines. Numeric,?.l dif ferentiatiorl. formula with err’3r terms.
Numerica1 Integration:-Prob?ems of appro:: imate q1.1ad’rative ? qIadr3ti.1 re f ormi.1ae with eqCIispaced arqLI ment’l-Crursian quadara tnre Convergcnce.
Od in ar:r I:iffrentia1 Equation5 :-Eu 1 er’ 5 method multisteppredic+ot.e Corrector methndr—adam’s and I’!ilne’s methods and stabi’.ity. Punqe -Kutta methods. Frobability and Stgt.istics
1. Statiatica.1 ..,Methods: Concept of stati.stica1 papulation and t-.cdnrn sample.. Collection and presentation cf data. Measure-scf lncation .md disp~rsim Woments
,, and Shepard’s rirrertionc. Comul.mts. meC~surscaf Skennes’l- -and kurtosis.
Curve f ittirg by least’ aquarec Reqre~sion,, correlation and correla-tiov ?;tin, Rank correlatiav I Fartial carrelatinn co-ef f icient and P.ultiple correlation co-efficient.
2 Probability:-Oiscrets sample space, Events. thei-union and interzection etc. Probability -Classisical relative f requwcy and exiomatic approaches. Proba.bi1ity in con’tinuum, Frobatility space Conditional probability and independence, 8351s laws of Probability. Probablity o.f
combinatir>r> of events. Baye’5 theorem. Random vc.ria.ble Frobab1it;i function, F’rQbabl1 ity densit.:! fupction. Distributions fimctiorl; Mathematical expectaticn. M;.rginal and conditi ondl distribution Conditional eirpectation.
T. Frobabilitv di.strj.bi!tion:- Rinom.al, -Foision. Norma.!. Gamma. Bet t.3, fauch.;~,W-tl tinc.mia1. Hyperg%~metric. negative Pinomi+.\ Chebychev’s lemma. (ksk) 1.aw of Sh2.c-qe ni:rnberz, Centra.! I imit theorem for independent and identical varietirs.. Standard errors. Samplinq distribution ~f t, F and Chi-siiirar? and their-uses in ?-..rr.t~.lf ci?nif?.c3nce, ia.rqe s.amp!e-, tests f.ar mean and proportior,. nperatinna1 Research
flath~:rmati.rsl Programming:-Gof inition nn-3 same elementar-prapoerties of convex sets;. simple!; methods. degenar3cy ., dvality I and sensitivitv snal:tslc-. rectangular 43am~s and their snlutions. TranSDortation an,d ac_rignment problerns. Kuhn Tucker conditinn for non-linear progra~nning. Fellman’s optimality principle >r?d s*ame elennetary applicatiorm of dynamic programming.
Theory Gf c7ueues:-AnaIysir of steady-state and transient snlutions for qaueqeing system with Bsssian a.rriv.els end expential service time.
Deterministic replacement models. SeqL:encing problems with two mdchj.ne5, n jobs. 3 mschines, n JQ~S(Speci;ll case) and n machi.oes 2 jobs.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

PAPER I

StatiCB :-Equa1ibrium in threc dimen-, ions z.1-1.spension
cables. Principle of virtual work.
Dynamics: fielative motion coriollr; force Mntion of a.
rigid body. Eyr~copic motion impulse.
Theory cf Machan.ics:-higher and lower pairs. inversion, stee:-ing machani.sm5. HooL:.s .icint. veloci tc an1d acceleration of link-,, intertis forces, rams C,n ji..i.qz..te a*.:tlcic of gearing and irtarfearence. gear trains. epic.Ic1i.c gears. Clutches be1t drives. br?k.es d’;/namcmeter-sI F1:I wheel?
~
Bavernora, Balaniirig of rr?t.at.ing and reciprocating massea an:j multicylinder r7~;ineS. Free? furced a.nd ,damped vi’t?ration.z for a single deg-se of freedom. Degre-e of freedom. Critical. speed and whirling of shafts.
Machanics of +olid~j:–.Stress tsnd cLrain in twr dimmsions. Monr’s circle. Theories of failure, Detlscti~i~ Of beams. Puck1ing of colaumns. C:omhined brndino 39.3 br5im Casti3lmo’s theorem, Thi-t cylinders Fotatinq disks. Shrink. fit. Thermal Stresses"
Ma.nufactilrii-.g Science; .-Merchants ‘ theory Ta.y 1nr.z equation. MacF8ireahility. Uncanvertional ~machninq method– including EDM. ECM and ultras.sn.ic ma&iiiing. Use of laser?: and pla5mas. Pnalrsis of forminq procecGjny. High velocity forming. Explosive forming. Surface rovqhnesja. aacrgin3 comparators. Jig.. and Fixtures.
Prodtt.ction Management:-Work. Simplification work sa.mpling, value engineering. Line balancing. work. station design. s+.oraqe space requit-ement, AEC anel::sir. Economic order, quiantity incli!ding finite production rate. Graphical and simlc… m%t.hods for linear prTgramminp: tranrpot-tation model . el vr,entar:, qi_r!.er;ing theory. Clua1il.v control a.nd it,: LIS~S In prr?duct design. Ilse of XI R,P !Sigma) snd charts. ‘2in g 1e 9amp 1inq p1ans. opera.tin3 7haracte ri5.t_ ic 5 CLI.rves
~
Averaqe san*ple size. Regression anal~/.sir-.
PAPER I1
Thermodynamics:-Application nf the f irct and second laws nf thermodvnamics. Detailed anal‘isis of thernod;/na.mlc C\/cles.
Flnirj Mechanics:-Contlnility momentum and ene!-gy equatrcns. ‘Jeloci t:. distribution in laminar avd tut-Sul,er:t flow. Pimensicma1 an1;rsis. Boundary la~/er on a flat plate. iA diabatic: snd isrntroohic flow. Mach number.
Heat Transfer:-Critical. thinlicness of irlE.iulirtinn Conduction in the presence of heat Ijoiurces a.nd cinl.:. ?eat transfer trom finc. One dimeslonal t..inst%?dy conduction. Time con.5tant for thermocoirples. Momenturn and energ:’ equations tor boundar?: lay~rson a. flat plate. Dsmens:.onless number Frae and Forced convection. Ecil inq aicf cm&ensation. Nature of r-adiant heat. Stefan-Holt.zm?n law. ICnnfigL~ratlon factor loqrithmic mean temperature difference. Ikat exchanger rffectiveness and number of transfer units.
Energy Conversion:-Combustion phenomennn in C. I. and-
S.I. engines Carburation and fuel injection. Selection of
pumps Classification of hydraulic turbines, specific speed. Performance of c2mpressar. fAnalysrc of stem and gac turbines. Hig’i .presser boilers. Vnconventional power systems. Incl:.!ding Nuclea,–power and MHD systems. Uti!isation of e.-!:at-energy.
Environmenta! Control :-Vapour comorescion .absorption, steam jet and <,i. -refriqeratiun systems. F’romerti9s anc characteristics .?f impot- tan t ref riqer?,nts. IJse of p5vchrometric ch:!r,; ;~.nd.comfort chart. E~timatianof soling and ,heating 1or74′.. Calculatiora of si~ppl; air state and r?L,e-Air-cond itionrnq p .a1ta 1AY~)!.!.L,.
PHILOSOPHY
PAPER I
Metaphysics and Epwtemology
Candidates ui1.l be expected to be familliar with theories and tyoer-of Eoistemology and MataFhysics-Iiidl-n and Western-with speciitl reference to the following 1
!a,? Westerr-Ideslism: Realism; Absoiutism; Ersp;p-i cism Rationalism: Lo~ii.al Fositi.vism: Ans-lysis: F’henemenology? Existentialism and Pragm?.tism.
(b) Indian-F ramanans and Framanys: Theories of truth and error; PhL!o<phy of Language and Meaning: Theories of reality with refercnce to niain system (Orthodox and Hetrodox) of Phi losaphy .
PAFER I1
Socic-Political Philosophy and PhlLosophy of Religion. l’.Nat.ure of Fhilnsophy: its relation to lifs, thought and cul turi..
2. The followinq topics with special reference to the Indian coptext inclctdinq Indian Cmstiti!.tien:- Po1I.+ica1 .Ideologies : Democracy Soria1ism. Fsscism, Theocr.ac:l CJmmunism .and Sarvodaya.
Metkds of Fnlitical Action: ~ur,stiti:tior.alism, Revolution ? Termrim and Satyagrah.
3. ;radition. change and Modernitv with reference to Indian Social Insititutions.
11. F’hi1cscph.i of Religious language and Ma3iring.
5. Nt!-tre and scooe of Fhilosljli:, of reliu?.on. Philosnphv of Reliqion with special roference to Ritdhir,m. Ja.insm, Hinduism.. Islam. Christianity and Sik.hism.
!a) ‘healoqy and Philosophy of F.’el.igion. ib! Foundation of religious belief: Peanon RevEIation F-aith and Mysticism.
(c) God. 1mmorta.l.itv of Soc:l I Liberation and Froblem of Evil and Sin. (d! Equality; Un.i+y and Universality of Fieligions:
He1igious tolrrancc: Conversion Secularism. 6,.Wck.sh-Paths leading to Molzsha
PHYSIC8

PFIPER I

MECHANICS, THERIAL PHYSICS AND WAVES AND OSCILLATIONS

1. Mechanics:
Conservation Laws. Collisions. impsct parameter, ncattering crosz-szction centre of mass and lab systemc with transformation nf 2hyrical quanitiea, ‘utherford Scattering. Motion of a t-o:k.?t under coristant force tield. Katatinq frames of refernncs. Coriolis force. !lotion nt riqjd bod.tes. Cingular momentc!m Torqc!e and processiar, o.f a. top. Gyroscope Centrd f@r-reS7 Intion cinder inver’se s-qvare law. C:epler’.: Lars, Mation I:,? Satsllites (including geostd.tiona.r.!I, Galilean Relati ti, Special. Theory of F’e!atj.vitv. Mirhe!son-MnrIEy Experiemeri t, Lorent-Transformations addition theorem
of  ve!ocities.  ‘i?ria.tion of  mass with Volocit:/.  Mass-Enerqy 
equivalence.  Fl.!id  dynamics,  stre*.mlnes.  tiirnbi.fIance; 
Bernoulli’s  Equa::im  with simple applicetions. 
2. Thermal Fhysica: 

Laws af +.hzt-modynamics, Enti-opy, Carnot’s cvcl.z.. Isotherma1 and <Adibatic Changes, Thermodynamic Pctentia.1s
~
Ma.:rwel 1’s relatians. The Clausit.ie-ClaPP;/ron equation :. reversible cell, Jouble-Kelvin effects. Stefan-Poltzmann Law. Kinetic TheJry of Gases, Maxwell’s Distribution Law 0 Velocities, Equipartition of enrgy. Specific hests 3f ga5cs mean Free path. Brownian Motion. Black Body red ation specific heat cjf s3lid-Einstein P? debye thoeries, Wein s law
Planck’s LAW, Solar Constant. The Thermalionization and Stellar spectra. Production of low temperature using adiabatic demagnatization and dilution refreigeration, Concept of negative temperature.
3. Waver and Oscillations: Oscillations, Simple harmonic motion, stationary and travelling wavee I Damped harmonic motion. Forced oscillation & Resonanch. Wava eqiiation, Harmonic Solutions, Plane and Spherical Waves. Superposition at waves. Phase and Group velocit.ie3, Beate. Huygen’s
principle, Interferencs. Diffrrctinn-Fressnel and Fraunholfer. Diffraction by straight eligs, simple and multiple slits. Resolving power of grating and Cstical. Instrument:i. Ray1eph Criterion,Po1arizatim: Ft-duct’r an and el-lipticali. Laser sources (Helium-Neon, Ruby and semi condvctor diode). Concept of spatial and temproa: coh.rrence.. ciffractinrr a5 a Foprier Transformation, Creme1 and craur?hbfer diffaction by rectanpular and circular ape;-tures, holography, thecry and applications.
ELECTRICITY & MQGNETISM, MODERN PHYSICS CIND ELECTRONICS
1.     Electricity I Magnetimmlr Coulomb’s Law. Electric qield, Gauss’s law,, El.?ctric-potential. Poission and Laplace equations
for a homogeneous dielectric , uncharged Conducting sphere in a uniform field,Point charpe and infinite conducting plane. Magnetic shell.Magnetic induction and field
stren g th.Fi0-sav:ar t 1aw and app1ication5. E1ectromaCJ netic: .induction,Farad? ”s and Lerize’c-law5,S;rlf and MutuaL. inductances. R1te:-n Iti’ng currents-L -C.R . circuits series and psrallel resanarin:e circuits, qualit., factor. Kirchoff’s law-: wj.th app 1icatic)i 1.r-. Ma:i;ye1 1’5 ecluetrions and e1ertrcImcgIIfti : wave5, transver,;e nature ot e:ectromagret.ic waves. pcyntino vectors. Magnelic field in marter-dia,Faralferro. sntr-term and ferri magne1r;zn (qual;tit;7\ie appraach only ) .
2. MODERN PHYSICS :
Pnhr’s theory of h/irogen atnm. Electronspin. Dpt.ica1 and X –
rays spectra. 5tern-Ger:ach experiment a.cd kpatia’.
quant.ization. ‘.:.?cto model of the at.om, spei-tral tErms, fine
structure af st>ect.ral 1,iner. J.J. c?, I..:? coupl.lng.Zeems.n
effect,Fauli.s-e :elusion principle. =pct.r-3! termr oi 1′
equivalent 2nd nm-equivalent elect*-on-,. Gross and tine
structure of .?l?ctron3.c hand spertra. Raman"r-~Ifect.
Photnclectrir ef ‘ert.Cnmuton effect.Ds-krog7. ic !.M+L.@S. lJav.e:

partic1e dua1it;* P 7d uncer-taif~ty prin1: ip1e. 5chrod iF,r_! Pr wavA equation with a!rrplication to ii). Pa~-tlcle in a. ho::. [ii) motion across 3 s.tep potential . one dimensianal bsrmr.nic oscillator eiqw valrce and eigen functions. I..Jncertelnt;,. principle and radi~act.ivity?alpha,betaand g3mma radiatlons. Elementary theor:! 9f the alpha decay. Nvclear binding energy. Mass spectdoscopy, semi-empirical msss formula. W~cciear fission and fwion. Elementary reactor physics. Elementar:. particles and their classifications. Strong and .weel:. electromagnetic interactions. Particle acceleratars :
cyclotrons. Linear acceleratos . elementerv ideas of
supercondu-tiv1ty .
3. ELECTRONICS :
Band theor!! af solids -Conductors. insulatorc- and semi conductors I Ivtrincics acd c:.:trinc,i.c srmironjuctot-I F-P.1 .Junction. Thermisters, Zener diode .reverce and forward bias F-N Junctions. Salar cell. Clsa of diodes and tra.?si-,tcrs for rect.iticat.nn? anplification, oscil lation, mnodulaticrl and detectian ..!f rf waves. Transistors and recei’aers. Television. Logic aates.
POLITICAL SCIENCE AND INTEKNATIOAL RELATIONS
PRFER I
SECTION A
POLITICAL THEORY:

1. Main TPaturc of ancient Indian political tt-~or.!.?ht;Mcnic and k.’ac!til!/a ; 1111cient Greek. thought ;P 13to Pristatle: General characteriztics af European Medieval pnlitical thought:St. Thomas Pqciinaz.. Marsiqlia of Fadct.3. : F?acha,,elli: Hobbes.Locb:e, Montesquleu. Fentham.
Fi’ni.~r,~.~ai~~. J .S.Mi11. T.L.Green, Hegel. Mar,:, !-snip and tlao-T=?-Tci.ng.
2. Nature and scope of pol.itim1 5ci.ence:
Growth of political science a.5 a discipline. Traditional Verses Contemparary approchas: Behaviouralism and Post-BehJ.VlOUra1 developments: System theory end other recent
approchas to politica.1 anal:ysic,. Ma.rxists approa.rh to political analyFir.
3.
The emer-;]erlce and nature af the modern :tateS: Sovereignty; Ilcmiz.itc plural istic analysis of zovereignt;/: power authority and 1,egitimacy.

4.
F’gl itical ot! 1:.gat ions: ESE.istance .w4dFevn1LItion : 6 ig hts Liberty, Equ31it.f , Justice.

9. Theor;! of Dc.mccracy
6. Liberalicrn.Evolutianat-~,, Socializ!m I ‘Jernoctrat: c en$+ Febian ) : Marxian-Socialism Fascism.
SECTION R
GOVERNMENT AND FC.LITICS WITH SPECIGL REFERENCE ‘TO INDIA

1.
Approachec trr the zt.udy of the comparative po~i+~c5:
Tradiiona1 Str’.!.ctLira 1-f unctiona 1 appr.rrach .

2.
FLolitical In: titi..rtion; the Legislature , E::ecL!t:’vc. and .Judiciary: F’artir-sz a.nd Pressure group-,: Theories of P?.r+:. sy5tem : Lenl.17 Michels a.nd Duverger;E!ectoral system :

I
Pureauct-acies-Wetier ‘5 view.; 2nd modern critrques of Weber.
.Z. Political Frlce-ss Folitica: Socializetion. moderniiation :+,ncl communication; the nature of nnn-westerr’ political procer.5. P general stl-idy of the conztitutinnal and poli-%i.cal problem:; affecting Afro-Asian Societies.
4. Indian Folit:cal System (a]-The Roots; Colonialism and nationalism in Inriia; A genersl study of mndern Indian 5ocial and political thought; Raja Rammohan Roy, Dadabhai Nauroji, Goirhale, Tilali, Sir Aurobindo, Iqhal, Jinnah. Gandhi, B.R.Ambedkar, M.N .Roy and Nc-hru.
I b) The structure : Indian Constitution, Fundamental Rights and Uirec’: ive Friciples: Union Government; Par1is.ment, Cabinet. 5upreme Court and Judical He…/iew; Indian Federalism Centre-5t.s.t.e relations: 5tzt.e Government rnle nf Gob erner: Fanchyat R,j
9. The Fdnctioning:-Class snd caste ~n InrJi!+i., F’ol.itics. Politirs Q* regionalism. linquism and communalism. Prnblem.: of seci.~larl;ra,t.innnf the poIic;/ and nations1 i?tegpration. Po11t7. c3 1 -? 1. ites : the c9anging compus iC1on: Pa1iCic.31p3.rti03
and     >,c?it’ral participation: Flanni.ng and 3~velopmsntal ijn Socio-economic chanaea ani! .its imps.ct on Indian nisl.mccrac./.
PRPER I1 PART I
1. The mature and functioning nf the Sn.i?reignstion state
s~item.
-7
L. Concrpts of Intevat.iona1 Pnliticc-; Foner:Nat.x=mal
‘tnterest: B~.l.+ncsof Power. "Power V.cu!.i.~n". Sa Theorit?c: on International Fr_ll.itics: The Realist Theory: c,/stems thmr:.!: Decision making.
\
4.
Det.Ermi.nantz of foreign policy National Interest; Ideology :Element.% of National Fouler i: inclading nature o.f domestic socio-politic institution 1.

5.
Foriegn Policy Choices:-1mperialism:Ralance of Power: Allegiances: Isolationalism: Natinnalistic Universalism -( Pa:.: Pritia.nnica. Pa:: Americana. Pa:r-SovieticaJ : The " Middle

Kingdom" Complex of China; Non-a1 ignment.
6.
The Cold lJar : 0rigin.evoI.ution and its impect on international relatiansi: Defence and its impact: a. new cold war?

7.
Non-alignment : Meaning Eases ( Nations1 and International the non-aligned Movement and its role in international relations,.

A. De-colonizxtion and expansion of the internationai
community; Neo-colonialism and racialism. their imp2c.t on international rp!s.tion: Arian African resurgence.
9. The present. Iitcrnational economic order: Aid,trade and economic deve1o:xnsnt:the strvggle for I:t-,e new International Economic Drder :3\, over natural cri.5~:;
?reign?.:/ resources: the
re1at:Lons: The Lnt ?rna.tronal Coctrt of .JI:B~~c_c.
11.. 0rigi.n and Development nf Internationai. Organization,=:Th? I..Jni.ted natiijns and Specialized Aqeniins-their role in inkr-national relatians.
12. Pegional ot-qmizatl.on: OAS, OPli, the .Qr-ah Leayi.!e. the ASEPN. the EEC , +:.?sirrsle in int.mnationa1 relat..icns.
17. Prms race d~~armaner~t arm cmitrol
and : Conventiona.1 an2 nuclear arms, thc ?rmrlTrede f its impact on third world rule in international rzlations.
14.
Diplomatic th3ory and Wcatice.

15.
External iitervention! ideological, Political and

~
economic, " Cu1t-1 ra1 imperia1ism" , Covert intervention by major powers.
1.
The 4-tse5 and mis-uses of nuclear energy; the impact of nuclear wF3Pons on international relationc; the Partial Test ban Treat,;. the Nuclear Non-ProLiferatron Treat:.? fPIFT! : Feaceful r:.tclesr e::plnsiain (WE!.

2.
The pr:!hIelns and prospects o+ the Indiar, Clce!en being made a peace ~c-e.

3.
The c,ziflict sit.tratir?n in West 6kis.

4. Confl I.::? and co-nprr+tion in Sixtt+. asis.
5.
The ~oet’ur~ir!for’eiqr, pntic7.e.: of thp meior pnwrsr-,: United Sta’f-;. Soviet !Jn;or?. Chins.

6.
The Ibh.1t-d world i.n international reletions: the ;Worth-South "Di.3: olrge" in the !)nitnd iJat.iuna -?nil Oui-=ine.

7.
Indi.7 E forign polir.; and r-r?iati.c!nc: Ln.dis, s.nd wper powerr: Irdia and it? neiahbw:: J!idra and th? 5ac-t

:;.~i.i.t!-:
kea: Indi: and 4fr can orob?c?m; Indrm’s ecmzmic dipl-?rnacy; India .md a PO? qccec,t on of r.i.i.clear W+?,IXCE.
PSYCHOLOGY

PAPER I
FOUNDfiTIONS OF PSYCHOLOGY

1. The 5Cr.p~of P,zychr?lc.gy
Place of Psychology in the family of soci.al and behavioural sciences.
2. Method:. of Fsychology Wethodolo~jical problems of psychology. General design of psychological re-earch.Type5 of psychological research . The characteristicr; of psycho log ica1 measurement.
3.
The nature origin and development of human behaviour. Heredity and environment. Cultural factors and behaviour. The process of socialisation. Concepts of National Character.

4.
Coqnitive Processes .

Perception I Theories of perception. Perceptual organisation. Person perception. Ferceptc!al defence. TransactionPl aoproach to perception. Perceotion and pers@n31ity . Fi$4CLra1 af t€1r-ef fect. Percept[.I 3.1 5 f’/1e6. Perceptual abnorma1ities. Vigi1ence.
5. Leraning.
Cognitive, Opc?r’ant and Classical conditioning approaches. \.earning phenomena. Extinctian. Discrimination and generalisatinn. Discr.imination learning. Probahiiit>/ learning. Frogrammed learning.
6. Remembering.
Theories of rpvmernbering. Short-term memory. Lonq-term memory. Measurement of memory. Fcrgetting. Reminiscence.
7. Thinking.
Problem solving. Concept fomation. Strategies of csncept formation. Infcrmation processing. Creative thinkirrg. Convergent and Divergent thinking. Development of think.ing in children, theories.
8. Intelligence.
Nature of int.elligence. Theories of intal ligonce. Measurement of intel ligcnce. Veasuremevt of creailLvity.
nptitude. Measurement of aptitude. The conrepr of sccial inte11 iger.ce.
9. Motive cion.
Character. ietics of motivatsd brhviour. Ppprclacnrc ta motivatior.. Psycho-analytic theory; Orive Theory: Need h%eirarchy theory. Veckor valence approach. Concept of level Of aspiration. Measurement of motivatidn. The apathetic and the alienated individual. Incentive.
10. Personality.
The conrept of personality. trait and type approaches. Factorial ’ and dimensional approaches. Theories of personalit.-!: Freud, Allport, Murray, Cattell. Social learning theory and Field Theory. The Indian approach to personality -the conr..ipt of Gunae. Yeasur,rmsrlt of personality: Ruesticnaz.-es: Ret’ing Scales: Povchometric Testa: Prgrectjve Tests;Obcervatinn methods.
11 Lanqu age and Communication.
Peycholor; ical basis of language. Therj-: of language dcvelcpmer?t. Skinner and Chornsky. Non-verbal communication. Pcdy langroaqe. Effective communicatior.: Source and receiver characteri.itit~. Persuasive communications.
12. attitudes and Values.
Structur= nf attitudes. Formation cbf attitudes. Theories of attitudes. CIttitude measurement. Types @fattit.itde scales. Theopies of attitde change. Values. Types of values. Motivational properties of values. Measuremerrt of Values
13. Recent trends.
Fsycho.logy and +tie Computer. Cybervetic model of beha\.ioar. Simulation ct~1dii.s in psychology. Stud:: of consclovsness. Altered states r;f consciousfiesr: Sleep, dream. med.tatim and h!,fDnntiC trence: c’rLig induced chanaes. Sensnry deprivation. Hi.!ma.n prnblems lo aviation and space flights.
14. Mc.dEls of M-7.!. The Mechanical Plan. The Organic Msm. The OrgzniE.ationa1 Mari. The H~,rr.~nistiz Impl.ic?t~.ons the
blan.     of
different *ode15 :’c-,r behavixir changes.
6%

1ntegt-a:ed nadrl
PAPER I1
FSYCHOLOGYs ISSUES AND QPFLICATIONS
I
tests. Pconztrvctr:.on of FFYchslogica1 test.5 Th?ra .zterl. stic5
I
of a good p".y c bf-?I. y tect L.1 mi ta t.ion6 of p’ ,,,chj21cigicB1
tests.

2. F’".>’C~C~CIC~C~I
!.)> F.~#T$P~S. Cl?jssitic?tlcn csf disorder e!id nosoloalce.1 s:,stemf. Nevr-c*t.ic. p6Y chot1c and p5y choCIh\/5ioIngic di59rderG . Ps rhnpB t_ h1c personality. Theot-des r_lf psychological disorder. Trie prriblemc nf a.nxiety, deorescion snc’ srecs.
S. Thersprutic ‘?[?,pr@azhes.
Fsychodynamic approach. Behaviour therapy. Cllentcentred thera.py. Cognitivrr thei-a.py. Group therapy
I
4. Applicati.on of Fs:,cholop:: to Organisatrona: and
Industrial     problems. Fersonal selection. Training. Work mofivation. Theories of
work mot >.vation. Job designing. Leadership training.
Participatory management,
5. Small r-irovps.
The concept af smal groups. Properties of groups. Groups at work. Thecry of group behaviour. Measurement cf group behaviour. Interaction process analysis. Int.erbersona1 relations.
5.. Social Change.
Character..stics of socinl .change. Fsy,chological basis of chsnge. Steps in the change process. F;esi.ntance to cha ge-Fact.ors cw\:ri.buting to resistance. Planning for change. The concept of changeproneness.
7. Ps’i.chc: cg:: and Learning process.
The Learfier. School as an agent of soci2,lisation. Frob em: relating +o adolescents in learning situations. Gifted and retarded chi laern and prob!ems re1ated tn thejr training.
€3. PisedvIntagecl Groups.
Types: :-ctcial. CLI~t.iira1I and economic. Psvchological ConsrquenCrAs of disadvantage. Concept of Deprivation. Educating the disadvantaged grocrpr. Froblems of mcti./atinc: the disad\.wta,ged gt-otipc
~
9. Psyct~!~!.agyand the prohlem of Focial Integration, Tha problem cf ethnic preji.idLce. Nature of pre.iiid.~ce. Manifesta.t:.ons of prejudice. Development of prejudice. Measuremevt Gf prejudice. Amelioration clf prejudice.
Prejudice a.nd personality. Steps to achieve Socia! integration.
10. Psychology and Economic Development.
The nature sf achievement motivetion. Motivetin3 peoale for achievement. Promotion of entrepreneurship. 1-he Evtrepreneur Syndr@me. Technolagical change snd its impact on human behvarour.
11. Manaqeinent of In+oorrreti,on and Communication. Psychcloqical factor-, in in.form;ltinn management. Information overload. ~c,~~~chr~l,ogica1 iif effective communication.
besir
Mass media ?nd +-heir rnle? in soci?l chPnge. Tnipact of Televicion. G+yi’-ni~gic.21 basis of effective advertisina.
12. F’robLem-of Contemportiy Soriet:/.
5frez.c. Management of Stwsz. Rlcoho?ism and Drvg Adclitinn. The ‘%cia: 1, Dedient. JLivenila DEi.Llla?lenr’;. ?rime Rehabilitation of the deviant. The pri’hlens of the egei’:*
PUBLIC ADflINISTR4TION
FFIPER I
ADMINISTRfiTIVE THEORY
I. E:a.sic F’remieei:. ,,–Meanincj. scope and signif ica,nCe tzL ockblic administ.r*t.ion: Frivate and public sdministrat.1.or : its roie in develnped and rievelopinq societies: Ecnlogy of admi.nistration -social! economic, caltural pclitical and 1ega.l. Evolcctinrr of Pllblic administ,ration as a discrpline: pcihlic Administ-ation a5 an art Pnd a science: New PLiblic Administration.
11. Theories of Oganisation-Scientific msnagement (Taylor
and his associates). The Bureaucratic theory of organisstion (Weber),Cli:-,ssical theory of Organisation (Henry Fayol ,Luther Gulic and others): The Human Relations Theory of Organistion (Elton Mayo and hi5 colleagues) : Behavioural Approach,Systems Approach: Organisaational Effectiveness.
I I I F’t-inciEs! 5 of 9r53anisation-Hierarchy unity of camma.nd., Fl!.lthority 2nd Responsibility. C.oordinstien. Span of
Corttrol 3Svpervizion  Centra.llsation  arid  decentra.lisationI 
delegation. 
10  AdminJ str-at.ive  Behaviour-Decisitm  making  with  special 

F’cfe-ence !.o $be contri.hution of Herbert Simon. Theories of ILeader-ship :Conmunication:Mora1F;:Motivati,on iMa.3 1OW and !ierzt?erg).
‘J Stri.ii.t.ure of Orqanisations~ -Chief Executive: Types of
,:hief E::r:itives arid their fi.tnctlons: I >.ne staff and au:;il lary d3P7ClPS> departments, Corporstinns. Companies rna.b-c?s and commissions, Hea.dquarter= and field
~
re:ati.onsh’p.
FcrEcr;ne1 Qdmi n 1Btrat.1@n-Ru reaiicrwc:,’ and Civ i1 ServiCP~: P-is?.tion C!.a.?sif i ci.tior, ; Recriiitment: Tre :.n ing : Career devc.lnpment, pertormanee appraisal Fromotion; Fa:, and Service Conditims: Retirement Benefit=: discipline,
~
Emp1oyer-E!np 1@:lee re1ations. intear.I. ty in 4dmi n i5trationI Generalis.ts r.nd Specialists Neutrality and Anonymity.
VI 1. Fir,ancial Pdministration -Ccncept Of Bctdget? Preoaratior and Executiui of the Budget: Ferformance
Budgeting; Legislative Control: Plcrounts and Audit. VIIJ. Accountability and Control -The concepts of Accountabi1it:i and Control; Legislative, Executive md Judicial Contr-431 over Administration, Citizen and Administration.
IX.
Administarstive Reforms -0 3 M: WcrC Stiudy: Work Measurement: Administrative Reforms: Prccer-ses and Dbstacle.;.

X.
Administ.r.ati.Je Law -Importance nf Administrltivo Law: Delegated LeqinL.3.tion: Mea.ning, Typez. iidvan+.a.(1.e,=, LimitationB . Saf equard.; .Adminic.trat1.ve Tr1tuna13,

XI. Cnmpa.rative and DeveLopment ACmini=trntion -Me:,riing , Natw-e and Scope of Comparative Ftubtlc Administratiov. Cuntribl.!t.ion of !:red Riyg5 with oa,rtFci.!,?ar re’ference tm the Fr1mat.j.r Sslc mcdel I The Concept. Scope and sign ~.f:.cnncc of
~
Development. Wm,.nLztrati,Jv Political Economic ,.and 3cc:o-Cul%L!ral Conte:.it r)f Oe,Jelopmei-t AdmicictratioP. The Cilncept of Qdministrative Develnpment.
XII. Fuhlic Fo~-cy-Relevance jof F’olic:. 14ok:inc: ~n ~ublrc Administration. The pracecses of Fclicy Formulation and Implementation.
FQPER I1
INDIAN ADMINISTRATION
I. Evolut?.on nf Indian Administration:-b:autilya; Muqhal period: British period.
11. Environmental Setting :-Constitution. Parliamentary Democracy, Federalism, Planning, Socialism.
111. Political E:cecutive at the L!nion level :-Fresjzdent. Frime Minister. Council of liiini.st?rs. Cabinet
Committees.

IV. FT’triicture of central Admifilstratlon :-Secretar at. Cabinet Eecretarizt. *Iiiiisterles and Department. Boards and Commissioir, Field Drqanisatlnnc.
V.. ~-.erti-e-9%atsRelations-Le3i51?ti,qe. Admin~st.cative, Flanning 3nd Financisl.
VI Fl.jblic Services-91: India Pervices. Central ServrcsS, Stite Services. Local Civs 1 Services. Ur.ion anil S.tate FLI~!j,.c. Serv~ceCommisslnn. Tt-.?.nlng nf Civil Service’s.
‘411 Marhiner;t for Flc7nninq-Plan Formulation ~t the National I. 5 National Deve1ozrnent C.mncr1: Planning Commissicri; !?lann.-vq Machin~r-~.,at the Statv and D1;trict 1eveI. .
‘1117 F:.?b!ic l!!nd6rtai:~vgs-Fqrnc man-.gement control and problems.
IX Cantrol-of Public E!:pEnditi:re-Far1i;.mentar; Control. Role ~f the Finance Mir,i-;tery., Comptrtol!er and Auditor Geveral.
X Adninictration of Law and Order- Rol~zf Cef,tral and State Qgencies i.n Maintainre of Lew and Drcer .
XI Stste Adminirtration-Governor-: Chiei Minister, Cnuncil a~f Minister;: Secretariat, Chiof Secretary, Directorates.
XI1 Distric and Local Administration-Role and importance; District Collector. Land and revenue. law and order and leielopmental functions. District FAi.ra1 Development. Agevr?. Special nevelopment Programmes.
XI T I Loca..l Administration-Fanchsyati K’aj : Urban Loca.1 Government., Features, Forms, Problems Autonomy af Local bodies.
XI’;. Administration far LJelfare- Admi.nistration for the Welfare nf Wesl,er %ztfoh-; with Farticular Reference ts Scheditled C+stcc. Srhedvled Tribes. and F:-‘@~~~:,WTPSf?r thf; lrlE1.f .>,vpc’ f IJqmen
.5t+-ztj.xi-FE? 1e tionship betrrown Fol:1ical nnd Permanent E::~cittlves.. GeneraList5 -?nd
-r-
q-cie!:.st In Wministrat.inn. Inteat-ity 2n AdrnrnJ.st3ticn. F’enple’s P?.rti,:ipation in Adrrir,istration F:ecerz.-,el nt C;t.-r-n’~ c;rje.$~r,cpg, !L?b. F*??:* and Loi: A?c!ktesr Qdmin;strati –eRr–t3r-ms in India.
SOCIOLOGY

PQPER I
OENEHAL SOCIOLOGY
Scientific ~ti.id:,of social phenomena: The emergence rit sociology and its relationship with other disciplines: science and socicl behaviour. the problem of objectivity: the scientific methsd and design of z.ociologica.1 research; techniques of .dcat.a collection and measurement including participant sn.? non-partici pam t observation. interview schedules ..nd questionnaires. 2nd measurement of attitcides.
Fi.or,~:erisrig contribution to F-ocialacJy: The seminal ideas of Durkheim, Weher. Kedcliffe-Brown, Mailnow=ki, Farsons. Ilerton and Mar;< historica1 materia1ism a1ienat ion class and ‘class struggle Durk.hi!n-d.ivision of lataur, social fact. re.: 1.qir.n and society: Webe$-.-,:..cii.l 3ctiont f’,pe5 of a.i-ithoriCy. biireaii.::racy. rationa! itr. Frotest?.r,t e.tli~cand the spirit capitalism, ideal type?!.
rbf
industrialization and changes in the political I educat.iona1
religious, famil iarl. arid stratificationdl spheres: 5ocial determinants irnd consequences of economic development.
Political s:.stem: The nature of social power-commi..tcit,y power structure: power of the elite, class power. crganization pow?t-,. power of unorganized ma.sses; power authorit’. and legitimacy: power in democraci and in totalitarian s~,ci.+?y:politics! parties and voting.
EdL!cetionaI F:\Z~~F?~T,: Soc1s.l ot-igirrs and orlentat:.cn cf students and tee.chers, equslit:; of educatiorial opportr.tr,it.~, educatim PB 3 mediium of citl ti-i.ral reprodcction, indoctrination I eclcdal stratif ic-etlon. and mot.! 1it.:: education and modernisation.
Religion: ‘-he religioi!.s phensmenon: the sacred end the profa.ne;, sccrial +tinctions a.nd dysfl.lncticlns of I-eiiginn, magic rel.igion ar,d sc.’E-ncEI change-. in r;nciet.y 2nd crhangpz in re1isioi~sEPCU 1B t-.., z;, tion.
Socirl chArlge and development: Social ?trii,rtctre and sacial change, 2:ontini.rity and change 3.5 fact and s.5 v.?I.I.~. processes cf change: theories of change. 5.oci.e1. disor3a.niza.tion and social movements, types of social movements: directed social change, social policy end social development
PAPER I1
SOCIETY OF INDI4

Histm-ical moorings of the Indian Society: Traditional hindci social organization: sociocultural dynamics through the ages, especially the impact If Puddhish. Islm and the modern West: fsc+.irs irr continui t:: and chanae.
Sncl il sta.tifica.’:.inn: Caste sy~tem and its transform: ‘.:on 3 ctc, r,+ritLu1. economic and caste tat^^, cultura. Ant structure v:.ers about c;.ste, mobilit:/ in caste? icsues of eqvality snd social justice caste among the HIndus end nor, Hi.:-~!!vc,: c,?steism: Baci.ward Cla.ss~sacd the SchedL!.led Castes: u-lto?~_habj.lit,,,and its eradication: sgrarisn and industrial c:l*zs atrisctoi-e.
Fami 1 <,. marriage end Kiridst,;.p: feaicinel variat.ioi ~n Kinship 5 stenim and ti.i.r-zl correlates cr!enqing
rts sctcio–c~t,i
aspect^^ CI: kinihip: the joint .fa.m structur?l and functional nspezlz z.nd itc ct-targl.ng fqrm pnd disot-Qanization: marriage emmrmg cll fferevt r:.>thiic orcups aid ec.onomic c*tegof-:eE its rhaninp frreiid and its fntvre: iaioact of lepislatior, snd ~ocio-econctmlc ch3rige upon famil:; and marriage: ir!tergeTteration% ga.p ?.nd ,:outh Unrest; changing status of womerf.
Econc?nl>.c r-:,’stern: The Jaimarx turn and its bear-ing on the traditinnal societ;,: market economy ~nd~tsSocial consequencis: ocrupati.qna1 diversif i.cation and socia1 stri.rcture professi.oii trade unlons: social determinants and
conseguences of sconomic development: economic inogua!iteis,
exploration and corruption.
Political system: The functioning of the democratic
political system in a traditional society; political parties .and their soci;.l cgmposition: political oartier and thier socipl compossicn sccial structitrzl origns of pcliticrl elit&. and thier social. oreintatians. decentralization of
power and pqliticsl ?nrtic.ipation.
Educaticr. system: Educstisq and cocic-tu in the
traditiona1 ahd the modcrm t. tiwF I inewis1It).
cmte:.: ed~i.c..a
and c+,ange: cducstion anb social mmilit:.. educetions!
problem5 of wonw-t, the Backward Clrlescs and the Scheduled
Cac-tes.
Re1 ig J :in : Dezmogvaohic dimer,%ione. oeoqraphica: dietr!.bvtion en<; neiobboccticod living Dettcrns Of rr.?.lot-re1igi CUB cater8i.r 1~5. j r.’er 1 IQ2 CC’J i*>t.c-r.hct :on a;>d it~. manira,station ir. the prch:oaz s,f c~,r,’.’e-c?.an. mir,c.ritv stat.!c and communalism. secularism.
Tribal soc:eties ?.nd their LntcqretionF.: Distinctivc
feature of trib3.l sommmitieo t.r:.b.?s snd caste. ac=ultilt-rtion
and in teqra tion.
Rural soci.-.l eystom and conlmvnL t: dcbelopmert: Sgcio-
culturd1 dimenerons sf the villrge community: tra.d.i.tiona!
power structure, democratizatior-,sod leadership: poverty.
indebtedness and bjnded labour, socia!. sonseciiencec of lrno
reforms, Communrty Oevelopment Fropramme encl other planned development projec+s and of Green Recclution: New str?.tegies to rrtra.1 development.
Urbm social organitatitin; Continuity and Ch8nge in traditional &ses of soci.al organizstion, namely, tp~ships, caste and r.eligions in the ur6ati context; stratification and m@bility in urban communities, ethinic diversity and comm.unity ? n tedra tion ;. cirban neighbourhoods; ruralur ban difference: in damograbhic and sociocultural characteristics And their mcisl consecwences.
Pop.-*liction d\;namics: ~orio-cuiturs~ end
aspects ot sex aqe str.tct ‘re. ma?’ital status. ferti !ity J.nd mortality; the
problem  Q- ocpuletion  e::~lc%icm:  sacj.al+ psychological, 
c~tltural :md  economic  factors iv the  rdoption  of  family 
p) anning p,.ectices. 

Soci-.: change and modcrnrzatiZNl$ Problems of nOle Conf lict-., .ii.i:h unrest-intergeratlnnal gap changing Stat1u.s 01 Women: q&er Sources of socisl change and of Resistance to change, ir.part @f West. reform movemf?nts. social movements. industrial zaticsn and urbanization. pressure grwps txtors of planner: change-Five year Plsnc lepislative and e!:ecutive meansur@s: procese of change-sanskrj tixation. westernizetim ;nd moderr izstion: mEans of modernizstron-mass ‘ media and educJtioo: problem of. change and modernization Strt*CtLWal contradict; on and break.downs.
Curri-nt Social Evj 1 Corruption and Nepotism-Smuggling- Black. none;.
STATISTICS

PWER I
Attempt an:’ 5 questions choosing at most 2 from each section. Four auzstionr of equal weightaga will be s?t in each section.
1. Probobi1ity
Sample space and events, probability messure and probability spac:, Statistical independevce? Random vari..?.ble as a msasusreahls functian. Discrete and continous rxtdnm vacia.b1es+ Prob3 bi1ity density and d1ctr FoutLon f .inftIon.5. marginal and ccnditionml dist.ribvtLons function or random variables and th-rir distributions, e::pectatijn and movements. condi t.iov.al expectat.ion, correlatiop coetfcisnt. convergence .in probability i-LP almor-t everywhere: Markav. Chob./rne\#and KolmoQrow inequa!itiar, €m-el-Cantelli lemma. ‘weak ‘a?d strona law or larg;? niimbhrc ,orob$dbilit%r genereti?q and :haracteristic functions. hiq?teness and c->ntinvity theoremee. Determination of. distrikttion b:! momevts. iinderberg-Levy i:en+.ral limit theorem. Standard dierrste and continuous prob2bilit;r distributions, their inter-el ?.tion5 including limiti.-.g cases. 2. Statistical 1,nference
Properties of estimate.;. consistency. unbiasedness. efficiency, sufficiency and completenes. Cramer-Rao bond. Minimum varianc-unbiared estimation. Rae-Block.wel1 and Lehmann ..Sheffe’s theorem methods of estimation by moments maximum liklihood, minium Chi-square. Prop~ertiesof ma;:imum
1; .:I.kb1.lIr+.31.J
1ik.lihood estim+tors confidence intervals for Darameters of standards distributions. Simple and cornposicte hy~othese~. tests and
statistical critisil r-?~ion, two I-irdo, of error. pgwer filnctian unbiased tests. mmi. powerful and uni.fcrmly most. powerful tests Nevman Psrron I-emca.. optimal test.s fir simple hypotheses concerning one p.irae?ter monctcne !ik.!ihood ratio property and’ its use
1.n constr.:ctiny IJMP test. Lib.lihood rrttio criterion s.nd its
ssymptoti1: distribr.ttior, Chj-square and I. olmogorrl\ testB fer
~
p:mdneEs nf fit. 9i.m test for randomness ‘3iGa test for L.ocation. Wi Icc:,or.-mnnn-Whic_ney test and k olmcqor-5.nirnov test for t:~?two smspler. orot.lem. Distribution tree covfidencc ;nt.z*v,?lz for’ ou3ni ties and confidence bancn for
:un c4.1. cc4.
Notec-ran .?+ B ssquentral. teat. Wlds SPRT, its CC and
ASN functI,317.
:. ‘1inear i nfarcnce and MI.! 1ti..,ariete ha laysis

..
Then-:’ of. least sguarss snd Gca?lsis zf :~i.imcs.
.:I
Oauss-mark*-.+t theorc, norma: . equat.iocic. 11a:ej 6c?*-iare estimates enr: their 3recisiC)c Testa of s~.p-tif~.:wcn and intervals Pstimates ‘based 00 l?ast c,o!.!a’rp theorv in cne wa… t.wo w3-1 an.: three way cleseificd dati. Fegression 4valr313, lx-ear rc..,t-sssion es.tim+tesrr!d test about correlatxon ani
~
regression cueff icimt curve 1znear regression and orthogonal polynomials. te%tfor linearity ef repression. Multivariate normal distribution, multiple reqression,multiple and partial correlation. Mahanobilo D2 and Hotelling TZ-Statistics and their aoplicationo (derivations of distribution of D2 and TZ
excluded1 Fisher’s discriminant analy.sis.
PAPER I1
(i)Select any sections.
(ii)Attempt art:/ 4 questions from the selected sections. choosing at most., twc qL!estions from esch ielected saction. Four questions of equal weight will be cet i.n each section.
1. Sa.mpling Theory and Oesign of Experiments.
Nature and rcocr of s3mpling. simple random sampI.in3. sampling from fir-ite popnlatron with md withortt replacement, estimation @f the standard error? zampl,?..no with equal pababilities and PFS rampling. Stratrfied i-andn$n snc systematic samp! in? twn stage and multistsqs samplinq!. mu1tiphase and c.?uster ssmplin3 schemes.
Estimation of population total amd mean, use af Siasec and tmbiased est.rma.tes A.u::ilici..r? var-iables. doi.tble samnlinp standzrd errus af estimates f~!.ncti~ns
cost and variance ratic and regresion estimates and theii re1a,tive eff ii:ienc.J. Planning and s?-rganization of %ample5 sctrve\/ with zceci?l reference to recent 1S:rqe scale sci.rve;’s condii.cted in India.
Frinciples of wxperimental designs. LRU. HHL), LSD. missing plot technique factorial e::perimeits 2 n and 3 ri design general theory of total and partial ronfsctnrlinj ane fractions1 reoliration Analysis of split plot. BIB arid zimple lattice designs.
1I.Engineering !%tatistics Concepts of quality and meaning of control. Different types
of Control chirr-ts like X -P charts. P charts n3 chart-, * and comulative sum control charts. Sampling jnspection vs 100 per cent inspection. Single double muLtiple ar,d seqi*.eptial samplinc) plan-, for rtribcites inspectron-OC, ASN ano PTI curves. Ccncept of orodrrcor’s risk and const!me-‘s risk fiR. C1CIOL.LTPD eti. Varisble Sampling. p:.rns. Definition of Reliabil.i:;, msivtsin+bil it;. md . ~va?-lsbilit./ life diSt-ibk!tiun fsiI*.?r’e rate a-1~4b&ih–tirb. +ail:.rrc rate cl-trvs e:(p:’"erientisI and 4eibifJ 1 mcdeis Reii+cbilitv of swies md -Para .. 1 a1 systems apd other :;imp16 =onf rgurari.?ns. Different types of re’dvnda-ic~, lice hot cqd c::d and w~e of rcdctndaric:. &r( reliahx 1it.v rmcrobe~nar,t oros1mn.x in !~fe
testing .-r.-ric;orod snd trr.nc+ted E:,oerimcnts f.>r.e-ponmtial
solel.

111. Opcrd*i?nal Reseirc:: Sccpe and’ definition OT OR different t\:cos .ii their constrlJcei 1.n rnd ootaining eolv.tion. Homogenws descrote time Mar&:.oy chains. transiticn probabil ilry matrix. rlassifrcation af ets.tes ana et-qo.iir theorems .:omcqenot.ls continuous time IlarCuv chains. Elehents of qt~.citic:?theor.;). M/M’1 anti M’il?:k (aueiies, the protlrm of machine in+et-feren,ze and GI./Pl!I nn.3 NlGI qucurc-. Concept o+’ SC1entlf;c inventory management and analytical Structure of inventory problems. Si.mple models wifh deterministic and stcchastLc demand with and without leadtime. Storage models with particular reference to dam
type.
The structure an@ formation of a linear programming problem.
.:is simplex procedure two ‘phase methqds and charnes -charnes

-Kmethod with Lrtificial variables. The qualilty theof.! of
Linear progrsaniming end its economic interpretation.
Sensitivity ana1,;eis.
Transportation a-il Assignment probls-ms.
Replacement of items that fail and thoria that deteriariatc.
grow and individual replaceldent polilcies.

Intraduction to computers and eiemlcnts of Fortrm 1′) Pt-ogramminq Formats for input and output statcments. specification and logical 5tatement.s and subroutines. Application to same simple sta.tistica.1 problems. IV Ouantitative Economics
Concept of Lime-series. additxve and mu1 tiplicative models. rsso1ut:on into four comoonents. determination Of trend by free-hand drawing, m0vir.g averages and fittina of mathematical ctrv~5, seasonal indices and estim’ate of the variance of the random components.
Definition, construction, interpretation and limitations of index numbers. Lespeyre Paroche Edgewoth -Marshall and Fisher index nirmbers their rompar isont tests for inde:.: numbers and construction of cost a+ 1 ivi.ng index.
Theocy and ana.!;Jsis of consumer deman.d -specification rncl estimation of demand functions. Demand elnsticiti&s. Theory of production, supply functions and elasticities, input demand functions. Estimation of parameters in single equation model -classical least squares, generalieed least
squares hatcroscedasticity seriel correlation, 5imu.l taneous equation models -identification. rank. and order conditions. Indirect least squares and two stage least squares, dhort tern econmic +orecact:n3.
V. Demograph;* and Psychometry
Sources of demographic dat3 census registratibn! NCS and other decwgraohic scrveys. Limitation and use5 of drlmoqrephi ‘. data.
vital rZkFS nod ratiCs: Eofinition +nnstruct:on and ~i~ee.
Lifo tshles -Comp:ete and absi.ctged: conmtr~~ictioqof life tables fr.?.m vita: statistics anc! ceqc,cis reC.lms Cfses. cf life tables.
Logiatir: and @+herpopvl ation arowth cur-/ec.
Meaf@vreof fert 1!i:tr-. Eross and net regrncvction rates.
Stable zcgc*l+ti~n thecry. ‘Jr-sn of stablr -and aupsi-
Stable ponuldtion teehniaues in eat:.matian of demogranhic paramenter=. Mcirbr&C.. ant( its measurem~rtt: Stsrilard rl ass:ficatisn b:; cause ~f death. Health surve:!s and of ho=p?.tal
1.m?
statisticr.

Educatiwal ana psychologicel st;,tisticz. metnod5 of standardis3tion of sca!eo and tests. IQ tcstz. ra:iabilit.: of tests and T and Z scores.
ZOOLOGY
PAPER I
Non-chordata Si3d C5ordata Ecology.EcolO9y.Biostatistics and Economics Zoolog…
SECTION A
No6 Chordsta. 3rd Chordsta

1.
Q GonerGl c~trvayclacs?.+icaticn arid reletionship of tlw vprious ?h::,la.

2.
Frotczc.6: St!rd!. nf the strvcture. bj.onomica end 1iPP h1stor:! of F’r *. Imadi’i urn. ?lon@c:to+?. i. maiari3.1 parasite. Trypanos,-ims +r.d :…-ishmania.

txomo+.i~t.. r.:’:ritiun and reprcdclction in Fr~t.=:Es..

3.
Poi-! fers: Ca-aal t..?.r;tem, she1ej-m w:d rc.xodi.tction.

4.
COrientci-:.t. :.: St-r~ictitre and !.ift hist@ry of Obelra Aurolia. calyrn?~r~hizm in uydrozoa. coral ?ormc.tion. metzpenesis. cb.:jlogerietic relationship of Cinidxia

Sfn?doria.

5.
I-klaiqthz: :.tr,..rtcire and ‘life hictorv of Planaria, Faszic:!a. 1a.en;a t Ascaris. Parasitic adaptatron, Helminths in relation rc r.:!n.

6.
Annelide: Plercic. earttworm and leech: coslom F: met?.inorism: modes of life in polychactss.

7.
Arthropoda: Palasmon. Scofpion. cockroach, larval forms and parasitis? in CrL!stacea, \mouth part vision and respiration in arthropods, sociel life and metamorphosis in insects. Importance of Peripstus.

6. Nollusea: L!njio and Pila.oyster culture and pearl
formation, cephalopods.
9.
Echinc,dermata -General organisation, larval forms and
affinities of Echinidermata.

10. General organisation-and cheracsters, outline
classif icatiun and inter-relationship of pruto-chorda.ta,
Fisces, Amrihibia, Peptilia, Ave5 and..mammalia.
11., Neotwy and retrogressive metamgrphnsis.

12. A qenerel study if comparati’vr ec.xount of the various
c11y 6tern of ..*?1-tr-brates.
1.7" Lo!-omntion, migration arid respiration in fishes:
slrr–Li.cture +ii;j affinitles of Drpnoi.

14. Orioin of Amphibia: distribution anatomrcal
peculiarities and affinities nf ilrodele and Armda.

7 c.f Reptiles: 3dapt.ive radiztion ~n r-epti?es: fossil .rep–iles;pi?is@nousand non poisonous sr1ai.r.s of india.: poison’ appf.,ri.?ti-tso+ snake,
14. Orjgir: r?f h~t-ds:f 12;ihtless hirdz.: serla! acl-?ptsti.?r, end m>.aratron r.cf b>.rds..
17. Oriyc!, oi mammals: nornologies of ear ossicles in ma.mmals; ‘dentition s.n.3 skin deravstives ir. marnlma1.s. di5tributiv-i. 5 trur;tvra1 pecu1iarit1e5 and Dhy1ogenetic relations of Prntot,beria and Metatherla.
SECTION B
Ecology, Etholog:~, Bicstatistics and Economic Zoology Ecology –
1. Environment: Ahlotic factors and their role! Bl@tiC factors -Inter and intra-specific relations.
2. Anims.1: Org?nisation at pnpul~tim and community levels. ccologai ca1 succe: tions.
5. Ecosystem: Concept compments. fundamental oaerbtion,

energ’; flow. k:ogeochemical cyclesI food chain and trophic
levels.*
4. CldGppation in fresh wster. marine and terrestrial hpbi t+ts.
3. Follut~onin +ir. water an0 land.
3.     Wi.1d :!fe if’!r.d?a a-3 its conre*-L6tinn. EthOj3p –
7.
(ionera1 r-urv=.y nf various ~:IPYF c-f animal behsviovr.

8.
Role of harixwes and pheromot-ec, .in he5>.*ioi.*r.

Q. rh-m=.tb:c’In."v: ?iolepiczl t’lo~b.sn?ao-,al rh:.*hns. ?idol rhythms.
10. Wot8f-n -crnd*.crine control of behsviour. ..’.. f-letho35 qf stri@.:?nq pnina! behP\.10*.**-.
Stenbard deviance. cot-re snd t-f-est. Economic Zoolog;: –
13.
Farasitism. c.3mmens6

14.
Parasitic v&o:oans. helmiothis sod ~nsectcof man rnc domestic ariimelc.

15.
Insect pests of crc.ps and stored products. fb. Beneficial insects.

17. Piscizielture and induced breeding.
PWER I1 Cell Binlo?/. Genet3 cs?. Evolution Q Systematics. Bio-chemistry! Ph?.siology snd fmbryolcgy
cc.lovra*.ron mix ‘ :r.!: ix-lrtirq rnec’..irtismr. ?.nd thc-ir role.
Inc..*lrr fsvn?. c *r.r.?>t 3′ EcPc’es Sn*I e:ub-specjer. principles of c1ass:ficrtAcr.. zoological nomenclature rr.d ir ternrtional code. Fossils? outline 2f 3eologicrl eras phyloQenv of hm-lje?. elephr?. cPms!. origin and evolutioQ of man. principles rr.6 .tlreories of continental distribution a’ animals. zoopeq*-?chiC:a.l realms of the world.
cnpductim *io,ic A: br. end across s:*napas. r.ewotrznr-mctters. vision. hearinri and other receptws; t:/pe~ of muscles. ~:lt*-?s:rc*ctc~rez and mechanism ol’ rcntration of ?.kel tal mvncle;ro!e of i +ilkst.> ?:and, liver. or’ncreas and intestinal glsrlds in digestion. absorption of digested food. ncit.ritxon’
man.
LIPPENDIX-I1 !NFI)RW4′. I .?t! l’c, !:’APd31DATEt FrEt:AT;C! NS I!P.TE*?TI\’E TYPF Q~JESTICIPJJS w 1-m c: ]\)!I. FEF.V~CF~-rw-:E~:i-trrww~E.<A~(INAT!~N
A. Objective Test
:he Fre! imirlwv Examination wi! 1 be throueh ob.iectivo type of qvesti.ms. In this I.ind of e::Pmin+tion. the c?ndidate does not *rite detailed answer. For each qvcetion (hereinaftsr referred to as item!. severs.1 possible answers information sbou: the examination. 53 tbat they do not suffer dva to unfamiliz-nty with this type of examination.
(hereinaf trr  peterred  to  8s  rer.p,onsec)  are  aiven.  The 
candidzte has  to choose one resoonse 10  each item. 
This  Wanurl  1s intended  to  give  the  candidates  some 

B. Nature Of the TQSt
The question nzper wi;l be in the farm bf h TEST bOOFLET The boor let WI,; 1 contzin ~teinri bearing numbers 1.2.3.. … etc. Each item rrl the Booklet wi!? be bath in b’indi an?! English. Llntler eacb ,*.em will be ni./en r~.q~c=+od
re.;-&nr?*:-wrbed S.3.c.. …at.:. ?h+-.rndirldr.e w:) 1 5s reqt.tir$C’ t? cnr_as:*
-. the Correc?’. cr ‘.? *:c t.b?n:..athere are mere than One cc.r*ect too ht~tr+!iZ?r..? ‘~!*e"r;amtlv" ;te+ns at tne en?:, :n an. ca%o. in each .’.em he t.03 to ;e!+rt 3p.l~one reSt.3rse. I+
he.?
belects more th..*r me. bis answer will t:e cmeidarec wr0n.J.
C. Method of Answering
..
. (r Separare ;.!4GWEF\ SHEET (a snecjmgr, cop of which rii; he sent to gach c=.1*3id+tealon3with tho Amicsiar- Certificate! will be Or9v:cv-j tc. .he czr!dF%-.?.a in tI*r . 6..nmi~ctror. hk:l. I4e ba~tc marl I !.-Xngwv-:. OP ChC? -,+me .’avr+$ir :bee’.. whether
he answers :he ‘ trmk pr)r)td :> ‘l:n@i .?* .:+. fn:)l;lrh. ;,r.swar? mar’l.ed on thc Tset Poot.letr-..?r Ln an’; pnc.!rr 2thpr thzn Chc answer sheet wi’l not be e::amjned.
In the answer shetat. the r)iimSrrr ef the items frQm 1 tn Lb:i have beer, printed in for!r "parts". kgainrt each ?~PR, the responses a*h.c 3 are printed. after the ctndldpte h+s read an item in the Test Booklet’ and decided which of the qiren responses AS correct or is the best. he h+s to mark the circle. contair.inp the letter Of the selectecl treeponse b? blackening it neatly and completely with pencil to indicate the choice .of >is response. For examole. ifhe has chosen

particulars on tne answer sheet in the examinat:m hall. . HE? will. also be r:dnuired to enccrdp some particvlar~ cm Answer Sheet, 1ns.tr-k~r~~::i~ns !-hiswill be sent to Pim ?Long
about with his admj.sic*n Certificate.
5. Tho cami’.c"ate 1s reauired to read carefully all ins5ructions gi.,?r; ?.n t.he.Test BookTet. 1~s~
He may merL..s if
board on wnich -,>thing rhnv!d 5e writt.en. HF 1.5 nrt a!lnL.)ed to bring pn:’ =>cr-?.p!t-mi.g~~)paper. CIF-?.re.lee or dr;lwina
innstrvment into,. t!ie e:iarnir,eti.x: ha1 1 they are nnt rieeded. S~pai-ate ahee’i; for rntiah wnrr’ wi! i be pr.r)viijed OP ciemerd. He should write the name of ?.heexamina’cion, his Ho!! Number and the date i f the t.e-,t on it before do?r,g his rough woyl: and return it Lo the Svpervi-,or along wit.h his ancwer heft at the end of the ‘test.
E.     Special Instructions hfter the candldate has taken his seat :n the hall. the

sheets for rouoh wo-b     out r,f tCle a?:?ainsti?n hsll.
SMlPLE ITEMS (QUESTIONS)
(Note:-jDcnoter +.he correct/beSt ?nswer-option)
1. (General St~.tdle=)
Bleedirlg     of the ntxf? elid the ears is experienced at high c1 imber3 brczvse the blood IS !oss thcn the ateor.tharic
tc) planting in the correct se?soo
(d! plantirig with c ose swciog

4. (Chemic*ry b
The anhydride of H VO is.

(a) vo
(b)
V(3

(c)
v 3

L     (d) V 0
5. !EconomL cs1
l’lonopolistic e::plortation sf labour oIcurs wher,
8 (a) Wage is less then marpin~l revenue product
(b! both wa~eand marginal reventie prndrcct are eqml

(c)
wage ?.? mnze then the msrginrl ohr~sical reuenve pr@du&.

(d)
wage e~itd1tu marginal phtcicB1 product.

2-2
6. ( Elect–:rzl Enqineerivq b 4 Caa::ia: :ir.e is filled with E clielcrctric of relative permitivit.. 9. If C denotes the velocity of oropspatim an
ree space. the veiaci t:* of orcpaoatrnn in !ino wi! 1 be
a! 3 c

t.!     c
8 C) c / 3 !d) C / 9
7. ( Geolog< )
Plapioclase in a basalt is

(P) 121i99=1+se
8     !b) Labrndorite
!c) Albx?’e

(d) hor+.?ite
8. ( Mathematic5 1 The family of curves passing throiugh the origin and satisfying the wcration d y / d x +,dy ," dx = 0
is given bv
,(a) Y = AX + t’
(b! Y = ax

(r.1 Y = ap + t.P x (d! Y = -.be -3
7. i F’h~sics An ;deal heat er QP wnrl:s b?tiJeerI temperature 400 ). and k.. Its efficienr., 1s
!a! 3/4 t ib) (4-9) / 4
(t) 4 / (7.+4)
<d) 3 / (J+4) I(:): f Statistic? ! The mean of a hinomral ..-ariate i.-5. The ,viariar!rc cbn k.e
(a) 4 f (b) 3
(c)
Infinity

(d)
5

11. < Geography ‘!
The Southern part of Furma is most prosperocis becauEe

(a) it ha5 vast deposits of minera.1 t-e~o~it-~es
1: (b? it is the fleltalc part of mokt of the rivers of Burma
(c) it has excellent forest resources.
(d) mnst of the oil rkzcurces are found in this part of the
grauo or a Drofrssionrl
at.:ves in vocational
up the ce:;wur in their own hmd. There is no objecfion’to candidatcu using printed Apm:ication Forr and Attendance sheet, it mailable, tram private aC.ncli., am long as tww format >% er:+r.tly thr sama as pub1ish.d in this
P CODE NU1IERS FOR.CENTRES OF EXCIMINCITION
CENTRE OF EXM’lINATION
CIHVEDABAP
ALLAHBAD
RnrtwLohSE
EliOF’LIL
FO?lBF\Y
CRLCUTTCI
-564-.
CUTTACK DELHI DISPUR [Gauha t1 HYDERABAD JAIPUR MADRAS NAFF?IF’ PA1 IJA SH1LLONB SHIKLC SF:I NAGAF: TRI VANDKUH
cocwrJ
LUOt’IJOW
HADVC.’PI
RAP!Cc(I
64NGTOk’ ):OHI WA I WFHAL AGARTALA JORHAT A I ZAWAL
2t.
-5

47 34 45 4b 47
I TANfiGAR  48 
RAI FUR  49 
T I RUFCITI  fro 
V 1SHAh HCIFA’rNCIM  31 
UOA I PUR  St 
NOTEI-No  ewest for  change of  Centere or SutJect oqaginsll9 

indichted 3 the candtdstcs in the Apallcation Form shall be entertained b:. the Commission w)der mv circumotanees.
-565-
APPENDIX -11.4
EXTRACTS FROM THE KOTHARI CO)rRITfEE’S REPORT REOCIRDINO RATIONALE FOR THE SINQLE EXAMINATIaF( 8CHEME
Reasoris for a einale Scheme of Recruitma
3.14 We QOW proceed to discuss the rationale of the now scheme. Thr recponce to our guent-onnaiie, as alscr the qenwal trend of discussions whcih we had with differen? +’.PertF zhcwcd that a signi?,rant number ef 1:her fsl?
l.hat thf+-o SQocld be a single cxaminatJcn for all the services: that the randid$?es chocild b+ expossc!to a foundation training prcgramrie after selection by e:;aminatLon; and that th* tinal assessment of the suitabjlkt? ef candid:..%?z f.w-dif forcnt services should be made’ in
‘.crrms clf ?heir attributes as revealed during the course c-f their trainirlt. snd followed preferably by an aDprc.vris1.r :est.
3.13 HC1wf\*er. there was an@ther -‘if?w that since the reqilirerhents af the different services were not i3enticzl. a single selection examinetion may not be appropriate. This group felt that the two abditional SubJectS. introduced for the Indian Administrative Scrvica awl Indaan Foreign Service in 1951, did permit recruit.ment to these services of candidates with better intel lcctual and other capabilities. T’t.-s group also telt that the introduction of a single @xamination for
all the services would be mosningfi*l only if there were uniform condi tiws c’f service f3r ,I1 the services.
5-16 It mzy be recslled that the Administi-ative Reforms Commisrior, ad.2ocatcd t the institiiticn of a single examinatioc for all the Cervices. The Committee oc) Pa!jcc Traiq:na app~ictczlI-.; t5e Goverrimcnt of lndih in 1971 wldsr t.3r rh?ii-in.?csP.~pcf Dr.Y.5. Gore felt +hat c grert deal r.. mediocr,tr hnrl crot intc the !nJia-i t’o1 ice Service ..r~d tire.) attrib-iied this c@ tM :ouw r-tandards oresc-i@rd In ttie e::aminstion and to tlie lower ?3e (31 7.’ entry 2t.ip.~letodf3r the 1nd;en F’o!.i;e
‘ge~r’C*
Service. The;. "!in recomniencfed that tne o ,anination for
..
the JFS snovld be ..deiit?..=al rich that for the IAS.

3.17 Wp fu: I: :haire :w: .. iC;w= c.1 tlie 4dmir4is*.-ative F.cformr- Cc\mmi:-c;:cr8 m5 thf T-CV-F .:cummittee with PPGOrd tci a conamon c;am;rdt;qn ior :ha irivil ser.’:cc’i. iaL.ing r.ntc. account :tie r?:ievnr.t eaterii!= siipr.1 icd to 8-15 b-the barlous f?:nistr:.e; .’;~nr!+-tmerite, wh?t hdc imoressed i!5 in crmriderinq th:s w.aestior.. is that c’ven though the professional e:.rjertise required of a general administrator or E diplomat or a police officer or a member of any of tne other Central Services vary, their general’ qusli tics clf competenre.tra:ts of charrrter and sen5e of commitment necessarily have a common denominator. The same applies to other Qualities needed
t     Administrative Frcforms fommissim’s Report on Personnel Administration ( 1969 1
in an officer such as intellectual cohesion, atriculation, sense at awareness and purpo%e, integrity.. depth of understanding, coure9e of conviction and ability to respond to changing %oaio-economic ana po1it:cal sitvations.
In view of all these considerations. we recommend that there shovll be s single scheme of recruitment for the All-1r.c.i-ocd Central Service5 lirted st para 3.1.
1Scpro6uced heI cw r .
3.18 We have alrcad:! described in Chapter 1 the genera principles which form the basis of the proposed +=heme of the Civil Services E::aminatron for recruitment to the foilowing A:l ‘India and Central Services.
1ndiPC administrative ServiCQ .
lndian Foreign Servire.
Indiar. Falire ior\*:ct.
lridiar. Audit and Accortnts Service.
Indian Customs an0 Central Excise Service.
Indim Defence Accounts Service.
Indian lnromc-t.a.:.: Service(C1asr I).
Indian Ordnance Factories Service. Class I.

(Ar,.;istant ManaQers-Non-technical).
lndian Postal Service.
inoisn Posts c ielegraphs Accounts and Finance

Sergice.
Indian Railway accounts Service.
Indian Railway Traffic Service and
fiilitary Lands +nd Cantonments Service, Class I.

IBSBIBlB

CIPPENDIX -11.5
CIVIL SERVICE8 EXAMrNfiTION, 1988 Name8 ot Examination Centres
S1.No. For C.S.(Prcliminary)
Examination

I.


-.
–..

4.
3.
5.
7.
e.
9.

i1:t.
l!. tochin

12.
cuttact

13.
Delhi

14.
Dhc-war

15.
Dispur (Guwahati

16.
Fly derabad

17.
Imphel

10. 1tana? ir
19. Jaipvr
20.
Janmu

21.
Jorhat

22.
Kohima

Sl.No.
1.
-.* -.
4.
5.
4.

7.

8.

3.

10.
:1.

12.

15.
14.
15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

For C.S.(Main) Examination Ahnedabad 41lahabfid BanqaI ore Phopa1 Bombay CI1cut t A cvttecL *:handipa-h
hlkl
@aspur ;C*~.twdhlL.:b
rrderabad Jaigrtr J ammu Lucb now Madras Patna Shi1 long Shim1e Tr ivandrum
213.

24.
230
26.

27.
26.

29.
:I:, .
‘rl.

-_

LL.
.Z?. .
34.
55.
Z.6.
-7.
:.e.
33 .
Note:
-349-
Lucb naw
Nadras
Hadurai

hiagpur
Panaji (Goal
Patns
f*awt Blair
Roipar
Ranchi

S9rl :ong
Shlmla

Srinapar
.r iruoati
Trivandrrcm

V" B 1our
\’isha+.hb:;+ tnam
fjamqtob

.:~i.tn,tr~rof sub-centres for CS(Y)E::ani.’8t! -4JI\ NLtmaer a1 sub-centres for CS(N) E::am.’PC -?6
***.~t**.*

-$70-
AF’CENDIX -11.6
EXTRACTS REQARDINQ THE INTERVIEW TEST AS.INCLUDED IN
THE NOTICE FOR THE CIVIL SERVICES EXAMINATION 1988.
Inhrviow to. t
The caneidate will be interviewed by a Board who will have before them d record of his career. He will be aslcd qvestionc cm matters of gensral interest. The
ObJeC?  Of  tht?  ln*er\.lew 1s  to  B’rS@SS  the  perSOW1 
suitr3ilit-~ 0’  th~candidate  for  c  carver  in  DL:hl~r 
competent and unbissed observe-s. 
to  ivdpe the mental calibre  of  a 
term+ this  is r.szl1.t  an  assessmsnt 
lectual qua1 1ties but a!so  social 

traits and his interest in current aftairs. Some of the qiml j tips to be JuclQed arc? mental ~Iertncrr.. critical powsrs of aswmilation, clear and Log:crl e..:positinn, balance o? .ii-3gement. variety and depth of interest, ability for soi:ial cohesion and leidershio, inte! Iectual and moral intqri ty .
Z. The t(?cbr,iQue of the interview is not that of a strict cross-eraminetion but 9f a natiwal. though directed and purposive conversation which 1s intended to reveal the mental qualities of the c+ndidatc.
3. The interview test is not intended to be a test either of the specialised or penera1 knowledge of the candidates which has been already tested through their
written.p+pers. Candidates are expected to have taken an intclligen interest not on!% In their special subjects of academ c study but also In the events which are happening around them both within and outside their own state @r coiintry as wet1 as in modern currents of thought and in new discoveries which should rouse the =~irios.)ty of we1 1 adiicetej y@uth.
WPENDIX -11.7
EXTRACTS FROH KOTHCIRI COnnITTEE’S REPORT REGARDIN6 INCLUSION OF MKS OF POST TRAININO TEST FOR FINRL
WLOTPENT OF SERVICES

CIVIL SERVICES PO61 TRAININO TEST AT THE END OF THE FOUNDATION COURSE AT THE AWDEHY
3.13 The candidates selected on the basis of the
Civil .Services Main Examination (Written and Interview)
will be admitted to the National Academy of

.     Adminietration for a Foundation Course of about a year. At this stage they will not be allocated to the various services. The Foundation COWS@ will include six to eight weeks of field work. Clt the end of the Foundation Course the trainees will be interviewed by a board constituted by the UPSC. Reports on the performancelottributes of individual traineesI prepared by the Academy, will be supplied to the board. The test will carry OW marks. AllOCatiOn of trainees to the various services will be determined by the total of the marks obtained at the Main Examination and the Post Training Test.taking into account their preferences for the services.
Proposod Foundation Cour8e
4.6 We have discussed in the earlier Chapters that the trainees joining the rcorganased Foundation Course should not be assigned to the diffQrQnt services at that stage. At the end of the Course, the trainees would take
a Post Training Test conducted by a board of the Union Public Service Commission. Th.board 8hwld be headed by a member of the Comnisrion, preferably theEha1rn.n. It should anclude 8enior nenber8 ot tho rdniniwtrattve and foreign services and three to five otner experts.I*. board should have before it detail& individual reports.preparad by the Academy. on the performance of trainees during the period of the Foundation Course,
including fieldwork. The reports should aim at an assessment of the intellectual and personal qualities.
interests and attribute8 of the trainees.
4.7 We think that it shculld be possible to so schedule the Port Training Test as not to interfere with the progress of the Course. The Port Training Test board could meet at the Academy during the last two months of the Course, interviewing about 10 trainees each day. The rrsul tr, tab ing into 8ccount d@tailcd individual reports
on  the  trainees  prepared by  the  bcademy,  could  be 
finalised  within  one or two weeks after conclusion  of 
the  Foundation Course.  We recommend that tne marks  of 

the Post Training Test should be 400. This added to the marks of the Main Examination, would make a total of 3,400. The allocation of trainees to the various service8 would be determined by combining the results of
the Post Training Test and the Main Errninrtion taken before entry to the Academy.
4.0  We recommend that the duration of the Foundation 
Course  should  be at least  one  year.  The  Foundetion 
Course  should arm at de<eloprng in trainees a sense  of 
social  responsibility  an.d  help  them  to  acquire  an 

underetanding of the problems and tasks 01 development. The Course should include field e:p@rience as an essen t id1 rncredient.
4.9 The main objective of the common training programme shm.c:d be :-
to provide basic orientation to trainees regarding the cons t itutiona! . administrative. socio-economic. scientific ,,*e;hnolagical and irltsrwtional framewofb.. within wnich the:# 25 offLce.’s will need to function in cur society.
to pr@vidc 1 nowledge and understsndinq of tne process cf decision m;.t.inq in Government.
to fami:iar:zc trainees with problems of rural areas +nd afford opportunities tor indepth study on a sslszted theme based 07 ? field enquiry.
to provide ouportunities tor interaction with distinguished scholars, administrators and business e!:ecutives belonging to bif terent branches of administration and management.
4.10 In this Report it would not be possible for US to outline the detailed syllabus of the Foundation Course. We sr.cggcet that tor this purpose a Committee of experts may be constituted. The Committee may revjew tha contents of the present Foundation Course; the following shou find an important place in the new programme:-
(1     The National environment -the tasks o’f building a modern democratic state based on economic growth. social justice . secularism. national integration and composite culture. FroceFses of decision mating in government. Regulatory functions of government, specis1lv ~3 economic and industrial field:,’ and the s@cia responsibility of administrators. 1ist.s of rural and urban development. Plodern management t&hniques an6 statistics metnclds, and ttieir application to problems of plwnnin9 and put?1. ic sdainistrat ion.
iipwec1.3ti on oi IC iefirl? 1c rind techno1cgi :I !
aavancbs and ehelr impact on a3minlrtrrtl?-COG sacial drvelofmant. lntnrnational environment and its impact on ovr security, development ane foreigr, bcmamic
relations.

The academy should also provide programmes of special studies in rural development , science and technology. management. culture. and lrnpuoges which the trainees may offer 3n an optional bFsis.
4.12 The methodology of training at the &Cad-./
should emphasise identification of k.ey factors in
different sittiations and developing alternative ways of
dealing with the problems posed. There should be group
diacuasions, important place for syndicates and written
assignments. Trainirlg at the Academy. should be
e:tperience based and research oriefited. Special efforts
would be needed to develop relevarat ca5e studies from
different areas of Indian adninietration so that these
could be effectively used rn the C\cademy’r training
programme.
Considerinr the large number of trainees. the programme of field studies for them will need to be c~refull? rlsnned. The facult:: should ww). out programmes tc enable groups wf trainees to go out tor field stucly. C\ trainee should Spend si::t@ eight weeks in field war’. in a f-w-a! area eol then write a reDort which may be discvsned at the &cadem./ and evaluated b?. the faculty. This field experience sho~tld help the trainees t@better appreciate the challenges of the development ihat the country faces and the possible avenues of ~aC:irqthese pfObl@mS at the cutting +dge level of adm!.nist.ration. We regarc: this e:iperience as highly .desirable not only for Potential candidates tor
the IAS but also for members of IPS, IFS and other Central Services.
Structure and location ot thm Acadmmy
4.13 The academy. which we envisage. should be a hioh
level professional institution. It should have links with the Government at the hiahert level. It would be of great value to the Academy at the Frime Hinisten were
associated with it as Chancellor. The ooveminq bbdv of the Academy should have the Cabinet Secretary as its Frcs.tdont and ir.clrade senior officers ot the 111 India an0 Central Services and eminent public men drawn from edcrcstion. rrldiistry. and publrc life. The membership of the governing body shovld be about twelve and the period
ot  membershlp  he  of  three years (‘one  third  retiring 
ever:’  year;.  The  governing body ma'(  meet  about  four 
times  a  year. 

4.14 The Academy should be herd-d by a Dirocror of the rank of Secretary tc the Gcrvernment if ;ndi€i. He sncruld be a distinguished Sdministrator or’ a fareion service officer. or an eminent scholar with administrative crperience. The Director should be assisted by a Council of management. The Council of about 25 members should include some facu! ty members,
officer5 from the 411 India and Central Fervices. and experts from universities, Ind?an Institutes of Technology and Institutes of management.
4.13 The 4cademy s faculty should 8C a proper CniX of various age groups of high quality adnirtrators, senior
foreiQn sevice officers and distinguished scholars. The enriched and expanded faculty would provide an atmosphere ir. the Academy of a high l@vel practical professionalism coupled with rntellectual enquiry. In order to attract outstanding administrators and scholars
to join the faculty the emoluments and conditions of service of the staff shovld be adebuatc. The appointment shclvld be generally on a contract basis and renewable wher@ver considered necessary.
The CIcademy s faculty will nscd to be considerably
strengthened in numbers and qualitv so that the Academy can Play the important role enviscged far it. We suggest that the totel strength of the facL-lty. should not be
less than 50 *o begin with. for covering adeguately the wider range of sub.rects.
4.IL We ‘tave given considerable thought to the
qtrestion  of  loration  of  the  proposea  reorganised 
Academy.  Muzsoorie.  where  thc- present  Academy  is 
1ocsted.is  far  too isolated from the  professional  and 

academic life of the rountry. We have already mentioned that one o* the main objectives cf the common training programme in the Academy should be to provide opportunities for interaction with the top leadership in the academic. administrative &nd business fields and from public ljfe. This hardly possible at MuSSOOrle. In fact, we rtndorstand that most of the peoDls invited for
talks at the academy do not find it possible to accept
the invitation. This is 8 major handicap for the trainees.
This problem would be further accentuated when the Foundation Coctrsc is exsended and its auality raised. For these md other reasons, we feel that the present location of the Academy is not suitable and we are convinced that the Academy should be %hafted tram Mussocrie to d more svitable place.
Since A number r.: f+ctn-s woirld rieed to be taben into account for decidino a suitabl@ location far the Academy, and since we are not in a position to consider .\I such factors.we suggest that the Government $3;: consider this question at an early date so that ‘the rsorgamiscd Acedemy.is established without delay.
4.17 We aye not dealing lo this Repart with the post alletmcmt profeasional training vrogrammes of the 16s. IPS. IFS and other Central Scrvicer: these.we thinl., rorr:d need c revlew in the light of the reorgnnrscd Forrodation Course .proposed by us and the new problsms faced by the higher Civil Services in modern India.
:St:::::*::
CIPFENDIX -I11
CHANBES IN THE SCHEME OF IAS ETC. EXAMINATION/ CIVIL SERVICES EXAMINfiTION FROM 1947 TO DATE
YEAR OF NUMRER OF EXAMI-sueJECTS ‘ OPT IONAL NATION SUBJECTS
1  — — __  –
1947  Compulsory Subjects I- 29 
(1) English Essay. (2) General  E nalish. 
(T! Genprc,.l knowledge, 

Optional Subjects I-
(1)
Pure Mathematics. (?) Applied Mathematics.

(Z)
Chemistry. (4) Physics. (3) Botany.
(61 Zoolcg:,. 1.7) C.ec!l.o~y, (8) Engli.sh
Li.terature (9)Indian Historv. (~CJ) British
History. (111 General Economics. (12) Politics1
Science, (131 Law , (14) PhiLosophy, (15)
Geography, (16)@ne of the fvl.lowing : Latin,
French, Sanskrit, Arabic, Fersian. Spanish,
Russian, German or Chinese, (17) Statistics,

(18)
CIdvericed ficcountancy and Auditing, (19)
Mercantile Law, (20) Applied Mechanlc5,
!Zll Prime movers.
For IF’S, any of t5e two optional subjects and

for rest any of the three were allowed, to ceitrin restrictions in selection.  subject 
1948  Two optional sub~ectswere added (1) World History and : (2) International Law : : For IFS. only  31 
1949  No Change 
1950  No Change. ! Restriction for World History and Internatimal Law removed.) 
1931  Two additional subjects were required to be taken by candidates competing tor IM/I,FS from the following subjects 🙁 1) Hisher Fitre Mathematic% or Higher Appried Maths, !2) Higher Chemistry, (3) Higher f’h:Jslcs. (4)Higher eOtan;f. (5) Higher ZOOlOgY, I C. )Higher 6s~1)ogy. i7! Engl1sh ,Literature from I’.’cIc:~ to 1Y!?l.(Bilndian History from 16(:10 to the prorent day or British Conc.ti tuitional Hiotory from 13′:13 to the present dny or Eur-clpean Histor!! from 1789 to 1.878. (?)Advanced Economic Theory (‘!r advanced Indian Economics? (1O)Political Theory from Hobbes to the present day or Political 0rgani:ation and Public Cldniinis.tration, f 11) Advanced Metaphysics including Epistemology or Advanced Psychology including Experimental Psychology. (12) Arabic :Civilization including Hurlim Wilosophy or.  52 

19S2
193;
1934
1-53
I956

1957
1738

1939
1960
Pcrsiar: Civilization and Philosophy or Sanskrit Civilo-ation including Hindu Philosophy, (1:) Social Anthropology. 
Additional paper on Social Anthropology was divided into two namely Anthropology and SEcioIagy. An additional subject on Higher Geogrecahy uas added.  94 
The Additional subject -"Sanskrit Civi 1rzation inclttd,ng Hindu Philosophy" was re-.naaIed ac "Ancient Indian Civi:ization and Philosophy". 
additirbr.al subiects EF at item 12 in 1031 were changec’ *.a-:-"Medieval Civi!i=ation as reflected in ihrabir: Litera:vre 1570 AD to ibW AD\ or Medieval Civili-ation as reflected ,n Forsien :.iterature (570 AD to 1690 AD) or Anziant lndijn Civi1i:atAon and Philosopny." 
NO Chwqe. 
Pali w+5  added as one.of the optional subjects.  35 
No Chn~pe. 
NO Change. 
NO Change. 
No Change. 

-382.-
.:;..  ? :11.1  ..+ r.  ” :-:..‘!c cc 
1942  No Change. 
1063  No Change. 
1964  No Change. 
1-6s  No Chanee. 
15‘6.5  .  The Jist of.revise6  subjects >sas under  :- 61 
Optional 8ubjeCt8 8-(1) Pure Mathematics, (2)Applied Mztnematics, Statist?.cs, (4) Physics. !5) Chemistry, (6) Pet an?.( 7i 2001 ogy, (e1 Guol,ogy, ( 0) Geography. !lo) English Literature. (11)Hindi. !lZ) One @f the fo1lDwing : Clrabic. Chlncse. Crenrh, German. Let.in. Psli, Perrim. Russian. Sensl rit arid Spw.icn. (1:)InClian Mistnr:rt !J4)British tiistor.:. (17) Ei*ropean Hiit@r:,. <?&! W3r!cl C1:stor: .(I?) Cenersl Economics. (lR! Politic~I Science. (10) Philosophyt ‘:I:)! Law. (21) Public International Law. (22)Morcaritile Law. ‘X) &eva:.ced Clccoiintancy and kvditing ..’ i24) +D!if?d flcchanjcs. (25! Prime Plovers. t 
Additional Subject8 I-(1 ) Higher Pure Mathematics, or Higher Applied Mathematics. (2) Iiigner Ph:.!sics, (3) Higher Chemistry, (4) Higher Petany. (5) Higher Zoology, (6) Higher Geology, (7) fiigM+’: 

Geography. (8) English Literature, (1798-1935)
(9) !s) Indian History -1 (from Chandragupta tlnrtryr to Harsha). or (b) Indian History -I1 (The Great Mughalo -1326- 1707) or (c) Indian Histor–111 (from 1772 -1959) or (d) Pritish Constitutional History (from 1603..1950) or (e) Europci-n History (.1789-1978) I !lO) (a)Advanced Econorn! cs or (bh Pdvanced Indian Economics,
(11; :.?! Political Theory from klobbes to tho presen, dey 0′ (bl Political Organisation end Public Administration . (l:! (c) Advanced Metaph:*cics including Epistemology or (b) Advancr.cc F’syctrolOgy in= lud ing E::per imenta 1 F’sycho!3qy. (1l.l (a) Contitutimal Law of !ndm or (I.! Jurisprudence. (14) :a! Redieval Civilr"3ticc +s reflected IP ?-abic Literature (S70 u3 -.lC.Si: fi@) or ch!nPdlb;.al tivj 1;:ation 8s ref:n*:ted in fczrsj an LiterPtrtre ( 57CB AD-.165Ci W) 01 (c! Ancient Indian Civi1i:atj.o~ and Fhilosoph:,, (15)anthropology, (16! Sociology.
1967 1.     Psychology added as one of the optjonal 62 sub1ects
2.    
Prime Movers removed from the list of optional subjects

3.    
International Relations added as one of the addI+ional subjects.

1968  1.  Advanced  Accountancy and Auditing  removed 
from the list of optional subjects. 
2. Sociology  included as one of  the  optional 
subjects. 
1969.  The ianguages mentioned in the Eighth  Schedule  75 
to  the  Constitution,  other  than  Hindi  and 
Sanskrit (which were already included) added AS 
optional subjects. These are Assamese, Bengali, 
6-IJarat1, Hindi  Kannada, Kdshmiri , Mala;*alam, 
marathi,  Oriya, Punjabi, Sindhi, Tamil, Telugu 

and Urdu. 
lq7O.  The subjects (1) Law. Law. (1.) hercantile Law-I. (2)Law -11 and Latin were drCepped cpt1and1 subje.=ts. 
1971  No Change. 
1972  NO Chanqc. 
197:.  NO Change. 
1974  NO Change. 

(2)
C;rublic International 73 Law were renemed b~. (1)

(3)
Law-1×1. Spanish and from the list of the’

1975 The list cf subjects is as +ollowr : -OptlOnd subjOct8 t-
1. Pure Mathematics, (2)Applied Mathematics. (31 Stati%tLcs, (4) Physics. (S).Cheri%try, (6)
botany, (7) Zoology, (8) Geology, (9 Geography, ‘(10) English Literature, (11) One o the f~llowingt -(i) Assamese, (ii) Bengali,
(iii) liiljrrati, (iv) Hindi, (v) Eannada, (vi) Kashmit-j. (vii) Malayalam, (viii) Varathi, (1×1 Oriya, (x) Puwabi, (xi) (a) Sindhi-Devnagari
(b)
Sandhi-Arabic, (xii! Tamil, (xiii) Telvgu and (,:.iv) Urdu. (12)one of the following : –

(1)
CI*-abicl (3i) Chinese. tiii! French (iv) German. (v! Pali. (vi) Persian (vii) Pussian. (~~11~ (17) lndian History. (14)

Sansb:rit, Eritic-h History, (15) European History. (16) World History. (17! Genera! Econamicc, (18) Polit2ral Science, (19). Philosophy, (XI) Psychc.!t-9yr (21)Law-I. (22! Lbw-11. (Z?! Law-111, !24: Applied Plechbnics. ‘25) Sacic+lo@y.
Hlgher Optional Subj,ectm I-!I! la! Hiahrr Fvre Mathematics or (b! Higher ArpplJsd Vsthematics. (2!Higher Physics. (7) Higher Chemistry, (4)Higher Fotany. (3! Higher Zqolotp. (6) Higher Geology, (7) Higher Geogrirahy, (8) English Literature, !17W-1935),(9) (a) Indian History-I (Chandrrgupto Maurys to Harsha) or (b) Indian History-I1 (the Great Mughalo) (1326-1707) or (c) Indian History-111 (from 1772-1950! @r (4) British Constitutional History (from 1603 to-1930) or
-587-
(e) European History (from 1871 to 1945), (lO)(a.) Advanced Economics or (b) FIdvanced Indian Economics, (11) (a) F’olitical Theory from Hobbes to the present day or (by Political Organisation and Public Administration and !c] International Relations, (121(a! Advanced Metaphysics including Ep.istrmology or (b) Advanced Fsycho1,ogy including E::perimcntal Fsychology, (13)(a) Constitutional Law of India cx-!h! Jurisprudence, (14)(a! Medieval Civilization as reflected in Arabic L*iterature 
(570 AD -1650 AD) or (b) Medieval Civiliz3tion as reflected in Persian Literature (570 AD-Lt90 AD! or !c) Ancient Indian CivilLzation and Philosophy. (15) Ant-hropology, (16) Advanced Sociology. 
1-76  No Change. 
:i.Y77  NO  Change. 
197C  No  Change. 
IS70  From this year, three tier system of examin?tion, consisting of Preliminary Examinatian, Main Examinat1,on and Interview Test_ was introduced on the reiommendations Of the "Kothari Committee". 
PreliminWy Examination compulsory paper on Gei’,;.-al  consisted of One Studies (150 marks)  19 

-588-
and on? optional subject (300 marks) out of
the total of following 19 optional subjects : –
Aqricul ture: Botany, Chemistr:., Commerce,

Econom:cs, Enqineering (Civil, Electrical or

Mechanical 1, Geography, Geology, Indian
History, Law, Mathematics,. Philosophy, Physics.

Political Science. Psychology. Sociology,

Zoolo).. .
Such of thosir candidrtcs. who qua1ifie6 the the F.re1irnins.r-y Esamrnatron were colled for the Main Bmmination, which consisted cf one 31 qualif-.,ing paper on General English. one qrlaIif.ting paper on India- larip..rage( out cf the 15 3%. per the Eighth 5chedulh to th@ Cons+i*:ution . two Dap6rs cn General Studies ( carry>*)? XO marCs each-Tntai 600 marks) itnd
two bCtlOnd suhjec:s af twc. pagers ezch
(carrying 7.00 marks each-Tatnl ot 1XKi marks)
out cjf a total of frl1:owinq 41 optional subjects :-
Agricul tcrrc. Botap::. ChemictrZ. Commerce C Accountancy. Economics. Engineering(Civi1, Electrical or Occhanical), Geography, Geology, History, LAW-Literatlire of one. of the followinQ langucqes :-As~amese. Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannade, Kashmiri, Oarathi, Malayalam. Oriya, Yunjabi, Sansl’rit, Sindhi, Tamil. felugu, Urdu, Arabic, Persian, German,
French, Russian and English, Management end
Public &ministration, Ilathematlcs, Philosophy,
Folitical Science & International Relations,
Physics, rsychology, Sociology, Zoology.
1980     NO Change.
fWl     Five new optional subjects vi:.(i) Animal Hc!.sbandry and Vcterinar-r Science (11) Statistics. (111) Anthropology and lztcratitrer of (iv) Pall and (v) Chinese were added tc the list of optional subjects in Main €.:aminatlo-. (Total Optional subjects in Main €::amination -46!.
The subjects (1) Animal HUSDdnOry and Vaterinrrry fcicrlce and (ii)Statistics were xWad to the list of options1 subjects for the F’r’ctitxinary €::+miriation. (Tc~tal optional subjects in the +el imiqary €..amination -21!
tsB2     NO Change.
lueg     NO Change.
1-94     ,NO Change.
198S.     NO Change..
190h     NC Change.
lW7     The subject Management and Public
Administration which was originally introduced in 1971 far tho Main Examination was bifurcated into two scrbjects in 1907 vi:.(i) Management and 1.1) Public Ada.inistration for the Main Examinet\on.(Tatal optional subjects for the Wain E sfination -47)
The cubJect Public fidrninistration was also introd..~ced 13 the h-el:min Iry t~amlnation. !Total Optiondl sub)ects for the Preliminary E::?minntton -?:I
1300 NO Change.
APPENDIX-1V

BIERVICE6 FOR WHICH RECMIITENT I8 HRDE THROUOH THE EXISTXNB SCHEME OF CIVIL SERVICE8 EXMINATXOlY
All India Sorvlm

1.    
Indian Admin’istrative Service

2.
Indian Police Service Contra1 Sorvicos, Group ‘A’

1.  Indian Foreign Service 
LIa.  Indian Income Tax  Service 
7C).  Indian Customs k Central Excise Service 
4.  Indian Ckrdit & Accounts Service 
5.  lndien Railway Traffic Service 
b..  Indian Railway FIccounts Service 
I.  Indian Railway Personnel Service 
8.  cost of Clssistant Security Officer Protection Force  in  Railway 
9.  Indian Civil Accounts Service 

10.
Indian Oranance Factories Service "on-techniczl)

11.
Indian Defence CIccounts Service

12.
Indian Defence Estate Service

13.    
Indian Postal Service

14.    
Ineian Posts 6 TBicgraph C\ccounts 6 Finance Service

13.     Post ot Assistant Commandant in Central Industrial
Security Force

16.    
Central trade Service

17.    
Indian Intormation Service

Orwp ‘B’
1.    
Central Secretariat mrvice (Section Ottic-r’s Grade) ‘

2.    
Railway Board Secretariat Service (Section
0fticmr.s Grade)

3.    
Armed Force8 Headquarters Civil Service (Asstt.Civilian Stati Officers Qradc)

4.    
Customs Appraisers Service, Group B

5.    
Delhi and Andanan b Nicobar Island8 Civil Service

6.    
Delhi and f3ndnmen C Nicobar Island Police Service

7.    
Pondicherry Civil Service

8.    
Pondichcrry Police Service

tttttttllt
APPENDIX -V
EXTRACTS FROM THE BWKLET ON CIVIL BERVICE BELECTION BOARD PUBLISHED BY CIVIL EERVICE CORMIBEION Of U.K.
CSSB (pronwnced SizzPe) 19 a nan-resilentiri awser-smont centre located at 24 Whitehall,, close to many of the gavernmsnt departments from which most of its acsessors are drawn. It is responsible for selectino grbduste-calibre entrants who are expected to rerch the hj.ghc?r levels of the Civil Service at a relatively %?I1:. rge.
Qccelerrted promotion in the Civil Service can toilow mdnv different mths. starting from entry points AL. daverr,a a= qeneral roministrrtron. cc3nDmic @r stst:t!.sticai aqvic~.engineering or science mmapement. ficrordingLy CSSB rLmS B wide range of selection schemes corr.esponding to ea::h entry.
Ir; ill the c,r,hcmes the standards for success bre high. CSSB *ssesces each crndidate s past schiegements (as chown by academic end career recores) and personal qualities !including the ability to wort with other%) as we-11′ 3s tab.inq arzount af gualites of intellect. Its procedures -the blend cf written tests, written and or+l .exc%rciscs. and interviews -vary .from scheme to :
scheme according to the particular requirements of each entry. But CSSP’s objective is always to establish a
clear  picture  of  each candidate’s own  qualities  and 
potential  tc.  follow his or her preferre d path  in  the 
Civil Service. 

Intervirus play an important part in all C5SP’s lw-ocadurrs. Dvt even the best conducted interviews ?.ntroduce an .:1rsment of sub2ectivity which can ma)..e them less than wh~:lyreliable.
This ?c-the main reason why the Civil Ser\*ice
Commissioners have long regarded it zs essential ta supp!ement them with yecia1lv designed job-related tests and 0’c-err.ises, maoy @f which are obJectl’Jel?’
mcded. Drarirq +F it does on this wider information. _. the CSSk aser*ssment centre DrOCedLtre ha3 been toilnd +@ aa1.c a mc?rf; +=curate prrdict) on @t snbseq~.lent performance at work tnan could be derived from interviews alr,re. lhese predictions have been validrted during the f:rty and more :ie+rs since CSSP wzs sot clp. Other wblir: and private sector emp1o;Jers in this country and oversea.6 are increasingly turning to similar procedures in an effort to achieve comparable leaels of prediction and fairness to candidates.
WHO cwa TO CSSB ?
When YOU attend CSSB it will soon become clear that here is no such thing as a typical candidate. The
range extends from final year undergraduates to people with an sstablrshedrtareer who are seeking a chsrqe of direct!m. Candidates come from all walts of life and
marry have already beep emplcyod in areas such as romT..erce. zndu~try and engineerinq, education and local go\terrimen:, the voi~mtrr:~ and .~curr)alirm.
sector
When specific educational, qualif ications are required for any Fcheme involving attendance at tSSB the regulztions z@ncerned will set them out.
10~1. but b/ no scans all. candidates rt CSSB
twde. cr o:.t>F?Ct socm +c. recievc.m honovrs degree or the eqiciv+lont. For certain pasts the si.ch~f?ct of your degree may oe impcrtnnt: for e;:amD,le. if you wish to perscie a Career chat makes c85e of your training in ecQnomicB. st~ti.strcs. enr~ineering or one cf the applied sciences.
For other schemes the Subject cf your degree 3s immateriai. The requirement is for you to demonstrate a range and level of academic. personal and intellectual abilities that car) be put to effective u’se in the Civil
Service. This is very much the case for the 6mpOintmentS in Administration schems which includes trainee administrators in the nome and Northern Ireland Cavil
Service, grades 7 and B of the Diplomatic Service. the Clerkships of thc House 0-f Commons and House of Lords. rnd the Tax lnspectorate -for whom CSSB also runs a seperate entrv scheme.
CSSB wlsc sees people who joined the Civil Service direct from school. or who went strdight from school loto it*.other Career. If you do n@t have forms.] degree-level WR: tficztions. your intrl lertusl stsndinq 1s ASSesSefl f*rimrrily on the basis nf :*our ecord 13 emplovment tc..iothc?r with ymtr pertormafico at CSSB. This evidence of t w affective use of intellectual ability is particularly rmportaet in the ca0e of older candidates.
+’divercity of talent-, is ezrential .in the moaein
riv:l Service. and tho fact 1.5 that siiccassfnl candidptos *r~cl*.tde those with taw +@-ma1 academic qua!:ficationc -3swe11 3% those witn outstanding first-class and l-.,phcr degrees. 10 rvbiects ranging fr@m
lWgu?geS d’til 1 itorcturo to the social and natural sciences.
WWLIT IS CSSB LIKE 3
CSSB aims to be businesslike and friendly. It sees about 3N:W candidates eacn year and is designed to €elect from them the people who will go on jn bue covrse to fill responsible and influential pasts. Incvitabl-y,
and rightly, the atmosphere reflects its professional obJective. Put it is as much in CSSP’k ~nterertas yours to find out just *hat ym can offer, end accordingly the emphasts is on estrbli&~ing’an environmme"fn which you will be able to produce your best pattormmct.
The setting at 24 !Jhitehrll is comfortable, thovgh fa-f,-cm lavish. On 3 finn dsy there is a unique view
rcr.csc  the  roofs  of  Horseguards  and  Whitehall  to 
Westminister  fibbe*# and Bt.  Jane’s PzrC.  Althovgh  the 
bched~il~at CSSE  IS  tight.  t.hore will  be  opportunities 

to cetch your breath: all candidates have the use of a common mornI there is A,MI@~~:# of periodicals. ard
-t
co++oe is aurilabie az. , the timetnble allows. A? lrincht ime there id access to a subsldised Cutcteria.
Soon’ ‘ctter ycir! +rrive yoit wlll meet ather members af :he grouD irs whjch YO~IW’J: bo worlinq throt.tOhorit :’our time at CSSb. Cawlidates usually wor): in qret-tcs of five. although groups of three, four or SIX msy be used es required. There will normall! be several qroctpr. perhaps at many as twelve and from more than one scheme. attending CSSP at the same time. Each qracip is asr,j.Qnnd to a team of assessors. The precise number and composition af these teams varies bqtween the selection schemes: all teame are widely e?:perienred nnd each member has been specially trained in pcrSmne1 $.elect ion.
-398-
Once all the candidstes have arrived, a member of the CSSB staff will explain the procedure for your chosen schemc. You w?ll already have read the briefing material sen: to you before your arrival at CSSB; but the aim is to make quite sure that yocl know what is ahezd of you ocfore you move on to your first exercise. It is importknt +.o remember that sssessment at CSSF is continuous. .-acr.prehensivc and. above a! 1. cumulat.~vc. Tests. e::erclFes and interviews tcllow one anotqer ~n tapid succe’sion. but no firm .ludgement is mrde rmti: rl 1 the e\’l.-tncn 15 available and ha§ been caref:.rli.f considered. !bere 28 always opportuci ty to reccwzr frcm
z. slit. tlo.*nwrzr :.X*sDlCL13btS. ’ SC. do QOt let ,:@he
.. –
mlscalculatio-throw you aff balance. It is 3 -very untisiisl cendsdate who will feel catx,sfied w1t.n +.he performance w. or she prodciced ct e\.’e::y stage of c JLC;~: to CSSB.
The range and balance of qualities CSSB is loohing
for varies somewhat between the different selection
schemeB, but high intelligence which can be put to practical use is always a central requirement. This means showing conimonsmse. foresight and an application of what is practicable as well as strong intellect.
Where appropriate. an adequate level of expert se in

your chosen soeciality is also essential. In a 1 the posts fcr which CSSB selects. the ability to communicate effectively with other people at all. levels is an Wvortant attribute. fSS0 does not rnolyse your social gr>CeS. .but you must expect your assessors to tbhe an interest in your capacity to operate effectively with a Q~@IW of colleagues. In particular they will consider :ow potential for managing people.
Other areas to which your’ assessors will pay attention are: ability to think quantitatively (or be trained to do sc!; drive and determinstion: readiness to accept responsibility: and awarencess of what is going cn in the outside wnrld. Pluch of the work of the Civil Service affects the Iifo of the citrzen. snC CSSB wjl: be Iaob~nj for ev:.dence of tolerance. t?ufianit:* anl integrity. motivation 1s Important. but not in tho narrow sense of be:ngt in career terms. exclu?.ivclv interested in the Civil Service. And because S~.ICC~OJ~U~ entrants will be worb.;ng in part of a iarge crrlblic arganrsation under the u:timate i3uthority z~fPlinrsters, e::cec-sive personal ambition is ctn)iGely to be sriitable. VOW rercwd. the CSSB exercises and interviews Will all p-ovibe you and your assessors with a full opportunity to cover this round.
CSSP is also loo, ing for intel lectual aptitudes that are rel+ted to work in the Civil Service. 411 schemes at CSCB use objectively marhed cognitive tests to help assess these aptitudes. Some tests look. at your ability to use uords and lapguage, others measure your understanding of information set out in graphs and
r‘
tables -though without requiring’ any high level familiarity w1I.h mathematics or srithmatir. Others are framed in such A day that no mount of sk.311 with words or numbers will ne ?imy help. and sheer problem-solving nbilit?. comes into play. Each person’s score in theee tests car be compared with the perfwmance of miny other people who have taken them. in this wav each candidate’s v*lative’ standrnp ‘car. ’ be imprrtlPl1;~ assessed. Resrssrch has shown thpt performance in these tests is vsetvl and intormative. irnd Sivss a sotrnd indicatior~ 01 later performance at work in the jobs c.n which they rel+?e. I3r.t. rtseful a5 these tests ace. 10-ofre’s SUCCESS at the selection stage will depond nn them alone.
WHAT HAPPENS AFTER YW HAVE LEFT CSSB ?
Your aswssors wi 11 comoare notes throughout the time you are %tCSSB: they will errhanqe impressions gained from each stage of ?he procedure, identify points
that should not he overlooked in SUbSCQUent interview,
and will discuss. modivy and develop their estimation of
each candidate. But t.hc final conference, held after

have left, is the time when the assessors stand back,
pull together the strands of evidence, aria reach their final assessment taking account of the requireabnts and standards appropriate to the scheme for which you have rpplled.
Great care IS taken in the final conference to draw on all the Information availshlo ta the assessor3. Waterisl from your record and retereneces will be csnsiderpxl along with your overall performance ~t CSSP. inrlv@.lng a11 the tests, exercises and interview%. To help them evaluate all ths qualities whim the!, a-e loding . the assessors will use a rating scale whicn pCcwn’.s + procile of the attributes required by the scheme in question. lhesc scales are completed for each candldrte by each assessor. independently and then in dis:ussion.
The list of qualities on the rating scale may susqest a search for prrfect.ion, but the dssessors do not eypect paragons and appreciate that most People will be stronger in some areas than others. At the final conference the assessors -look at each candidate as a whole porsan. and many different oatterns of abilities are acceptable.
Once a’l the evidence has been weighed and your
final mark agrqod. ezch assessor will write a report dn
you. Thebe reports provide a permanent record of the
assessor% v‘ews. It you are already in the Civil
Service or take up an appointment, the reports will be
sent to the c*ersonnel Division of the department you
work for. -his should allow you to receive some
feedbirch on ywtr performance and may help :n !’our Caresr
development. No in-Serbjcr candidate wi:l be perts1:EeO in later ca-eirr becaue of lack of OIJCS~SS in the special circ~tmstances of CSSE. If yov are not succecsful at CSSB and pctrsve a career outside the Civil Service, it
2s not possible to otfer feedbacb or). berformancc in the
selection proreditre.
For moct recrui+ment schemes CSSP’s assessment i~ the last stsq.? of the selection proce&tra. But zn some $=heme5 CSSS c sssessment leads to an invitetion to attend the final Selection Board (FSB!. FSB will see ail candidates whom CESB has placed above the line and elso those whom it has concluded fall just below the, standard of scceptaSility. FSB will tale CSSP’s
assessment fully into account, and will probe any ~~intb adentified in the assessors’ reports: the conclusion FSB
reaches wiri be its oun vier, based on all the available evidence, including the performance it sees.
FSB us~tally has five members and you rill be notified of who they are. Normally the Board is chaired
the First Civil Service Commissioner or his. deputy. Two members are r!snslI:/ senmr civil servants. Arlnther is c.ften from industrial or camniercial management or the tr+@eunions. .and the fifth from a vniLersit:. The inter.:iew lasts thirty-f ive minutes and F5’iZ:’s q:tsstior.s are sesrching. The situation is necesserily ratkr mncr formal than CSSP, but rod can be sure that the bard is
I.
slw+;.s hcpefull znd well disposed. ?he i’oom there rill ba an unhurried  Once :’a11 discussion  hz-va left 3.ofr.I-e .. 
?he fine! decisisn is rseched 

The sribceq.ien? placing of s sv=cPsstvl cc.r.g.! jg te IP. the Home Civil Service is the rcsponsibi\it~~ ‘.he
cf First Commixloner. according to the current ncogja nt deo3rtaer.t~ snd tab irtg account. EE far as 70sfit;i. of the cmO? date’ 5 preferences.
A FINAL YORD
No-one who succecds in the selection process will have their s.ubseqttent career in the Civa1 Service starred or scarred by the m,.. to they receive. Success
at CSSB indic-tes potential to grow and develop. drawing on the Service’s many opportunities for further learning, thr-xtgh tarasl training and direct worb experience. It is performance in the job which counts and is the bssis for prcmction. It is worth noting that about half &he most senior posts in the Civil Service are filled by people who d~dnot. come throuqh CSSB.
Only .1 (*ilsOrit.y of the candidatos Wht Come t0 C%E:
wil 1 be sucCrlszf?il. The procedures in each scheme arc-
clesigned wit-a particular range of qua!ities in mrnl.
reflecting th? req\ii;ements of accelerated promotion in the Civi Sw:i;:e. Lack of success at CSSP simpl:? means that on one oc.:?sior, the particular qualities the Service 1s .:>oping tor were not demcnstrated to the reqci.irad e::ten+.. Mznv candrdstes will go on to male successful ccre(+-C- r?Isewht~e. cr wil I perhaps tr., aaalr* etter a gsp ist b ?ear or more. In such cases the CSSE: process =tar?% from scratch and the assessors have nC. sight of the F?ar:ie’ reports until they hade made uD their minds afresh. Su:cess at a second or ‘ later attempt is far from uncommon if, through self-development and experience. a candidate is able to demonstrate the potential that will enable him or her to
meet the job specification and to rise quicC.ly in the Service.
Whether you arc attenting CSSB for the first time or as a second comer, the best approach is to be positive. but re1a::ed. Expect to work hard and aim to g~vaof your best. You gn be sure .the CSSB will weigh it with the utmost care, and will regard you from first to last as an individurl in your own right. Experience iuogerts that yau will find :tocar time at CSSB :ntcrsnt:nj and even. in rrtrohpect. enjoyable.
8i.***I*t*
AePENoIX -VI RECRUITMENT TO TM CIVIL SERVICE IN FR-
8
1. The French State is unitary and cmtralised, represented in each of the 101 departamnts (units of local Oovernment by a Prefect who acts as the representative of the Government. The
’Prefectoral Corps’ is one of the corps of administrators. which form the bureaucracy in France.
2. At the Centre are 15 Ministries, each of which LS subdivided into ‘directions which utilise the staff and line functioparies necessary to cater to their administrative wquiremen tb.

J . Over and above these Ministrieb is an administrative super elite -the members of the ‘Cranes Corps . Thebe include the technical corp6 such as the Corps des miner; !Corps of Mines 6 Mxnerals) and the Corps de8 pants et Chaussess (Corps of Civil engineers for Bridges 6 Roads) and the non-technical Corps such as tho Conseil d’Etat (Council of State). Cows des Comptes (Courts of Public Accounts) and the Inspection des
1 This paper has been prepared by MS. Halini Thodani an
officer of the Indian Revenue Service,
(Income Tax), uho was a student of the Cyclo 8pocla1
Enranger at the ENA in 1986-1987.

Finances (Crops for the verification of the State’s Finances and expenditures). Till 1943, recruitment of functionaries into the Grand. Corpk,, the Corps Prcfactoral and each of th. 13 Ministried was on a fragmented basic with each of the Corps and Hinistries making its own selection.
4. kfter the Second wor d War and the advent of General Charles De Gaulle in 194s. it was felt that recruitment to high offices in the civil administration in France needed to be modernised.
3. Wter 1945. extensive reforms tiera undertaken to broaden the recruitment bare and bring about uniformity in the selection process. The aim was
to open recruitment of civil servants to a broader

spectrum of applicants, 
to  instil  a  common  wtlook  among  all 
administrators. 
to  reduce or to remove entirely the  cloying  spe-

cialisation and concomitant compartmentalisation
that had emerged trom separate recruitments to
different Corps and 6ervice8.

6. The first step was through reforms of the eduction systm Till 1945, there was but one private school -The Institute of Political Scienc~ at Pwii, which prepared students for a career in public ad.ini8trtion. this perforce restricted the number of 8uitable candidates for public services to thaw, who had aCC.88 to the School, to the Parisian8 and the qlite Reform Wont, therefore, the nationalisation of this school and the creation of other similar institutions in Other parts Of the country to provide training in the political sciences as preparation for a career in public service. The neMt step was the creation of a Corps of Civil Admini8trators". who would be the products of a Common training and who would then be assigned to perform in-, the various Corps and MinistPies. These administrators were to be selected to posts for which they were found suitable. To administer to the needs of the "Civil Administrators", to manage their recruitment, training and formation. a National Bureau of Administration-‘lo Direction de la fonction publique was created. And finally, the administrative reforms saw the creation of
the Ecole Nationale d Administration- the National School of Administration which was established to provide a common administrative training.
7. Recruitment 01 Civil !hrvants ip today, except for a few modifications and change8, much the %.me a8 ‘had barn envisaged in 1943. Access to the EN@ is possible mainly for two tym of candidates -tho externd recruit, fresh trom University, with at least focr years of University education, and the intrnal recruit -a pub1i.c tunctionary who has worked in the lower echelons of public service tor at least five years.
0. Both internal and external aspirants have to qualify for entry to the EN6 by passin.g a ‘9eries of Tests- written and oral. The following personnel are ineligible to take the entrance tests :-
(A)    
those persons already employed in ServicesKorps for which the EN& had earlier trained them.

(b)
candidates who were found inadequate in the course of their training at the ENA and have been asked to –

i repeat the training afresh:
ii join a lower public office t or
iii have been expelled from the ENA.

9. Each candidate can attempt the Entrance Eermination for the ENA a maximum of three times.
LO. In certain cases, the age limit ot 27 years tor the external and 36 tor the internal candrdates can be relaxed. These are tor
-handicapped person%
-    those undergoing national/military service
-mothers/tathers of single parent tamiliee
11.
An offical order (Llrrete) as passed in the month of February calling tor applictions trom 1ntermt.d candidates, which have to 6e subnitted totho EN6 by July. the order is made public by announceaent in the Journal Offcial (i.e. the Ofticial Gazette).

12.
The written examinations are conducted in Paris and in %ow other cities, .in the month of September each year.

13.
The oral interviews/exanin~tions are conducted in
Paris.

14.
Marks are calculated on a scale of 0-20 points and are mUltip1ied by the number of co-efficimt% allotted to each emmination/test. Thus. each candidate can get a maximum ot 58~points. The Scheme ot the internal and external exaninations is outlined in Appendices VI.1,

VI.2 end VI.3
I1 TWININB AT TW EM
15. The recruitment proeeer does not terminate at the selection of a candidate worthy of entry to the EM. the entrance examinations serve merely to short-list the candidate8 who. during a twmty-tour month training prograw conducted by tho EM, are evaluated on the basis of their portornance in varloum administrative
disciplines and are finally evaluated and placed in the grand. corps of the minirteriak corps, depinding on thelr position in the merit list and their personal preference.
16.
The number of citndidates varies from year to year. From 1987 onwards, the total number of entrants to the

17.
The Erua dw.’;des the training/evaluation of the prooationary students into two stages t

ENA  has  been  restricted t3  about  80.  Eighty  four 
entrants  have  been  selected  in  the  examinations 
concluded in September,  1986. 

(a)    
12 months ot ‘training oh-the-job followed by

(b)    
1Z months of academic courses at the school I tself .

18. Evaluation of the students in the course 07 the on-the-job-training is done by the directors of the ENA. Academic performance too is evaluated by the directors of the ENA assisted by special’ist examiners contracted for this specific purpose. Six months before the end of the total training period, the office of the Prim Minister announces the vacancies and posts which are open to the probationary students who exercise their Sbrvice options and are chosen on the basis of their pertormance an6 marks tally at the end of the24 month. training period, keeping their options in view.
For entry to the diplomatic corps ,homver, th.
cqndidates must be fluent in at leant two toreign
languages.

19. It, at any stage during the training period it the ENA* it is felt by the Director of the EN6 that the pertorrance of any one of the candidate8 is unsatisfactory, he can, with the sanction of the Administrative Council of the EN&* recommend to the National Bureau of Public AdniniStratAOn, any one of the following optionrr-
a)     that +he cnadidate repeat the academic course work at the ENA
OR
b)     that ths candidate be relegated to appointment in the Corps of attaches ot the Central Administration (akin to the Central Secretariat Sorvice in IndAa)
OR
c) that the candid+* be expelled from the ENA.

20.
On passrng out ot th, ENA and on entry to any one of the French Civil Services, each candidote nunt sign a ten year bond to 6erve the State.

21.
Any student who does not, for any reason whatsoever, conplete the course qf traininq at the ENA,

or fails to sign the aforementioned bond, must reimburse to the Government the salrry/stipend that helshe ha8 received dkiring training at the EM.
22. The mission of the EN6 is to give professional training to the future pttblic officials. Its goal is to contribute to the Will of the administrators rn adapting themselves to the evolutionary, everchanging
environment,  and  to  train  bureaucrats,  who  will 
themselves  become  the verita ble factors of  change  in 
socLetY. 

..-. b’eeping in mind the diverse careers for which the ENA trains its 8tudentS. the training idparted therein is inter-disciplinary in nsture. carefully a~oiding any superfic:el specialisation. This is all the more important af-vieu of the inter-ministerial change-ability c.f functionrries in the French administrative set-up. Moreover, the EN6 does. in its pedagogy recognise the Civerse educational bactgrounds of its students. Its aim finally, IS to impart bnowledge, which will be in addition to that already acquired by the students.
24. The students to be trained .at the EN6 have diverse educatmnal/vocational attributes and do not hnow till the end of their training, the Services/Corps/C.dres to which they will finally b6 selected.
23. Above all, the aim of the EN6 is to ensure a sense
of public service, loyalty to the goals and objectives
of a homogeneous Qovernnmt.

26. In view of the abovo constraints, the goals of tho EM can be thus divided as follows t-a) to furnish information on fundamental subjects of administrative import;
b)     to familiarise the students with th. diverse management tools which are crucial to the Administration:
C)     to develop an innovative rpirit in the students, by having thmn participate in research and
.*
solution-finding projects.

27.
Students at the EM are contronted with ma1 problems and are motivated to reflect on the functioning of the Administration. They are thus encouraged to conceptualiee and to seek solutions to the problem8 taced by the Administration.

On-Line Job Training

28.
Irmgbidtely after entry to the EM, students ark sent tor on-the-job training –

for six months in an enterprise/industry; and
b) for six months within the abministration.

a) training in lneustry

29. The objective of this period of training is to give public administrators an insight into mbnagement techniques utilised by the private sector. Often, private industrial organisations have different and more efficient means of achicvlng their ends. An appreciation of these techniques may lead to innovation and efficiency in public administration.
-.
A>. This period of training can be imparted either in France or abroad, as decided by the Director, Training of the ENA.
b) Training within th. Administration
31. In a reversal of conventional practice, the EN4 integrrtes its stuaonts directly into the pract cal experiences of 1nternShiQ within the Administration. In this way, it is felt that academic concepts are better appreciated in relation to administrative problems.
-___. The ranqe of Administration withsn which a student crrn get trained is vast. It ranges from the Prefectures (akin to District Cldministratfon in the Indian milieu) to the French Embassies in various countries, to llunicipal Governments -vi:. the Office of the Mayor of a cLty, or the General Council of locally elected representatives or, the Regional Council of a Regam. (France is divided into 101 Departnents~ each
with a locally elected General Cwnqil, Several Departments combine to torn the 25 Regions, which, in
turn,  have  their  Regional  Councils,  tormed  by 
representatives  from  the  hneral  Councils  in  each 
Region). 

33.
During thQ period of internship, be it in tho Administration or in. an Industry, a representative of the ENA visits each student to assess his/her partormancc in consultation with the otficial to whom the student has been attached.

34.
At the end of internship, each student has to submit a written report on his/her pertormanee perceptions during training and an evaluation is made on the basis of :-

a) the hssessment of the student by his trainer, b) the impression of tna Director of Training during his
visit to the student, c) the written submissions of the student, d) the interview with the Director of Training.
35. The final 12 months are spent in the school where the students receive training in the tollowin9
subjects 8-
1.
Drafting of judicial texts

2.
International issues

3.
Economy .

4.
Pub1 ic Hanagement

5.
ComputerCElectronic eat. processing

6.
Omtitative analysas.

7.
Oral expression and negothtim techniques

8.
One or two foreign languages.

56. LInot.her important aspect of the course worl is the submission of two group study reports -one on social ouectlons and the other -the Seminar Report -on a srtbje:t pre-determined by the ENLI. The first report is subaitted after a brief two week study and the 6econd after dr. t*:.*.cnsive51: mor.th research o? the suSJect.
.*

-.7. The -.!mnes chosen for the Seornar Reports in the yea’s 1965-67 were as follows: lVS -Financial Rklations between the Centre and the
Lecal Governme-ts

-Export Trade in Francs I984 -The klniriistrrtlon ef the State
-The kdministration of the Autanomous French Territories
-Civil Sc=urity
1987 -Education Policy
-The National Health Programme.
38. Other fields of study, which arc optional in nature. include rapid reading COU~~OS,addio-visual techniques, and non-formal methods of education.
39.
At the end of each compulsory courme, written examinations are conducted, the evaluations of which bear import on the Sinal paint tally 80 vital in deciding the careers of the tuture bureaucrats. The two Group study reports have to be defended orally and in writing, with the oral defence being both individual and in group.

40.
It is thus clear that candidates complete their training in administration and are finally selected. through the process of constant evaluation, and on the basis of their per foraamce, to the ~rvicer/Corpd?C.adre. of their choice, to commence their careers in the French Administrative System.

41.
At first plance, the french and the Indian systems of recruitment show some fundamental similarities. Recruitment in both countries is the charge of an independent impartial body, created for that specific purpose. A common entrance examination is conducted tor the selection of future bureaucrats. who underpo a phase of training, both academic and practical, before commencing their careers in public service.

42.
A closer look. at the two systems would, however, reveal many difference.. The most glaring dissimilarity is in the point ot selection to a Service/Corps/Cadre. In India, this is done on the ba8is of’ a candidate’s

performance in the Civil Services Examination and hislher service preferences. Training at the L.P.S. National CIcademy of CIdministration and other Academies and Instituter is merely a preparation ot the candidates for the Jobs that they will perform in their allotted Services. In France, on the other hand, recruitment as Ln ttdo stages, with tne entraqce examinrtion +or the EWCI serving merely to shortlist the persons found suitable to be .trained as public abmiroistratorc. These per5or;s are then evaluated in the course of their two year trainit-p period at the EN&, which determines their poc.ition 3n tne merit list and thereafter. the a1 location of servic.e/corps by preference.
47.. another area @f dissilimarity is in the recr~litmen.;’selec+.ion of Class I1 Officers. In lnlia 2s in Frwoce, about :4::of kigb ‘revel posts ( termod 25 class 1 services in India) are reserved for persons already in Government Service. In India. the upQradation from Class I1 Services to Class 1 Services is tJonc by a review of the earlier performance wthin the Class I1 Service and upgradation within the same Service itself with no provision for any special training: In France. on the other hand, the ‘promotee" functionaries have to tab.e an entrance examination as taxing as that for the direct officers: for entry to the ENCI. Once selected, these promotqd ofticers’ are as much subjected to evaluation as their directly recruited
younger colleagues and have to perform-at par with, a11
their colleague& in order to gain satistactory positions
in the final merit list.

44. A common training, with identical academic inputs throws up, in an equitable fashion, the best candidates to the top of the merit list. Since their evaluation is identical, the calibre ot each candidate ran be judged on a common basis, although they have diver8e academic/vocationol background. At the end of the training, tests are conducted on the common subjects relevant to administration.
This ida positive advantage over a system where, inspite of attemots at standardisation of marks, the vagaries of performance and assessment in dilferent subJectr could result in unJust evaluations based on which candidates would or would not get the Service of their choice.
45.
In France. candidates have to wait for two years before knowing the Service/Corps to which they will belong. It could also come to pass that their performance having been rated as low towards the end ot their training, recruits may be asked either to repdkt P year of training at the EM. or join a lower civil service, or even be expelled trom the ENA.

46.
In France, internal cand’idates could have prolonged preparation time ranging from one to threm

years before they take the entrance examiantion tor the €NA. This would mean a hiatus of a possible five years (Three years preparation time plub two years trhining) before the candidates would learn of their final selection to a Service.
47. Both these factors lead to a lot cf anxiety in the minds of trainses during the course of the training/evaluation period of 24 months at the ENA. CI healthy spirit of competition is OvQrrlQen by the ‘kill factor’ with each aspirant trying for top positions in the merit lie..
46. The advantages and disadvantages of the French System ot recruitment ts tho higher Civil SerViCeS have been out!ined above. Transplantation ot a s?stem Cannot be envisaged without analysing the extraneous factors which go :a create the environment within which the system functions. The French have a homogenous lanqua9e and culture which lead themselves well to a unitorm rec-ui tment. examinatron. training and evaluation procedure. ideal for their civil services. Furthermore, their recruitment needs are restricted to about 80 persons each year.
49. In India, the recruitment ba%e comprise% about l,@.@ aspirants fron, diverse socio-cultural and linguistic
backgrounds. .Of these, only about 700 to 800 are tinally selected every year tor the various services.. A comaton Training and evaluation tor the 700-800 candidate8 for a duration ot 24 months as in the French System could creato enormous administrative problems.
WPENDIX -V1.1 EXMIINATION FOR EXTERNAL CANOIDATLS
:Candidates must be less than 23 years ot age on the 1st day of Januacy in the ‘ year of the e::amination. In 1987 F. 88. this-limit was extended to 27 years.
Educ&tlon&l : A recognised University deqree’degrec
Oualltications from an institute. of Po1itic;rl Sciences / completion of first year of master (Higher) level studies in. law OF Economics. :In excptional cases. even if a candidat$’doeo not have any of the
above t-equisite educatisna1 qualifications, he can represent betore A commission established for this purpose end if found suitable. he too can tab e the entrance examination 1.
The educstional Qualifications of each of the crndidetes are e::amined by a Commission constitLlted by the Bureau of Public Administration comprising a President from the Council of States or the Court of Public Accounts 1 end 4 members, of whom 1 member must be a university professor. The members of the commission enJoy a 5 years term . The subJects for the tests are as follows:
-624-Wtittm fmt8 Duration
1.
Essay 4 hours

2.
Note writing 5 hour (based on a given dossier)

z. ESSAY 4 hours
4.
ESSAY J hours

5.
ESSLIV 4 hours

..
6. OPTIONAL ESSCIY 4 hours
BuLJactm Co-at ticlmt
a) PUBLIC LWoR
3

b) ECO"lV
a) LEO% WLYSIS
3
if (a) chosen for
1 above

OR
b) ECO"lICS/
aUCINT ITAl.IM:
TECHNIWES

if(b) chosen for above
a) ECONWYOR 4
b) PUBLIC LW
(the SUbJeCt not
chosen for test
1 above 1.

On the political 9
economic,social.
evolution of the
world and the ~VOlutiOn
of political thought
from the 10th century
to the present day.

a) PUBLIC FINANCE
OR

b) INTERNATIONCV CIFFAIRS

OR
C) SOCIAL ISSUES
bu6ineSS Lam 2 Civil Lam (onlyEconomic Geography those or Contemporary points History OR which Political Science 6 are Public Administration above
ORSoc1o1ogyOR the Accountancy averageFinancial Management points
ORDemographyOR are MathenatlcIOR counted1 St.tlStiCS.
Oral T0.t /tntorvi.m

Oral T0.t. Duration Bublrct Co-etticient
1.     Z Oral Tests 30 minutes a) Public Finance 3 for OR each b) International interview Affairs OR
c)     Social Issues (The 2 subjects
not selected tor 
the written 
exam.  no 3 1 
3. ForeignLanguage 1est  30 Minrl.tes  Russian/I tali+n/ Spanish/Chinese/Englash/German  7. 
f.  PersonalityTest  43 Minutes  Assessment of Personality b motivation of  the the the  3 
candidate 
T@t of Fhysical : yxlurance-runn ing/ Long-Jump/HiPh-JumpI Swimming. 
5. Gotiona!  20 YinL*tes  Electronic Data  1 
Orei Test  Processing  (only cointr which are tm’ 
average aoints are conrxlered1. 

APPENDIX-v1.z EXMIINATION FOR TW INTERNAL CCINDfDATES
Candldates must be less than 32 years of age on the first day of January in the year ot the examination. In 1-7-88 this limit uas extended to 56 years.
Ottior I By the 31st December of that same year
ow1i icatlons of ecrmination, the candidates should have completed at least 5 years of effective service as a functionary or
,.
as an aqent of the State(Perrod spent in traiAinp or in a training institute/ establishment tor entry to public service is not to be countee). Compu 1ssry national service/krmy s@rvite can, however, be counted.
The National Bureau of Ctdminictration eccept8/announces the names of the candidates oermitted to take the entrance examination for the EN&. The subjects tor the entrance test are as follows t
WrittUl Tests
The same as tor the external candidates. with the came coefficient, accept for the Test No. 4 which in the case ot the internal candidates is r
Dur&ti- Bubjmctm  Cwtticimt 
Note (based on dossier  5 hours  Political, econmlc and social development in the contemporary  4 
era. 

orai Testa/ rntervimwm

While the external candidates give an oral eezmination in a foreign language, the internal candidates have to tahe a written 2 hours test, which carries a co-efficient of 5.
All the other oral tests and interview are identical to those for external aspirants to the ENC\.
PREPARATORY CWRBE
Functionari~s/agentr of the State who have put in at l@ast S years ot service can tahe an admission test tor admission tc a preparatory course which is conducted for such internal candldstes, by the EN6 itself. to prepare them for the entrance eramination. This preparatory course is run in a university or in public establishments created / existing for this purpose.
Candidates seeking admission to the preparatory
course are placed in 2 categories:

A B Tkou with univmr8ity Thou without a univmr8ity
dogroo dogroo Age requirement a Candidates Age rmuirement8 Less than should be lass than 51 years 30 years on 1st January ot Of age as On 1st Janud; Of the year in which he takes
the year in which he takes the examination for entry
the examination ?or entry to to the preparatory course.
the preparatory course.
Duration of courae: 1 or 2 Duration of course: 2 or 3 Years depending on the age years depending on the 19s cf the candidate. of the candidate.
.*
ENT-EXMINATION FORPREemntmY COIRBE
Duration  Bublmct8  coetticiont 
1. Note or ( Based  Precis on a  4 hwrs  on any subject ot public/administretive  2 
given dossier)  interest 
3 hours  Current political, economic, social issues  2 

OR     international atfairs
S.     Interview to assess the professional expertise 3 gained by candidates in their work experience
Each candidate has 3 attempts for passing the entrance examination ?or access to preparatory course. The number of students tinally chosen each year is between 3 to 6 times the number of v8cancies which are likely to arise in the year in which the 8efected candidates will take the entrance examination for the EM. The students at
the preparatory course, remain functionaries of the
State. They continue to receive the salaries and are
treated as trainees +or the entrance examination for the
EN&, regardless of whether they are permanent or
temporary employees of the Government.
The only condition that they have to fulfil is to take the entrance examinatioc to the EN& at the end of the preparatory c%wse. 2 Jitriee/panels of selectors arc set UP for the selection of the entrants to the preparatory course. Their composition is as follows:
PRESIDENT

Jury tor Oraduate CandlJatea Jury tor Non-graduate candidates 3 bureaucrats 3 bureaucrats
I. ceucationists     ‘I. educationists
of which atleast One University Professor One High School Teacher
Z     persons selected from a panel 5 persons out up by Trade Unions1 Syndicates.
The National Bureau of Public Administration announces before the 15th October,the schedule for examination to be conducted in the following year. Two Juries of examinero/relectoro are also announced by the Minister ior Public CMministration, based on advice rendered to him by the Director of the EHA. The composition ot the Jury, one each for the internal Md the external examination is as follows t-
Jury tor Ewternal Candibatms Jury tor Internal Candieatom
1 President 
1Q Mccrber%  10 tlembers 
+ 2 Members who are common 
to both juries 
(Bureaucrats.  prafessor8,other  non  bureaucratic 

personages, of whom at least 3 must be bureaucrats an.d a maximum of 7 must be non bureaucrats).
In case votes 8ra ~qually divided , the President has the preponderant casting vote.
While announcing the Presidmt and the 2 Juries. an alternative President is also idmtified in case the former is unable, ?or whatever reasons, to pertorm him dutin.
Specialist examiners can also kappointed by the Bureau of Public Administrotion.
Examiners are appointed by the Bureau of Public Administration to participate along with the members of the Jury, in the correction of the answer papers. They even have a consultative role to play in the drliberstions of the juries.
Each written test is anonymous and is marl:ed by two examiner% of which atleast one must be a member oi the Jury. except in the case of the 6th optional writteh test for both the .interor1 and external examinations and
t
for the written !ihnguage test for the internal . Candidates. In any case. in the 4th written test Ln both cases the papers are corrected by two members of th@ jury.
The oral tests/Intczrviews/langue9e tests are assessed as follows :
-Oral language test for t aSSCS6ed by 2 SpeCialiSt
external candidates examiners

-Personality test for both t evaluated by the Presidmp external & internal and 4 atembers of the Jury candidate-
-Other interviews a 1 Specialist Examiner
? member of the Jury.

StLttlStSt *
I.     Sh. P. Chidombaram, minister of.State for.Personne1 and Training, Government of India
2.    
Or. P.C. Alexender, Governor, Tamil Nadu

3.    
Smt. Kumud Ben Joshi, Governor, Clndhra Pradesh

4.    
Prof. S. Nurul Hasan, Governor, Wcst Bengal

5.    
Sh. R.K. Trivedi, Governor, Gujarat

4.     Smt. Ram Dulari Sinha, Governor, Kerala
7.    
8h. Mohammed Usman Ari f ,
Governor, Uttar Prade8h

8.    
Sh. N.T. Rama Rao
Chief minister, CIndhre ?fadesk

9.    
Sh. Jyoti Basu,
Chief Minister, West Bang01

10.    
Sh. R.K. Jaichendrr Singh,
Chief Minister, Hanipur

11.    
Sh. P.K. nrhanta,
Chief minister, A6SaMI

12.    
Sh. E.K. Nayanar,
Chief minister, Kerrla

13.    
sh. s.a. ~ohmai,
Chief Minister, Urnmataka

14.    
Sh. Amar Sinh Chaudhry,
Chief Minister. Gujarat

15.    
Sh. Narayan Outt Tiwri,
Chief Minister, Uttrr Pradesh

Indian Foreign Sorvicm

1.
Shri K.P.S. Menon,     Foreign Secretary

2.    
Shri P.L. Sinai, Special Secretary, Ministry of External Llffairs

3.    
Shri W.S. Rathore; Joint Secretary, Ministry of External Affairs

4.    
Shri Anil Wadhwa, Deputy Secretary. Ministry of
External Affairs

Indian Police Smrvice, DLINI Civil Servicer DAN1 Police
Smrvicm

Shri J.A. Kalyan Krishnan, Home Secretary

Indian Detencm Eat&te Smrvicm, Indian Detence Accounta Serviemr Armod Forcma Hqra. Civil Service Oroup ‘8’
Shri T.N. Seshan. Defence Secretary
Indian Revmnue Service (Income Tam)
1. Dr. K.C.. Sengupta, Revenue Secretary

-. Shri. G.N. Gupta. Chairman. CPDT
Z.     Shri h..J. keddy, Additional Secretary, Department of Revenue
4.     Shri. T.V. Nayar. Joint Secretary, Department of RQVMU.
Indian Revenue Service (katona C Central Exciae) and Cumtom a Appraiw Smrvicm** Oroup ‘8’
1.
Dr. N.K. Sengupta, Revenue Secretary

2.
‘ Shri S. Venkatarama Iyer, fleabet ,CBEC

3.
Shri T.V. Nayar, Joint Secretary, Department of Revenu

Indian Railway Trattic Service, Indian Railway Accounts Smrvicm, Indian Railway Personnml Smrvice and Pomt of Am8t. Security Ofticar, RPF
1.    
Shri K.V. Krishna Murthy, Member (Staff).Rallway Board and E)&Officlo Secretary, 001, Ministry ot. Railways

2.    
Shci Vinod Pal, Adviser -nanbpement Services, Railway’ Board

Indian Audit & ficcounts Servicm
1.    
Shri M.M.B. Annavi, Additional Deputy Comptroller C Auditor General

2.    
Ms. ReC.ha Gupta, 6sstt. Comptroller & Auditor General.

Indian Detence Accounts Imrvice
Shri. V.S. Jafa,     Secretary & Financial Adviser, Minist* of Defence
Indian Ordnance Factoriem Service Shri P.C. Jain, Secretary, Defence Production
Indian Defence Estate Slrvicm
Shri. K.M. Sebastian,     Director General, Defence Estates
Post OC Ammi8tant Commandant in CIff Shri. G.S. Mander, Director Oenera1,CISF
Indian Po8t.l Service
1.    
Shri. F.S. Ragavachari, Secretary, Department of Ports

2.    
Shri S. Chadha, Director (Staff), Department of P06tS

Indian P I T Accounts and Flnancm emrvico
Shri Satya Pal, Secretary, Department
of Telecommunication

Indian Civil Accounts 8.rvico

Shri-S.R. Singh,     Additional Secretary, Department
of Expenditure

Indian Intormation 8.rviem

Shri F. flurnri,     Secretary, Ministry of Information end Broadcastrng
Cmntral Trade Serviem

1′. Shri Surinder Sinph. Special Secretary, Ministry
of Commerce

2.     Shri M.C.Jayaraman. Joint Secretary, ministry of Commerce
Central Smcretarlbt     Servicm, Oroup ‘8’.
Shri 0.F. Gupta.     Joint Secretary. Department of Personnel and Training
DANI Clvll Servlco,     DANI Polleo tmrvice

Shri V.P.Skrivastav,     4dditional Secretary,
Ministry of Home fitfairs

vrrnmnt OttLurr.

Tamil Nadu

1.
Sh. C.V. Ramakrirhna,     4dvisor to Govrrnrr

2.
Sh. M.M. Hajendran, Chief Secretary

3.    
Sh. Hari Phaohar. Agriculture Production Commirsioncr

4.
Sh. Nambrar     Home Secretary

3. Sh. T.R. Ghankar, Secretary , Industry
6.
Sh. Radha Krimhnan, Inspector General of Police

7.
Smt. Laxmi Pranesh, Secretary, Personnel

hndhra Prademh
1.
.Sh. G.R. Nair. Chief Secretary

2.    
Sh. P.Y. Dorai Swany, Principal Secretary, Education

3.
Sh. C.R. Eamalanathan, Secretary (GCID)

4.    
Prof. J.Satyanarayana, Vice-Chairman, &P. State Council of HiQher Education

5.
Sh. Ram nohan Rao, D.G.     Police

6.
Sh. Frabhakw Rao, I.G.     Polio

W0.t emg.1
1.
Sh. Rathin Sengupta, Chief-Secretary

2.
Sh. c\. PlaJctmdar, Secretary     (Personnel)

3.
Sh. T.C. Dutt, Secretary (Health)

4.
Sh. P.K. Sarkar. Secretary     ( Industry)

3. Sh. b.1. bSu, DAractor General Of POlACC
6. Sh. S. hrlshnamurthy. Secretary (Home)
Orimu (Meeting at Calcutta)
1. Sh. P.C. Ratho, Director General of Police
hnipur
1.
Sh. B.R. Basu, Chief Secretary

2.
Sh. G.S. Pandher, Director     General of Police

hS8U
1.
Sh. S.D. Phene. Chief Secretary

2.
Sh. Bhaokar Barua, Secretar.y to Ooverrhnsat

3.    
Sh. Tarun Krishna Karnila, Secretary to Government

4.    
Sh. Subrahmanyam, Director Oeneral ot Police

3.     Sh. Sagar, 1.0. of Police

6.     Sh. Bczbaruah, Conmis8ioner (Home b Industries)
N&qa1and
1.    
Sh. Binod Xumar ,Commirsionefl* (Home)

2.    
Sh. P.Y. Zutshi, Director General of Folicc

5.     Sh. L.Colney, Development Commissioner
4.    
Sot. €mi Merry, Cldditional Secretary (Power)

5.    
Sh. Binchilo Thong. Assistant Commissioner

Mmqh@laya

1.    
Sh. V. ksmakrishnan. Chief Secretary

2.    
Sn. N.N. Mukher~Qe, Commrrsioner 6 Secretary(Finance1

3.    
Sh. R.V. Pillai, Development Commis8ioncr

4.    
Sh. J.R. Phira. Commissioner (Home)

3.     Sh. C.@. Tripathy, Commissioner (Education)

6.    
Sh. W.H.S. Pariat. Secretary (Personnel)

7.    
Sh. S.E. Jha. 1.0. Police

8.    
Sh. L. Sailor Deputy I.G. Cum Commandant Gcnl.. Home Guards

9.    
Sh. W.R. nar Paniang, SSP, E.K. Hills. Shillong

10.    
Sh. L.C. Reddy, DIG, Heghrlaya. Shillong

11.    
Sh. S.R. Shangpliang, DIG, Special Branch, Shillong

8ujwat
1.
Sh. H.R. Fatankar, Chiet Secretary

2.    
Sh. B.T. Trivedi. Commissioner Settlement

3.
Sh. R. Balakrishnan, Additional Chief Secretary (Home)

4.    
Sh. V: Kri8hnam~rthy, CWbitional Chief Secretary (Urban Development)

3.     Sh. Vinay Sharma, Additional Chiet Secretary,Mines, lndustry C Energy
6.
Sh. S.L. Varma. Secretary GAD 81 Personnel

7.
Sh. Plan Mohan SinQh, D.G. police

8.    
Sh. C.B. Giridhar, Secretary to Government, Rural Deve1opmen t

9.
Sh. M.N. Vaishnar, Chief Conservator of Forests

10.    
Sh. Niranian Singh, Secretary. Panchayat & Rural Housing Departatent

Kerala
1.
Sh. S. Narayanasuamy, Chief Secretary

2.
Sh. M.S.k. Ramawamy, Nciculture Prodcuction Commissioner

3.
Sh. M. Mohanhumar, Commissioner 81 Secretary, Hooe

4.
Sh. A.V.Venbatachalam, Chairman C Planaging Director, The Travancore Titanium Products Limited

5.    
Sh. Ir. John Mathai. Chairman 81 Managing Director, Lerala State Industries Development Corporation Ltd.

6.
Sh. Ra~qopal Narayan, Director General of Police

7.
Sh. F. Qopinathan Naif, Director of VigilanceInvestigation

8.
Sh. PI. Sivrsjan, Principal Chief Conservator of Forest

Kamataka

1.
Sh. A.B. Datar, Chief Secretary

2.
Sh. K.S.N. Murthy, Additional Chief Secretary

3.
:Sh. C. Noronha, Secretary (Home)

4.
Sh. A.R. Nizamuddin, Director-General of Police

5.
Sh. Y.U. 811. Krishna Rau. DGP 6 Commandant, Home

Guards

I. Sh. A.R. Sridharan,     D.G.. Crimes C Training
7.
fh. Chandu Lal, IGP     (Admn.)

8.
Sh. G.V. Viswanath,     DO, KSWE

9.
Sh. Zafar Saifullah, Development Commissioner

10.    
Sh. M. SanLara Narayanan, Additional Chief Secretary C Planning Commiscioner

Uttar Prademh

1. Sh. Shi ramani Sharma, Chief Secretary
L.


Sh. S.N. Acharya, Chairman. Board of Revenue
3.     Sh. R.V. Bhargava, Agriculture Production
Commissioner

.*
4.     Sh. R.P. Dar, Principal Secretary. Hi11 Development
3. Sh. F.C. Sharma. Secretary (Education)
6.
Sh. Sant turner Trivathy, Secretary (Home)

7.
Sh. GopaiOar, Mehrotra. Secretary to Chief Wir.ister

0. Sh. P.N. Tewari. Secretary (Planning)
9.
Sh. Ramesh Chandra, Secretary (Irrigation)

10.
sl-.. Priiesh Cumar, Secretary (Tech. Education)

11.    
Sh. Mubul Sanwal, Director. U.P. Clcademy of Admin1stration

12.
Sh. Siddarth Behura, Secretary (Personnel)

13.
Sh. M. Badhwani, Chairman, Vigilance Commission

14.    
Sh. S.%.’fl. Tripathi, Inspector General of Police (Personnel)

13.     Sh. Y.N. Saxena, Inspector General of Yolice (Training)
16.  Sh.  Pankaj Agrawal,  Staff  Officer to Chief 
Secretary 
17.  Sh.  R.K.  Kunwar,  Joint Secretary  (Personnel) 

Tamil Nadu

1.

c1

L.
3.
4.

9.
6.

7.

8.
9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

Madras University Prof. K. Radha Shanaugasundaram,Department of
Biochemistry Dr. S. Seetha, Departmeflt of Music Dr. B. Rukmangada Reddi, Head of Department of
Applied Geology Prof. K. Rajagopalan, Department of Organic
Chemistry Dr. V. Devanathan, Department .of Nuclear Physics Dr. N. Radhakrishnan, Department of Legal Studies Dr. P.M Gopinath, Department of denetics Dr. P. Oovindarajulu, Department of Endocrinology,
PGIBMS
Dr. S. AnandKumar, Department of Micro-Biology,
PGIAMS
Dr. Fon Kothandaranman, Department of Tamil

Literature Dr. D. Sundaram, Department of Sociology Dr. R. Muthusamy, Department of Anatomy, Dr. ALM
PGIEMS
Dr. K.Chockalingam, Head, Department of Criminology Dr. S.N. Ganesan, Department of Hindi Dr. K.M. Prabakara Variar, Department of Malayalam Dr. V. Ramachandran, Department of Telugu
17.

18.

19.

20.

21.

22.

2′:.

24.
2s.
26.

27.

29.
29.
5.1.

3.2.

34.

35.

36.

37.

38.

Dr. P. Anantha Krishnan, Professor of Psychology (Head)
Dr. M.S. Nagarajan, Head of the Department of English Dr. C.E. Ramachandran, Prof. of History (Head) Dr. H. Kothandaraman, Professor of Polymer Science Dr. C. Palasubramanian, Department of Tamil Lang}qage Dr. K.C.. Rajasekaran. Department of Geology Dr. P.S. balasubramania.n, Department of Education Dr. A.M. Nallagounden, Department of Econometrics Dr. H. Thandavan, Department of Anna Studies Dr. K.C. Manoharan,Department of Defence Studies Dr. T. Balakrishnan,Department of Physical Chemistry Dr. 6. Dupairaj ,Department of Zoology
Dr. M. r+aganathan,Department of Economics Dr. K.N. Ponnuswamy.Department of Statistics
Pr. R. Srinivasan,Department of Fiophycics
Dr.b: .S.Padmanabhan, Director, Ramanujan Institute for Advanced Strrdy in Mat hema ti c5
Mrs. G. Hajamani~kam,Principal, Quaid-€-Mil let

College for Women,  Madras 
Sri  K.L.  Nagarajan,Principal*  D.G.  Vaishnav 
College, Madras 
Dr.  Sr.  Helen Vincent,  Principal, Stella, Maris 

College, Madras

Dr. flrs.Yasodha Shanmugasundaram, Principal,
Ethiraj
College, Madras

Dr. S.Augustine Chellappa, Principal, Sir
Theagaraya College,
Madras

Dr. E. Ilamathian, Tamilnadu Institute of Labour
Studies, Madras

54-Dr. S. Savithiri,     Professor of Industrial Psychology, Tamil Nadu Instit’ute of Labour Studies,
Madras
40.
Dr. P.0. Mohanra~an, Librarian

41.    
Dr. 63. Mahadevan, Dlrector. Centre for FIdvanced Study in Botany

42.    
Mrs. Susila Marlappan, Secretary, Unlverelt)! Students FIdvisory Bur6au

43.    
Dr. F.S. Subramanian, Director of Collegiate Education, Madras

44.    
Dr. N. Viswanathan, Princlpal, S.I.V.E.T. College. Gowrivakl. am, Madras

45.    
Dr. r?. Shanmugham. Director. Institute of Corre5pon d ance Educat1on

Indian Institiite of Technoloqr.     rladras
t
Dr. L;S. Srineth. Director
and
Senio-Frofessors of IIT.     madras
Flndhra Pradmsh
Dsmanie University
1. Prof. Nawneeth Hao.     Vice-Chancellor
L.
-. Frof. V.L’. Subba Rao. Prlnclpal. Englneering
College


Justice Sri Sardar Ali Khan. Dean, Law Faculty
4.
Frof. M. Yadava Reddy, Dean, Social Sciences

5.    
Frof. ,C.H. Raghu Ram. Dlrector. 0cademlc Staff Go1 lege

6.    
Frof. F. Narasimha Reddy, I/t Registrar 81 Director Academic Oudit Cell

7.    
Frof. P. Ramachander Rao. Principal, Science College

6. Dr. F.S. Rao, Dean., Faculty of Medicine
9.    
Frof. E.G. Parameswaran, Principal, Commerce College

10.    
Frof. V. Kannan, Dean, School of Maths & Comp. Sciences

11.
Frof-. K. Subba Rao, Dean, School of Life Sciences

12.    
Prof. R U.R. Chandrashekhar Hao, Deptt. of Pol. Science

1s. Prof. S. Viswanathan, Dean. School of Humanities

14.
Prof. 6. Mehta. Dean of Chemistry Department

15.
Frof. S. NagaraJdn

16.
Dr. F. Murali krishna. Acting Registrar

17.
Prof. G.S. Aurora, Dean of Social Sciences

18.
Frof. R. Jaganathan. Dean of Chemistry

HYderi! bad Unive rs it!f
1. Prof. H.H. Krishna Murthy , Vice Chanceller
Kakativa University
1. Frof. Jafar Nizam, Vice-Chancellor

Andhra Fradesh Open University

1. Frof. C. Narayana Heddy. Vice-chancellor

West Bcngal

Gal tutta University
1.
Dr. B. Roy Choudhury, Vice-chancellor

2.    
Dr. N.G.Choudhury, Director, Indian Institute of Social Welfare and Business Management

3.
Dr. T.K. Mukherji, Registar

4.    
Dr. 5. Rai Choudhurr, Principal. FresldencyCollege

5.
Dr. S. Choudhury, Principal, NRS Medical College

6.    
Prof. D.K. Sinha, Pro Vice-Chancelldr (Business Affairs P Finance)

7.    
Prof. A.N. Dave, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering 81 Technology

8.
PFof. 6.K:. Chandi, Dean Faculty of Medicine

9.    
Prof. 8. Sen, Principal, Bengal Engineering
college

JadavDur University

1. DF. Shanker Sen, Vice-Chancellor

Indian Inst itute of Manaoement. Calr ut-

1. Prof. R.F. Iyer, Director
2. Prof. Lahiri
3.
Prof. Ghose

4.
Prof. Mathur

5.
Prof. Rose

Orissa (Meeting at Calcutta)
Utkal University

1. Sh. P.S. Habib Mohammed, Vice-Chancellor
Delhi
pelhi University

1.
Prof. Abad Ahmed, Direct- South Campus

2.
Prof. FInima Sen, Department of Psycholcgy

3.    
Dr. N.K. Uberoi, Director, Centre for Professional Develipment and Higher Education

4.    
Prof. S.P. Aggarwal, Dean, Faculty of Mathematics! Sciences

5.
Prof. D.S. Aggarwal, Deal, Faculty of Arts

6.
Frof. R.B. Jain, Dean, SocMI Science

7.
Frof. 0.F. Grover, Dean, Technology

8.    
Prof. K.N. Sharma, Principal, University College of Medical Sciences

9.
Prof. C.L. Talesara, Dean, Faculty of Science

10. Frof. C.P. Tharur. Faculty of Management Studies

11.
Ur. Mohamowd Amin. Frincipal, St. Stephens College

12.
Frof. N.V. Kay, Head of Chemistry Departmerit

Jawahar La1 Nehru University
1. Frof. M.S. Agwani, Vice-Chancellor

A.     Dr. P.A. Narasimha Murthy, Dean, School of International Studies
-T
.-.. Dr. V. Subramanian,     Professor SEI
4. Dr. R.S. Fagga
9. DI-. S. bhattacharya
6.
PI-. 6.K. Mathur. Centre for     Fiegicnfil Development

7.
DI-. J. Subba B~G.School of Environment Sci.ences.

8.
Dr. M.S. Rajan. School of International Studies

9.
Dr . J . Mandal .. Finance Officer

10.    
Ur. R.C.. Jain. Centre for the Study of Social Systems

11.
Dr. F.N. Sharma, Cwrdinatcrr, Evaluation

12.
Dt-.(Mrs) S. Chandra, CIL, School of Languages

13.
nr. Karmeshu, SCSS

14.
Dr. N.P. Mukherjee,     SCSS

15.
Dr. 3 .N. Lapur, SCSS

16.
Dr. C.unal P. Roy,     Centre for Bio-Technology

17.
Dr. (Ms) Devaki Phama, Centre for Pio-Teckialogy

t.bsam
Quwahati University

.I. Prof. Pabitra Kumar Sarme, Head of Department of Chemistry
2.. Dr. Kunja Medhi, Reader in Political Science

3.
Prof. Subhas C Dey, Head o? Department of Zoology

4.    
Frof. A.C. Bhagbati, Head of Deptt. of
Ant hropo 1ogy

9.     Sh. R. Phattacharjee, Dy. Director, Pre-Examination Trainlng Centre
6. Prof. Mohammed Jaher. Head of Deptt. of Geography
Nag. 1and North Eastern Hill University
I. Sh. Kirenwati, Pro VicerChancellor
2. Dr. K.K. Sharma, Professor of Education
Oriasa

1.
Prof. Saroj Wishra, Deptt. of Psychology

2.
Dr. F.H. Peo, Professor of Physics

3.
Prof. S. Nanda, Deptt. of Psychology

4.
Prof. S. R.ath, Deptt.     of Pol.Scienca

5.
Prof. Garg, Department of Law

6.
Dr. Sipish Pattnaik, Deptt. of Economics

7.
Dr. Jena, Department of Commerce

8.
Dr. J. Sarangi, Department of Statistics

9.
Prof. Srivastav, Deptt. of Sociology

10.
Prof. Kumar, Deptt. of Labour Welfare

Gujarat llniversitv

1.    
Dr. Dhawal Mehta, Director, R.K. School of Business Management

2.
Dr. CImbu Phai Desai,     Pro Vice-Chancellor

3.  Dr.  Vimal  F Shah,  Frof.  L Head of  Deptt.  of 
Sociology . 
4.  Dr.  C.H. Thaker, Reader in Economic 
5.  5r‘.  M.V.  Dasu,  Lecturer in Psychclogy 
6.  Dr.  K.R.  Joshi, Registrar 
7.  Dr.  D.F. Chhyaya, Controller of Examination 
8.  Dt-.  F.K. Mehta, Regional Director, Open University  Indira Gan dhi 

Guiarat Vidvaoeeth

1. Prof. F.am:al Carib h. Pice-Chancel lor

Dr. Vinod 6’. Trlpathi. Firgistrar

6.

-Indian Inztitute of Planaaeinent. Ahmedabad
1.
Frot. N. Sheth. Director

2.
Frof. J.r.. Setia. Professor and Dean

7.     Prof. J.L. Siha. Chairman Fidmiesion and Financial CommJ ttee
4. Prof. V.H. Gaikv+ad
5.
Prof. Amul Bhatt

6.
Prof. V. Raghunathan

Karala
Kerala University

1.
Dr. G.E. Thampi, Vice-chancellor

2.
Dr. A. Sukumaran Nair, Pro Vice-Chancellor

Dr. K.M. Alexander, Prof &     Head, Deptt. of Zoology
3.

4.    
Dr. P.R. Gopinathan Nsir, Faculty of Social Sciences

5.    
Dr. K.S.S. Nambooripad, Professor and Head, Department of Mathematics

6.    
Dr. K.S.Viswonathan, Professor and Head, Department of Physics

7.    
Dr. C.A. Ninan, Professor & Head, Department of Potany

8.    
Dr. C.G. Hamanchandran Nair, Frofe%sor of Chemistry and Dean Faculty of Science

9.    
Dr. C.N. Furshothaman Nair, Professor and Dean, Department of Commerce

lC1.     Dr. K. Devadasan, Professor and Head, Department of Psycho1ogy
11.     Dr. F.I.A. karim, Director, College Development Counci1
Karnataka panaalore University
1.
Prof. D.M. Nanjun Dappa,     Vice-Chancellor

2.
Prof. V.P. Continho,     Dean, Faculty of Law

3.
Prof. K. Hanumanthappa, Dean,     Faculty ot Commerce

4.
Prof. M. Sivakumara Swamy, Dean, Faculty of Arts

5.
Prof. N.G. Futta Swamy, Dean Faculty of Science

Jndian Institute of Science, Pangalore
I. Prof. R.S.N. Rau,     Dean of Engineering
2.    
Prof. N.5.L. Rao, Professor, Department of Civil Engineering

3.
Prof. M.4. Viswamitra, Dean     of Science

Indian Znstitute of Manaaement. Fianaalorg
1.
F’rof. J. Philip? Director

2.
Dr. Indira Hajaraman, Profesqor of Economics

5. Prof. S.P. Clcharya, Department of Industry
4.
Dr. Prasanna Chancira,. Professor of Finance

5.    
Dr. H.N. Haldipur, Professor of Public Admin is t ration

5.     3r.ShanCar Narayan, Professor of Education Management
7.    
Dr. S. Shivaramu, Professor of Internationa: Business

8.
Dr. H.K. .Hrrlek.ar, Professor of Quantitative

Methods and Compu tar
Information System

Psore University
1.

3

L.

4.

5.

6.

7.

E.
9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

…’
Uttar Pradesh

I ucknow University

1.
Dr. S.P. Nagendra, Vice-chancellor

2.    
Dr. F.K. Khanna, Principal, King George Medical College

3.    
Dr. D.P. Singh, Director, Institute of Public
hdministration

4.
Prof. D.D. Sharma, Head, Department of English

5.
Dr. V.D. Gupta. F’rofessor, Department of Fhyslcs

6.    
Dr. L.D. Thankur, Professor and Head, Department of
Political Science

7.
Dr. B.N. Puri, Ketd. Professor of Ancient History

8.
Dr. G.S. Misra, Ketd. Professor of Western History

sS23. Pant Institute of Social Sciences. A1 lahabad
(Meetirrg of Lucknow)

1. Dr. A.D. Pant, Director

V.     Senior Officers of Central Qroup ’61’ Services, posted in States
Went Bengal

1.
Sh. S.T. henge. Principal Accountant General

2.    
Sh. S.K. Gangopadhya., Chief Commissioner of Income Tax

Buj arat

1.
Sh. N.P. Fhatta, Chief Commissioner of Income Tax

2.    
Sh. Mathur, Collector of Customs and Central
Excise

3.
Sh. D.S. Sakalk.ale, Post Master General

4.
Sh. P.K. Lahiri, Accountant General

Kerala

I. Sh.~ R. Hariharan, Clccoutant General ( ALE)
2.
Sh. Ananda Shankar, Accoutant General (Audit)

3.
Sh. M.K. Kesavan, Commissioher, Income Tax

4.
Sh. C.J. Mathew, Post Master General

5.
Sh. D. Parthasarathy, Additional Post Master General

6.
Sh. U.V. Naik, General Manager, Telecommunications

7.
Sh. C. KarunaRaran, General Manager, ( Development),elecommunications

8.
Sh. Ir:. KAnhikrishnan, Director, Dwrdarshan Kendra

Karnataka

1.    
Sh. T.5. Sridharan, General Manager (Dev.),Banoalore Telephones

2.    
Sh. G.S.S. Murthy, General’ Managerr FangaloreTelephones

3.    
Sh. M.N. Mathur, Chief Genl. Manager, Te1ecommunicatlons

4.
Sh. S.M. Chickermane, Commissioner of Income Tax

5.
M5. A.L. Ganapathi, Accountant General (FIG-11)

6.
Fh. R.S.A. Rao, Accountant General (Cl?4E)

7.
Sh. S.V. Unnitrishnan,Accountant General.(FIUDIT-I) 8′. Sh. R. Sundareshan, Pivisional Railway Manager

9.     Dr. (Smt) Jyotsna K. Kamat, Directbr, All India Radio
Uttar Pradesh

1.
Sh. V.D. Chadha, Divisiohal Railway Manager

2.    
Sh. Amar SinQh, Additional Divisional Railway . Manager

3.
Sh. S.P. Rai, Chief Post Piaster General

4.
Sh. S.B, Fillay, Senior Deputy Accow-tant General

Tamil Nadu Public Service Commission
1.
Sh. Laxmi Narayanan, Chairman

2.
Sh. U.S. Natarajan , Member

3.
Sh. P.L. Funnu Swamy, Member

Andhra Prsdemh.Public Service Commission
1.
Prof. V. Ramakistayya, Chairman

2.
Sh. K.. Satyanarayana, Member

3.
Sh. R. Sreekanth Reddy. Member

West Bengal Public Service Commimsion
1.
Sh. S.UK DWS, Chzxrrnan

2.
Dr. (Smt, Hela Ghosh. Member

T
a. Pr. Ganguly, Member
4. Dr. M.N. 611. Member
3. 5h. S.h. Chak.ravorty, Member
6. Dr. S.C. Lahrri, Member
Pleghalaya Public Scrvicr Cornmission
1.
5h. J.M. Jala, Chairman

2.
Sh. E.C. Sanqma, Member

Qujarat Public Service COlluniS8iOrl
1.
Dr. K.D. Vasava, Chairman

2.
Sh. M.V. Murkad, Member

3.
Sh. P.K. Gadhavi, Member

4.
Sh. V.T. Shah, Member

5.
Sh. M.V. Solanki, Member Uttar Prademh Elubordinato Brruice Board

1.  Sh.  A.G.  Dasr Chairman 
2:  Sh.  M.Y.  Quarrithi, Member’ 
3.  Sh.  R.N.  Sharma,  Member 

Clndhra Pradr8h
1.    
Smt. Lakshmi Parthasarathy Pasker, 11980) M.D., AFCO

2.
. MS. Svtirtha Phattacharya. Sub col-lector Bhadracha1am

3.
Sh. Ajay Misra. Sub Collector,     District Warangal

4.
Sh. 0.V. Sagar, P.D., ITDA

5.
Sh. Anurag Sharma.     S.P., Ranga Reddy

6.    
Sh. I.V. Subba Rac. (1979). Joint Secretary (Protoco1)GAD

7.    
SH. M. Nagarjuna, Additional Registrar of Cooperative Societie’s

8.
Sh. D.R. Garg, (1980) Joint Secretary (Finance)

9.
Dr. P. Mohopatra,     Commissioner, APVP

10.
Sh. M.G. Gopal, P.O. ITDA, Warangal

11.    
Smt. G. Latha Krishna Hao, Special Officer & CA, Urban Land Ceiling

12.
Sh. S. Chellappa, Collector     C District Magistrate

15.     Sh. S.N,Mohanty, Joint Secy. Transport, Road k–Building Deptt.
.14. Sh.

15. Sh.
16.
Sh.

17.
Sh.

18. Sh.
19. Sh.
20. Sh.
21.
Sh.

22.
Dr.

23.
Sh.

24. Sh.
25. Sh.
26. Dr.

L7. Sh.
LingaraJ Panigrahi,     Deputy Secretary, Women, Child Welfare L Labour Department
K.     Fradeep Chandra, Deputy Secretary, Education Department
N.R.
Wasan, OSD, Police Organisation K.Durga Prasad, Deputy Commissioner of Police Anurag Sharma, Superintendent of Police

R.
Subramanyan Jagdish Chandra Sarma

F.
Subramanyan

P.
Venkata Ramesh Pabu

D.
Sambosiv Rao Harieh Yumar

L.V. Subremanyan Prem Chand Phanbal Ram Meena
Wemt Bengal
1.  Sh.  Menoj tlalviya,  IPS  (’86 
2.  Sh.  SivaJi Ghosh,  IPS (’85) 
3.  Sh.  4.K.  Maliwal.  IPS (’83) 
4.  Sh.  Govinda Fhattacharjee.  AAS  (’86) 
5.  Sh.  Malay  Kumar Aiswas,  ICIAS  (’86) 
6.  Sh.  Nazrul  Islam,  IPS (81′) 
7.  Smt.  Anuradha Mookerjee,  IITS (’86) 
8.  Smt.  Shubba  Kumar,  ICIAS  (  851 
9.  Smt.  Sengeeta Gupta,  IITS  (‘P4) 
10.  Sh.  Mathrani  roy,  IAAS  (’83) 
11.  Sh. Rajnish Kumar,  IITS  (’82) 

12.
Sh. B.B. ManOcha, IAAB (‘813

13.
Sh. R.N. Jha, IITS (’83)

14. Sh P.K. Das, IITS (’83)
13. Sh. A. Purakayastha, 16s
16.
Sh. D. Sen, IAS

17.
Smt. Kumar, IAS 18* Smt. Chatterjee, IAS

19. Sh. Debasish Shome, Ipls
Manipur
1.
Sh. Harjit Singh Sandhu, IPS ( 831

2.
Sh. Saatosh Macherla, IPS (’84

3.
5h. P. Mallana Gond. IPS (’84)

4.
Sh. Shahid Ahmed, IPS (’78)

5.
Sh. T. Thang Thuam. IPS 79)

6.
Sh. Oinam Naba Kishore Singh, IAS (’84)

7.
Sh. P. Mohan Kumar, IAS (’81)

Assam
1.
Sh. K.D. Tripathy

2.
Sh. Ram Tirath Tindel

3.
Sh. V.K. Bhawra, IPS

4.
5h. rlunieh Johri

5.
Dr . A.K. Singh

4. Sh. D. Jhingran
7. Sh. K.K. Mittal
8. 5h. M.S. Rao
-636-

9.
Sh. J.C. Pegu, IITS

10.
Sh. M.S. Rao, IplS

11.
Sh..Munish Janhari, IAS

Nag. 1and
1.
Dr. L.V. Reay, IAS (’83)

2.
Sh. H.K. Khulu, IAS (’62)

3.
SH. Efinchko Thong. IAS

Me0ha1ya
1.
Sh. S.K. Jain, IF’S

2.
Sh. Raghvendra Awasthi, IPS

3.
Sh. R.K. Sharma, IF’S

Dmlhi
1.
Sh. D. B. Venkatesh Varma, IFS (’88J

2.
Ms. Nandhini lyer, IFS ( 84)

3.
Sh. M.S. Grover, IFS(’81

4.
Sh. Ranjit Rae, IFS (’80

J. Sh. Hamid plli Rao, IFS (‘ 81)
6.
Sh. Nikhil Seth, IFS (’80)

7.
sn. Rajiv Mishrs, IFS (’80)

8.
Sh. B.S. Rishnoi, IFS (’83)

9.
Sh. Pankaj Saran, IFS (’82) la. Sh. pl.R. Ohanashyam, IFS (’82)

11.
Sh. Sunil Kohli, IDAS (’81)

12.
Sh. Sh. Avinash Dikshit, IDCIS (’86)

13.

14.
15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

21.

22.

23;

24.

25.

26.

27.
28.

29.
30.

31.
.32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.

Sh. V.R. Sadasivam, IDRS (’82) M5. Madhulika Prasad, IDAS ( 82) Sh. T.S. Kripanidhi, IDAS. (’82) Sh. Sunil Kumar Sawhney, ICdcCES Ms. Malini Thadani,,IITS (.’80) Sh. Sanjay Patra, IITS Sh. Gopal Mukherjee, IITS Ms. Meenu Gopalakrishnan, ICkCES Sh. Anand Kishore, IITS (’82) Sh. krishna Saini, IITS'(’81) Sh. Rakesh Miara, ICkCES Sh. W.L. Wangshing, ICLCES Sh. Prabhat Kumar, ICkCES (’81) Pr. Pramod Laxman Banker, IRPS (‘811 Sh. Anil Kumar Gulsti, 1RPS (’83) Mr. Devik.a Chhikara, IRPS (’83) Ms. Urvilla Chhibbar. IRPS (’83) Mo. Ragini Yechury, IRPS (’81) Ms. Dakshita Das, IRAS (’84)
Ms. kmrita Dhjllon, IRAS (84)
M5. Saandhay Deep Das, IHAS (’81)
Sh. Hajiv Patt, IRAS (’80)
Sh. Devinder Rai, IRAS (’81)
Sh. Mani Anand, IRTS (’84)
Ms. Sunira Bassi, IRTS (’81)
Sh. C.S. Ray, RPF (’82)
Mrs. Jaya Varmah Hota, RPF (’85)
Ms. Rita’ Mitra, SAWS (‘Sii

41.  Sh.  Satish Loomba,  IAhAS  ’82) 
42.  Ms.  Hinakshi Chak,  IAlAS  ’81) 
43.  Sh.  H. Pradeep Rao,  IACAS (’81) 
44.  Sh.  R.K.  Ghose,  IALAS  (’82) 
45.  Sh.  Amitabh Mukhopadhyay,  IAhAS (  80) 
46.  Sh.  Suhas eshi,  ICAS  (’80) 
47.  Sh.  S.K. Mathur,  ICAS  (’85) 
48.  Sh.  G.R.C:.  Murthy  ICAS( ’84) 
49.  Ms.  Vandana Sharma,  ICAS  (’84) 
50.  Sh.  Chandy Flndrews,  ICAS  (’81) 
51.  Ms.  Anuradha  Mitra,  PLT A/cs  t Finance Service 
( ’82) 
52.  Sh.  S.S.  Faniwal,  PLT, Fl/cs.C Finance Service (‘841 
SZ.  Sh.  A.K.  Sharrna, ‘F’LT, Fl/cs L Finance Servi’ce (’80) 
54.  Sh.  Dilip Padhye,  PCT A/cs L Finance Service  (’86) 
5s.  Sh.  A.S.  Phola.  PtT A/cs  & Finance Service  (’80) 
56.  Sh. C.B. Sharma,  IOFS  (’82) 
57.  Sh.  A.K.  Nayak.,  IOFS (’89) 
58.  Sh.  A.M.  Shahryar,  IOFS (’84) 
59.  Sh.  K. Kt-ishna Moot-thy,  IOFS  (’80) 
60.  Smt.  Sujata Chaudhary,  Indian Postal Service  (’85) 
61.  Sh.  P.C.  Tanwar,  Indian Postal Service  (’84) 
62.  Sh.  O.S.  Veerawal,  Indian Postal Service  (’81) 
65.  Sh.  J.Parida,  Indian Postal Service  (’81) 
64.  Sh.  Jagdev Singh Mahi,  IDES  (  83) 
65.  Sh.  Sauvik  Majiimdar,  IDES  (’84) 
66.  Rs.  Deepa Bhallq,  IDES (  83) 
47.  Sh.  B.A.  Thayalan,  IDES ( 80) 

68. Sh. A.P. Frank Noronha, 11s (’82)
69. Sh. S.R. Kar, XIS (’83)
70.
Sh. Y.S. Dhatwalia.     11s (’84)

71.
Sh. O.P. Gehlaut, CTS (-84)

I :a?
72.
Sh. Shafaat Ahamed, CTS (’86)

73.
Ms. pl1k.a Ojha, CTS (‘861

74.
Ms. Frat ma Tripathi, CTS (’86

75.
SH. N.D. egnihotri, CTS (’79)

Qujarmt
1.    
Sh. Ashim Khurana, IAS (1983),.Deputy Secretary(Home)

2.    
Sh. I.P. Gautam, IAS (1986), Flssistant Collector, pl hmeda bad

3.    
Ms. Rita Teaotia, IplS (1981), Collecter, Gendhi Nagar

4.    
E;h. Hasmukh Adhia, IAS (19811, Additional Commissioner, Rural Development

5.    
Sh. S. Jagadeesan, IAS (1980),-Deputy Sevetary
(Finance)

6.    
Sh. Amarjeet Singh, IAS (19821,Deputy Secretary
(Energy 1

Kamatak

1.
Smt. Neelmani N Raju, IPS

2.
Sh. G.V. Krishna Rau

3.
Sh. L.V. Nagarajan

4.
Sh. K.P. Krishnan

5.
Sh. T.M. Vijay Phaskar

6.
Sh. Anup K Pujari

Uttar Pradesh
1. Sh. J.S. Deepak, IAS (’82)
2. Sh. Anil Swarup, IAS (’81)
3. Sh. Rajeev Eapoor, IAS (’83)
4. Hs. Aradhana Johri, IAS (’80)
5. Sh. Gopal GLipta, IPS (’83)
6. Sh. R.R. Phatnagar, IPS (’83)
7. Ms. Sritapa Sanyal, IPS (’84)
8. Sh. Vija.y Singh, IPS (’81)
9. Dr. Arun K     Manocha, IRTS (’80)
10. Sh. R. Rharadwaj, IRTS (’82)
11. Sh. Rak.es:h Trip3thi. IRTS (‘el)
12. Sh. Jaswant     Bai, IRPS (’83)
13. Ms. Nisha Tiwari. IRPS (’84)
14. Ms. Anjali     Bajpai , IITS (’85)
15. Sh. GiriJa     Dayal. IITS (’85)
16. Sh. AshoC,     Indian Postal Service (’81)
17. Sh. Ashutosh Tripathi. Indian Postal Service (‘Bf)
18. Sh. Suresh Chandra. RFF (’86)
YIII

Trainlno AraLLpmims 6
9-
La1 Bahadur Sha6tri National Academy ot hdministration, Musmoori.
1. Sh. B.N. Yugandher, Director
2.     Sh. Lalit Mathur, Joint Director and
Senior members of Directorial staff and Faculty of the Academy
and
About 209 probationers of various Services undergoing Foundation Course in the Academy
Sardar Vallabh Bhai Patel National police Flcadrmy, Hyderabad
1. Dr. A.A. Ali, IPS I 33) Director "L. Sh. V.K. DeusKar, IPS ( 631, Deputy Director
3.
Sh. V. Svbha Kao, IPS (’66),Deputy. Director

4.
Sh. R.K. Johri, IPS (’73),Assistant Director

5.
Sh. S.Ramekrishnan, IPS (‘731 Assistant Director

Administrative Staff Collmge of India..Hydmtabad Frnfessor Dharni P. Sinha, Principal, and Senior Faculty Member of ASCI
Indian Inutitutc of Public Rdministration, New D8lhi
1.
Sh. Uma Shankar, Director

2.
Dr. K.S. Shukla, Professor

3.    
Dr. S.R. Mz.heshwari, Professor of Pol.Sc. F! Public Administration

4.
Dr. 0.P. Minocha, Professor of Public administration

Cental Institute of Languages, Mymore
1.

L.
3 .
4.
Strtr Instutr ot Admini8trative Trrinlng, My8Ore
1. Sh. Cheeranajiv Singh.     Director

L.
3.

4.     –
t Ottirrrs and

1.    
Sh. Anil Bordia, Secretary (Education), Government of India

2.    
Sh. J. Veera Raghavan. Secretary (HRD), Government crf India

3.    
Sh. S.K. Sheriff, Director of Transport, Delhi Administration.

4.    
Sh. S.P. Vishnoi,Commissionet & Secretary (fidministrative Reforms) Government of Raj asthan

a.     ur. E.N. Raj, Former Vice-Chancellor, Delhi University and Member, Prime Minister’s Economic Advisory. Council (Trivandrum)
6. Dr. Sudhir b:ak.ar,     Psychologist E! Management Expert
*.atsx 1:
APPENDIX -VIXI
SUMMARY OF CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
s1. Recommendation / Conc 1 usion Para Nuaber Number
~ ~~
1.     The higher Civil Services play a significant 2.010; role in both regrulatorr and developmental and admiqistration in our countr:/ and are dl50 2.011:13 ass:2cistvI! in po:icy maling. Besides, the All Inn 3 Services t,ave a u’liqc1.e role in oiir federal pnlxty. Persons to be recrciited for the higher Civil Serdicces should be drawn from a broad base. Thev cihou:d. ir! additian co intellectclal ability. posses integrity and ha.,e ccmmrtment and dedication to iiur rationai objective+ and goals.
?. The nc!mber of aspirants tn the Civil Services in 2.171Cl7 lndra is very large. They have diverse socio-and economic and educational backgrounds. The 2.0117R methodsYogy 3f selection has to take note of the wid? di,Jer-c:^_iPs obtaining In the Indian situation, ?nd shoald be such as to be perceived to be fair not only by the candidate himself but also by the public at large.

_.. The Committee studied the pattern of 2.0110 recruitment to the Civil Services obtaining in some advanced countries.The Committee is of the view
that models developed in these countries in a different environment cannot be replicated in the Indian situation. The Committe recommends improving. upon the existing system in the country which has evolved over a long period sf time. 
4.  Data for the period 1984-87 reveal that 20% of general candldates, 53% of the candidates belonging to tne Scheduled Castes and 48% of the candidates belonging to the Scheduled Trlbes are from the low income group as defined.  .3.0101 
9.  There 1% a significant generation learners among candidates. (1984-87)  number me  of flrst successful  ?.OlGZ and 
6.  Data for 19B4-87 show that in terms of place of birth and major part of school education received. a fair proportlon of successful candidates have come from villages or small towns.  3.01U6 to 3.0109 
7.  Percentage of succeseful women candidates is on the increase, but there is scope for further ‘improvement. The Committee observes that not enough number of women candidates are attracted to the Civil Services. In the Central Services, there is All-India transfer 1iability.There is need for evolving a hiore liberal procedure than obtaining at  3.ClZO2 to 3.0204 

present, of posting husband and wife in the same
station. Among other things, it is recommended,
that special principles for cadre allocation for
the All India Services should be adopted
officers.

8. Percentage of first class degree holders (1979 3.0301

8′)

among the successful candidates is on the

increase.

9.    
The UPSC has been able to recruit candidates belonging to the Scheduled Caste and the Scheduled Tribes in aacordance with the Statutory requirements. Some candidates be1oBiging to these categorieg are a150 qualifying by general standards. which 1s a welcome trend. The Committee recommends that such candidates who were high up on the Merit List, without having availed of age concession and conces5ion in terms of numbers of chances.should be treated a5 general candidates and shoicld not be set off against the Reserved quota.

10.    
There should be a combined examination for the higher Civil Services. Professional competence for each service could be developed through proper training.

3.04
4.0101
to
4.0106

11.  The top ranhers in the merit list generaly Join the ICIS and IFS. There is no need for extra papers or higher marks in the Interview Test for these two services as their requirements of bright candidates is now being fully met.  4.0202 to 4.0204 
12. No departure from the present practice of common examination is recommended in respect 3f the Indian Foreign Service, which i.s generally the second most preferred service ana is able to attract bright randidetes. The slight decline in the popularity of this service is hot due to the system of examciaation.  4.0906 tc 4.0.:10 
.b(7-.. No departure from the system of c@mmon examination 1% recommended ‘for the 1ndia.n Police Service which is already attracting high ranking candidates. Candidates volunteering for the IPS are likely to be material of good quality with proper training.  4.0403 to 4.04::18 
14.  For the Accounts Group of Services no separate Examination is recommended. Professional knowledge of a high standard can be imparted through systematic post-induction training.  4.0504 to 4.0905 

1s.  Recruitment to the Revenue and Taxation services should continue to be through the system of common examination.  4.OC 
16.  Recruitment to the following group A Seervices should be delinled rom the Civil Services Examination: (1) Indian Defence Estates Service (11) Central Trade Service (121) Indian Information Service (iv) Indian Railway Personnel Service (v) Indian Ordnance Factories Service (vi) Ussistant Commandant of CISF (vii) Assistant Security Dfficer of RPF  4.0721 
17.  Pecruitment to delinbed frim the  Group Civil  F Services should be Services Examination.  4.702. 4.705 to 
la.  Proliferation in the services should be a.voided.  number  of  central  4.712 
19. Pearing in mind the present requirements, the present scheme of the Civil Services Examination has been able to achieve its broad objettives.  5.0101 and 3.0102 
20.  ObJective Type Test should not be introduced in the Wain Examination .  5.0103 

21.    
Candidates who qualified for the Interview Test 5.0103 should be exempted from taking the Preliminary to Examination in the following year. 5.0107.

22.    
Doctors and Enginners should continue to be 5.02 eligible for the Civil gervices Examination. The Committee. hobever, is of the view that doctors and engineers being attracted towards the Civil Services indicates at1 aberration in the social value system and reflects, inter-alia, disparities in career opportunities

23.    
The present relative weightage of 1 : 2 a5 bdtween 5.05 Genersl Studies anb the Optional Sub~ects should con tiniie

24.    
An Essary Faper for 200 mark.5 should be 3.04 introduced in the Main Examination. Candidates should be allowed to answer this paper either in English or .in any one of the Indian Languages mentioned in t.he Eighth Schedule of the Constitution. We also recommend that the Essay Paper should be e::amined by two examiners and the average of the marks taken into account.

25.
The following optional subjects should be

deleted from the syllabusr-     5.014
and
French, German, Russian and Chinese. 5.0915

26.    
The following Optional Subjects may be included. 5.0516 both for the Preliminary and the Nab Examinations:-

Education, Electronic and Telecommunication
Engineering, a?d Medical Science.

27.    
The present system of moderation adopted by the 5.0519 UPSC is working satisfactorily so as to ensure that to no particyiar subject gets an undue advantage. 5.Ctfr2l

18.     There should be negative marking for ObJeCtiVe 5.06 Type Teats at the Freliminary Examination. For each wrong answer SO per cent of the marks allotted to that questLon shold be deducted.
79.     F6ychologicai Test should not be a part of the 5.0701
selection procedure. These Tests could be to
administered to the probationers, and used as 5.0706
guides for counselling at the training level.

30.     Introduction of "lectures" should not be part of 5.0707 the selection process.
31.
Group Discussion should be introduced as an 5.0708

to adjunct to the Interview Test. 5.0710

32.    
Interview Test should carry 300 marks (as 5.08 against 250 now) out of a total of 2300 marks (as against 2030

33.    
There should be no minimum qualifying marks 5. 0807 for a candidare at the Interview TEst.

34.    
The age limit should continue to be 21 to 26 5.179 years for the general candidates with the usual relavation of five years Yor the candidates belonging to the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes.

Z’. The general csndidstes should be permitted three S.1i~ attempts and +he candidates belonging to Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes should be permitted six sttempts. The b othari Committee had recommended two attempts on the grot-ind that the candidates wsed the third attempt to improve the Service preference and neglected training. This has teen adequately taken care of by the Civil Service6 Examination Rules which lay down that if a candidate is selected for Group A Service other than IAS and IFS, he would be permitted to take one more chance in the subsequent year ic he seeks:-exemption from training thereby

67 1-

losing his inter-se should continue.  seniority.  This  practice 
5.6.  Allotment of Scrvices should continue to be done on the basis of the rank of the candidate in the Merit t-ist and the preferences for the Services expressed by the candidate. Allotment of Services after a Common Foundation Course is not feasible.  9.11 
57.  lhe ILa1 Bahadur Shastri National Plcademy of Administration should be deweloped into a high lewl professional institution. although a number of roncrete steps have been taken in this regard in the recent past. development of the Faculty and infrastructural facilities should be paid adequate attention.  5.115 
38.  Research on developmental regulatory and social sspects of administration should be a regular actiiity at the Academy. Comparative developmental studies should be undertak.en taking lessons from the e-perience from both the developing and deve1oped cowtries.  5.116 
39.  The functioning of the training institutions for the Central Services and the S.V.P. National Police Academy should be studied in depth. In all these institutions, idequate infrastructural’  5.117 

facilities disciplinary  and proper staffing Faculty should be  with ensured.  inter-
40.  The present time cycle for the Civil Services Examination is rather long. The application form can be-filled up by the candidates at the time of the Preliminary Exaimation. The Main Examination can be held in the month of October. Thus, about faur weeks time can be saved.  6.1 
41.  The number of successful candidates trom Delhi being large should not cause any concern as candidates +ram all over the country are studying at Delhi. But llbrary and other facilities available in Delhi should be replicated in other cities and towns with the he’lp of the State Governmen te .  6.24 
42.  Coaching Centres should be started by the State Eovernments in those States from which representation in the hi.gher Civil Services is not adequate.  b.T5 
43.  Rt present the candidates are allowed to take the examination either in English or in any one of the Indian Languages mentioned in the 8th Schedule of the Constitution. The system is fair and is not biased in favour of any lingu’istic group .  6.26 

44. UGC may review the scheme of providing coaching 6.27
classes in selected institutions to persons

belonging to minority communities to enable them to

compete in various competitive examinations.

45.    
The number of Centres $or the Preliminary 6.3 Examination should be increased in consultation with the State Governments and the Union Territories Administration.

46.    
There should be adequate publicity about the 6.4 Civil Services Examination through the print and the electronic media. The distribution system of the Government of India. Publications. should be strengthened.

47.    
The syllabi of the Optional Subjects should be 6.5 spelt out comprehensively and revised and updated every five years or more often.

Written by upsc aspirants

February 27th, 2012 at 7:48 pm

2 Responses to 'Report of Satish Chandra Committee on Civil Services Examination'

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  1. Sir,

    We need the Satish Chandra Report on a “very urgent” basis.

    Kindly forward the pdf link/pdf format of the report asap.

    I will be highly obliged to your forum.

    Regards,
    Abhay

    Abhay

    20 Sep 13 at 5:21 pm

  2. Dear Admin,

    Kindly provide me report of Satish Chandra committee. Kindly provide me asap.

    Thank you

    Shilpi Tyagi

    21 Sep 13 at 4:58 pm

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